Posts Tagged ‘Art’

RPGaDat 2017 #12

Posted on August 12th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Question #12
Which RPG has the most inspiring interior art?

I really liked the Timothy Bradstreet illustrations in the original Twilight: 2000 rpg game and modules. Those black and white, sketchy illustrations with heavy shadows (most of which were based on iconic black and white photos from Vietnam or others conflicts) I though really captured the gritty, harsh reality of the game.

More recently? The illustrations in Tales from the Loop are really fun. But that whole game is BASED on the amazing artwork of Simon Stålenhag, so…

RPGaDay 2017 #12

Posted on August 12th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Question #12
Which RPG has the most inspiring interior art?

I really liked the Timothy Bradstreet illustrations in the original Twilight: 2000 rpg game and modules. Those black and white, sketchy illustrations with heavy shadows (most of which were based on iconic black and white photos from Vietnam or others conflicts) I though really captured the gritty, harsh reality of the game.

More recently? The illustrations in Tales from the Loop are really fun. But that whole game is BASED on the amazing artwork of Simon Stålenhag, so…

The Great Ziggurat of Draconis

Posted on August 8th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

I have awakened from my long blogging slumber! This past weekend was Ultracon 6, our friends and family convention. The theme for this year was a sunken city named Draconis, which had risen for various campaign reasons. We had fifteen players, in three groups of five playing the adventure. The player characters were submerged the entire day Saturday, which made for some interesting three-dimensional combat. To make the latter work better we created water stands that would slide up and down a dowel. After some quick measurements from a ruler, you were swimming up and down in no time!

Our water stands in use for 3D combat!

Their enemies included Deep Ones, Mind Flayers, Aboleth, and an Elder Brain. But the big battle would be at the Great Ziggurat at the center of the city. There Nethyrmaul the Undying, the ancient dracolich, would be waiting for them. We designed the encounter so Nethyrmaul took turns attacking a different group each round. All the while the PCs had to deal with an army of ghouls, stone guards, paralyzing traps, and caustic water spouts.

To facilitate this, we decided a piece of custom terrain was needed. My friend Ike Horton, and fellow DM Team member, volunteered for the task. For background Ike is the person who introduced me to the Dungeons and Dragons game all the way back in 1983. He is also a very talented paper craft artist so it was no surprise the Great Ziggurat would be a visual feast when completed. Ike shared various progress pictures along the way to the DM Team, but nothing compared to when it was finally revealed.

As you can see from the pictures below, Ike made a monstrous piece of terrain. The entire ziggurat is scratch built and measures an eye popping 7’ long, 5’ high, and 3’ wide! We had to use four tables in the hotel just to set the ziggurat up before the big reveal to the players. One fantastic part of the design is all three sides separate from the main ziggurat. This way each of our three tables had a piece as the different groups battled their way to the top.

Front view of the Great Ziggurat

Here you can see how the sides connected.

Another view of the sides.

A close-up of a Tiamat sigil & caustic water spouts.

Nethyrmaul waiting for a PC to snack on.

Example of a detached side at the game table.

I just want to commend Ike again on his amazing work designing such an unforgettable game prop. You can find Ike on Facebook here. If you have a piece of papercraft art in mind, or maybe even some custom gaming terrain contact him. Ike has a busy schedule, and often multiple commissions, but I’m sure he would love to hear from you!

We have already started working on Ultracon for next summer. If you have never tried, I highly recommend putting together a family and friends convention. It’s very rewarding gathering together old friends and new for a weekend of gaming, camaraderie, and steel on steel! You would be surprised how many crafty people are in your circle, and all the amazing things you can create together.

Custom terrain and props by another member of the DM Team.

Coffeemill Exposition Mortsel

Posted on July 20th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

In Mortsel, near Antwerp, a rather unique collection is on display until coming saturday, the 22nd of july.


Located in an empty store, the private collection of Rene Vanhove, together with a few pieces of fellow collectors, is displayed for all those loving the black gold.

