Posts Tagged ‘Games Workshop’

WIP: Archaon the Everchosen Part 4

Posted on May 3rd, 2016 under , , , , , , . Posted by

Archaon has set a new record for number of posts. I promise the next time you see him he will be finished, hopefully, y’all have appreciated seeing this project come together. There were many moving parts to manage which had me painting out of order th…

Black Library Newsletter

Posted on May 3rd, 2016 under , , , , . Posted by

Some interesting new bundles from the Black Library…

This week, we’re releasing seven (yes, seven) classic full colour comics from the worlds of Warhammer 40,000 and Warhammer Fantasy Battles.

Each one is packed full of action, explosions, cool stories and obligatory sound effects like Fa-Thoom!

Explore tales of the Black Templars, penned by the mighty Dan Abnett. Or join the Astra Militarum on the front line with action written by Graham McNeill.

There’s something for everyone here. If you don’t believe us, head over to the site and see for yourself.

We love words at Black Library, but sometimes you can’t beat a great graphic novel to kick back and relax with – why not try it?

Can’t decide which ones to buy? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered with these two great value bundles. Order all seven eBooks or paperbacks and save yourself a few pennies:
All 7 for the price of 6

All 7 for the price of 5

 
The Bladestorm continues in part six of the Quick Reads series

With his forces devastated and enemies on all sides, Lord-Celestant Thostos Bladestorm puts into action an audacious plan that could spell victory or doom his remaining warriors to a painful death.
 

Read the whole story so far with the amazing valuesubscription – all 7 instalments for the price of just 4.

Facebook
Website
© Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2016. GW, Games Workshop, Black Library, The Horus Heresy, Space Marine, 40K, Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000, Age of Sigmar, Stormcast Eternal and all associated logos, illustrations, images, names, creatures, races, vehicles, locations, weapons, characters, and the distinctive likenesses thereof, are either ® or TM, and/or © Games Workshop Limited, variably registered around the world. All Rights Reserved.

Games Workshop Ltd, Willow Road, Lenton, Nottingham, NG7 2WS
Registered in England and Wales –  Company No. 01467092. VAT No. GB 580853421

Our mailing address is:
contact @blacklibrary.com

Deathwatch Overkillin’

Posted on May 3rd, 2016 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

As the dust settles around the Google AdSense Comeptitions and I try and marshall my thoughts, deal with my neck/arm pain and cope with the new IT regime I thought I’d just share the highlights of a couple of Deathwatch Overkill games PeteB and I playe…

Warhammer Digital Newsletter

Posted on May 1st, 2016 under , , , . Posted by

Some new things to do with your Warhammer 40K flyers…apparently…

Facebook
Website
© Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2016. GW, Games Workshop, Black Library, The Horus Heresy, Space Marine, 40K, Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000, Age of Sigmar, Stormcast Eternal and all associated logos, illustrations, images, names, creatures, races, vehicles, locations, weapons, characters, and the distinctive likenesses thereof, are either ® or TM, and/or © Games Workshop Limited, variably registered around the world. All Rights Reserved.

Games Workshop Limited, Willow Road, Lenton, Nottingham, NG7 2WS Registered in England and Wales – Company No. 01467092. VAT No. GB 580853421

Our mailing address is:
digital@gwplc.com

Black Library Newsletter

Posted on May 1st, 2016 under , , , . Posted by

Some new releases from the Black Library…

Facebook
Website
© Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2016. GW, Games Workshop, Black Library, The Horus Heresy, Space Marine, 40K, Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000, Age of Sigmar, Stormcast Eternal and all associated logos, illustrations, images, names, creatures, races, vehicles, locations, weapons, characters, and the distinctive likenesses thereof, are either ® or TM, and/or © Games Workshop Limited, variably registered around the world. All Rights Reserved.

Games Workshop Ltd, Willow Road, Lenton, Nottingham, NG7 2WS
Registered in England and Wales –  Company No. 01467092. VAT No. GB 580853421

Our mailing address is:
contact @blacklibrary.com

Drakula – Figurkowy Karnawał Blogowy XX | Dracula – Miniatures Blog Carnival XX

Posted on April 30th, 2016 under , , , , . Posted by

Trochę jadę po bandzie – psim swędem załapuję się na XX, jubileuszową edycję mojego własnego dzieła, Figurkowego Karnawału Blogowego. Raz, że w ostatniej chwili, poproszony przez prowadzącego tą edycję Czakiego, dwa że figurką, którą i tak miałem na warsztacie (aczkolwiek zaledwie w podkładzie), trzy… że teoretycznie magiczną, czyli zgodną z tematem jeszcze trwającego Karnawału – Magia – ale teoretycznie… Przedstawiam bowiem Drakulę, czyli kolejnego, starego wampira produkcji Citadel.
Przyjmijmy jednak, że definicja magii jest tak szeroka, że załapują się do niej krwiopijcy – przemieniają się bowiem w mgłę, chmarę nietoperzy czy jakieś inne monstra, rzucają uroki, a w mojej ulubionej grze są przecież pełnoprawnymi czarownikami. Czyli – liczy się do tematu:)
Pokazałem wcześniej Nosferatu, musowo było też pokazać Drakulę. Miniaturka wydana w tym samym, z tego co pamiętam, co Nosferatu, również część serii Night Horrors. Klasyczny krwiopijec rodem z horrorów klasy B – peleryna, kły wyszczerzone w agresji. U mnie będzie kolejnym przeciwnikiem poszukiwaczy przygód we Frostgrave.
Malowanie błyskawiczne, choć już nie liczone w minutach – zajął mi około dwóch godzin, sporo czasu poświęciłem na płaszcz. Liczne fałdy aż się prosiły o podkreślenie, było też sporo płaszczyzn wymagających choć elementarnego rozjaśnienia.

This is a kind of “last chance” entry – I barely managed to paing something for XX edition of Miniatures Blog Carnival – an event started by me almost two years ago, kind of community effort to paint something according to the selected theme. And the theme of current edition is magic. As you can see, my entry is done almost too late and is barely acceptable. Let me introduce Drakula, another old, classic Citadel Vampire.

Let’s assume that definition of magic is so brad, that it encompasses blodsuckers too – they do change into a mist of bats, they cast glamours, etc – definitely magical in my book. And let’s not forget that they are magic users in my favourite game too.

As I showed earlier Nosferatu, it is only right to show Dracula. This miniature was released in the same time as previously shown vapire, as a part of Night Horror range too. This is classical vampire from horror B movies – theatrical cloak, bared fangs… It will do fine as another opponent for adventurers in Frostgrave games.

Painting was really fast, but it wasn’t counted in minutes anymore – it took me about two hours to paint this miniature, as a lot of time went into the cloak. It has folds which demended sharp highlights and some smooth surfaces where rudimentary blending was necessary too.


WIP: Archaon the Everchosen Part 3

Posted on April 30th, 2016 under , , , , , , . Posted by

This time around I’m in the process of adding many many hours of brushwork to the Everchosen. Finally able to detail the focus areas of this monster :) Mainly the three heads and Archaon himself.Before laying down any of the brass tones I basecoaed the…

Games Workshop Newsletter

Posted on April 30th, 2016 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

Some new flyers for Warhammer 40K from Games Workshop…

Games Workshop
Warhammer Age of Sigmar Warhammer 40,000 Books & Digital
FREE Fastest delivery.   Read all delivery information here.
Death from the Skies
Stormhawk Interceptor
Wazbom Blastajet
Gork and Mork Dice
Our spanky Webstore Blog explores what the new Death from the Skies rules mean for YOU!
Warhammer Fest - Get your ticket now
© Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2016. GW, Games Workshop, Citadel, White Dwarf, Space Marine, 40K, Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000, the ‘Aquila’ Double-headed Eagle logo, Warhammer Age of Sigmar, Battletome, Stormcast Eternals, and all associated logos, illustrations, images, names, creatures, races, vehicles, locations, weapons, characters, and the distinctive likenesses thereof, are either ® or ™, and/or © Games Workshop Limited, variably registered around the world. All Rights Reserved.
© Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All rights reserved. THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY, THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG, THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES and the names of the characters, items, events and places therein are trademarks of The Saul Zaentz Company d/b/a Middle-earth Enterprises under license to New Line Productions, Inc.         (s15)
© 2016 New Line Productions, Inc. All rights reserved. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King and the names of the characters, items, events and places therein are trademarks of The Saul Zaentz Company d/b/a Middle-earth Enterprises under license to New Line Productions, Inc.

‘nids part 197 – Deathwatch Overkill update

Posted on April 30th, 2016 under , , , . Posted by

Not much to see here I did make a spray stick though – a small piece of wood I had in the garage for years, some double sided tape and the Aberrants, heavy weapons hybrids and a few other first and second hybrids.So much easier to spray, although next …

Black Library Newsletter

Posted on April 29th, 2016 under , , , , . Posted by

The first in a new series from the Black Library…

© Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2016. GW, Games Workshop, Black Library, The Horus Heresy, Space Marine, 40K, Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000, Age of Sigmar, Stormcast Eternal and all associated logos, illustrations, images, names, creatures, races, vehicles, locations, weapons, characters, and the distinctive likenesses thereof, are either ® or TM, and/or © Games Workshop Limited, variably registered around the world. All Rights Reserved.