The Dutch introduction, sourced from UitInVlaanderen, reads as follows:

Oude koffiemolens krijgen bij René Vanhove uit Hove een tweede leven. Hij herstelt ze allemaal eigenhandig en in hun oorspronkelijke staat.
Zes jaar geleden kreeg hij zijn eerste koffiemolen, die van de bomma. Nu heeft hij er een 130-tal staan. Handmatige molens, geen elektrische. Zijn grote trots zijn de twee Brusselse toonbankkoffiemolens van J. Van Cauteren uit 1850. Ook geliefd zijn de ‘boerenvlaamse’ molens en de koffiemolens van Peugeot uit Frankrijk of hangkoffiemolens uit België -Nederland en Duitsland.
“Ik vind het prettig om in alle rust iets te kunnen opbouwen, om vergane glorie te herstellen. Je kan geen brute kracht gebruiken voor koffiemolens, je moet heel geduldig zijn, opbouwend werken en vooral er de tijd voor nemen.”
Ondertussen is hij ook lid van de internationale club van koffiemolenverzamelaars ( AICMC) waarbij slechts een paar Belgen toegelaten zijn.
René stelt zijn opmerkelijke collectie tentoon in Mortsel. De tentoonstelling wordt aangevuld met enkele zeldzame exemplaren van bevriende verzamelaars.

Now, the exposition isn`t a huge museum or something, but it is a nice stroll through the past of the venerable coffee mill, from the old hand models to the first efforts at electrifying the machines.

Personally, I adored this collection of wall hanging mills, a lot of them gorgeously decorated.

It also has some serious oddities, like this italian one where someone did their own “handyman job” on powering it.

If you are in the neighbourhood, make sure to drop by this lovely little exposition for a trip through the history of grinding your coffeebeans!

It`s open between 14 and 18 hrs, and the entrance is totally free.

Coffeemill Exposition Mortsel

Posted on July 20th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

In Mortsel, near Antwerp, a rather unique collection is on display until coming saturday, the 22nd of july.


Located in an empty store, the private collection of Rene Vanhove, together with a few pieces of fellow collectors, is displayed for all those loving the black gold.

The Dutch introduction, sourced from UitInVlaanderen, reads as follows:

Oude koffiemolens krijgen bij René Vanhove uit Hove een tweede leven. Hij herstelt ze allemaal eigenhandig en in hun oorspronkelijke staat.
Zes jaar geleden kreeg hij zijn eerste koffiemolen, die van de bomma. Nu heeft hij er een 130-tal staan. Handmatige molens, geen elektrische. Zijn grote trots zijn de twee Brusselse toonbankkoffiemolens van J. Van Cauteren uit 1850. Ook geliefd zijn de ‘boerenvlaamse’ molens en de koffiemolens van Peugeot uit Frankrijk of hangkoffiemolens uit België -Nederland en Duitsland.
“Ik vind het prettig om in alle rust iets te kunnen opbouwen, om vergane glorie te herstellen. Je kan geen brute kracht gebruiken voor koffiemolens, je moet heel geduldig zijn, opbouwend werken en vooral er de tijd voor nemen.”
Ondertussen is hij ook lid van de internationale club van koffiemolenverzamelaars ( AICMC) waarbij slechts een paar Belgen toegelaten zijn.
René stelt zijn opmerkelijke collectie tentoon in Mortsel. De tentoonstelling wordt aangevuld met enkele zeldzame exemplaren van bevriende verzamelaars.

Now, the exposition isn`t a huge museum or something, but it is a nice stroll through the past of the venerable coffee mill, from the old hand models to the first efforts at electrifying the machines.

Personally, I adored this collection of wall hanging mills, a lot of them gorgeously decorated.

It also has some serious oddities, like this italian one where someone did their own “handyman job” on powering it.

If you are in the neighbourhood, make sure to drop by this lovely little exposition for a trip through the history of grinding your coffeebeans!

It`s open between 14 and 18 hrs, and the entrance is totally free.