Games Workshop Ltd, Willow Road, Lenton, Nottingham, NG7 2WS
Registered in England and Wales –  Company No. 01467092. VAT No. GB 580853421

Our mailing address is:
contact @blacklibrary.com

Gav Thorpe Newsletter

Posted on April 29th, 2016 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

Another newsletter from the author Gav Thorpe…

Should you wish to receive this newsletter direct then you can subscribe to it here.

Fantasy Artwork from Gav's Website
  • Hello!
  • Kickstarter
  • Nu Thai Screw Job
  • Interviews
  • Upcoming Events
  • Q&A
  • Blog Post Round-Up
  • Bi-Monthly Competition

Hello!

After a few illness-induced disruptions last month I’m finally back into the groove, at least on the writing front. I’m steadily cruising my way through a novel for the Space Marine Legends series, more of that to come when I’m free to share more details. Rewrites are in for the next instalment of the Raven Guard story in the Horus Heresy. And on top of that I’ve even managed to squeeze in a little original fantasy fiction for a forthcoming indie press anthology.
Not quite so business-as-usual were my trips to Daffcon and Salute 2016. The first was a great weekend playing Open Combat and demos of some lesser-known game systems. It really brought home how vibrant the tabletop games community and industry have become. One of those games, Mythos, is on Kickstarter right now and I invited the creators to do a guest post for the blog last week.
Salute was a different sort of beast. I spent the day with Carl Brown of Second Thunder introducing folks to the joys of Open Combat. Though it’s Carl’s brainchild through and through, it’s nice to see a friend prosper and see a games system I really like start to gain traction with players. There was a lot of interest, and sales to match. In particular it was nice to hear that word has spread – quite a few folks had heard of the game online and through clubs, “Is this the one you can use with any miniatures?” Just like selling books, getting the key message out there about a new game is sometimes not glamorous, but it is essential.

Kickstarter

Mythos is a tabletop horror skirmish game inspired by H.P.Lovecraft. Put your characters sanity to the test while trying to stay alive.”
I had the opportunity to play Mythos from Paranoid Miniatures at Daffcon recently – it’s great fun and I was particularly impressed by the design and story of the characters.
The Kickstarter has funded, and stretch goals are starting to be met – like the miniature for Dorothy Good, Leader of the Wildborn faction, pictured below.
Dorothy Good from Mythos
Kritterkins on Kickstarter
There are 11 days to go on the Kickstarter for these cute little Kritterkins, from Bombshell miniatures. Regular readers of my blog will know I have a thing for animal minis, and I think these lovely little sculpts are going to make me break my current ‘no Kickstarter’ rule, as I can see great potential for use with Open Combat.
Aka-San Mini from Bombshell Miniatures

Nu Thai Screw-Job

Cover of Grimdark Magazine Issue 7
I was really pleased to have my short story ‘Nu Thai Screw Job‘ published in the latest issue of Grimdark magazine.  If you like your fiction a bit more ‘adult’, it’s a cyber-punk story about sex and power, and the dangers when both are abused.
“I sit on the end of the bed and pull on black calf-length boots, ignoring Eric as he flops out of the pay-by-the-hour motel cot. Still thirty minutes on the clock but no point hanging around.”

Interviews

It has been a busy month for interviews – you can hear a lengthy discussion about The Emperor Expects and being part of the shared narrative that is The Beast Arises series (including book eight in the series – The Beast Must Die!) over on the Combat Phase Podcast.
You can also read interviews over atCivilian Reader and Age of Sigmar Battle Reports where I discuss what it was like writing in the new Age of Sigmar setting, give some background to Arkas Warbeast himself, and my next Horus Heresy novel Angels of Caliban.
Logo for Fantasycon By The Sea
Do come and say ‘hello’ if you’re attending any of these events.

Newsletter Q&A

Matthew asked on the blog: I wanted to know if you knew anything about Black Library’s policy on multiple submissions. It doesn’t seem to say anything in the guidelines against it.
Given the way the process works, I would pick what you think is your best idea and go with that – they are looking at you as a writer as much as the particular idea you are pitching. Focus your energies on one awesome submission. If you’ve got plenty of ideas for stories that’s great, but make sure the one you send in has got enough meat to it to last ten thousand words – that’s pretty long for a short story and you may want to see if you can fold in a character idea or subplot from your others to  add some depth. All the best with your writing.
If you want to ask a question, just reply to the newsletter and I’ll get back to you as soon as my schedule allows.  I’ll pick the best question to go in the next newsletter, and combine them all into a blog post for the website.  Click the button below for the full Q&A round-up for March.

Blog Post Round-Up

The blog has been a bit sparse this month due to illness, workload, and weekend events, so other than the blogs already mentioned in the newsletter, you can also read my event report for Daffcon, a new ‘multi-system gaming convention for small games’ that took place in Cardiff. There’s also a guest blog from the guys at Paranoid Miniatures who are currently running the Mythos Kickstarter.  Black Library have also released some new Horus Heresy prints, which you can read more about here.

Bi-Monthly Competition

One of the perks of subscribing to my mailing list is that you get entered into the bi-monthly draw to win a personalised, signed copy of one of my books.  The next draw will take place in May, and the winner will receive a copy of my next Horus Heresy novel Angels of Caliban, when it is released in June.
Cover of The Emperor Expects by Gav Thorpe, published by Black Library
Cover of Warbeast by Gav Thorpe, published by Black Library
Cover of Ravenlord by Gav Thorpe, published by Black Library

Nosferatu

Posted on April 28th, 2016 under , , , , , . Posted by

Następna figurka w mojej kolejce malowania ze zbioru “jak najszybciej, najlepiej do pół godziny” to ten stareńki wampir, wydany w okolicach 1985 r. Wchodził w skład wspominanej już wielokrotnie na łamach bloga serii Night Horrors. Kupiłem go do swojej pierwszej armii ożywieńców, ostatecznie jednak pomalowałem do niej innego wampira – w tej chwili zmyty czeka na nowe malowanie, a jego konkurent doczekał się, w końcu, dotyku pędzla.
Przyznam, że niegdyś nie byłem specjalnym fanem tej figurki, wydawała mi się dość brzydka, ale na tle – jak mi się zdawało – i tak nienajfajniejszych ówczesnych wampirów, mogła jeszcze ujść. Dziś moje zdanie na ten temat diametralnie się zmieniło, podoba mi się bowiem ta miniaturka okrutnie. Jej poza, grymas na twarzy, ciało konsolidujące się z mgły czy też dymu. No, po prostu, Nosferatu ze starego filmu co się zowie. Będzie godnym przeciwnikiem poszukiwaczy skarbów z Frostgrave, a – co jest dodatkowym bonusem – jest całkiem spory, wygląda nieźle nawet przy obecnych miniaturkach, więc pojawi się może też w jakiejś większej bitwie.

Next miniature in my slowly diminishing line of figures which I may “paint as fast as possible, 30 minutex max” is this very old vampire, released back in 1985 as a part of Night Horrors range. I bought him for my first Undead army but decided to paint another bloodsucker for my commander. As it turns out, my old commander is currently stripped of paint and this one has finally been touched by brush.

I must admit that I didn’t especially like this particular miniature. I thought that it is rather ugly but it was one of the better sculpts anyway. Today I have drastically different opinion – I, simply, love this little fellow. I like his pose, grin on his face, his body growing solid from a smoke or a mist. This is stunning Nosferatu, straight from this old movie. This vampire will make a fine opponent for my group of Frostgrave knowledge seekers. Additionally, he is quite large, which makes him a possible choice for bigger battles, where he won’t look out of place between newer miniatures.


Black Library Newsletter

Posted on April 28th, 2016 under , , , . Posted by

Something new from the Black Library…

© Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2016. GW, Games Workshop, Black Library, The Horus Heresy, Space Marine, 40K, Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000, Age of Sigmar, Stormcast Eternal and all associated logos, illustrations, images, names, creatures, races, vehicles, locations, weapons, characters, and the distinctive likenesses thereof, are either ® or TM, and/or © Games Workshop Limited, variably registered around the world. All Rights Reserved.

Games Workshop Ltd, Willow Road, Lenton, Nottingham, NG7 2WS
Registered in England and Wales –  Company No. 01467092. VAT No. GB 580853421

Our mailing address is:
contact @blacklibrary.com

Jaskiniowy trol | Cave troll

Posted on April 26th, 2016 under , , , , . Posted by

Mormeg pomalował pierwszego z większych stworów do swojej armii sługusów Saurona – jaskiniowego trola. To metalowy model, jeden z bodajże trzech wariantów, jakie ukazały się zimą 2001 r.  Model oparty jest, rzecz jasna, na wizji z filmowej adaptacji Petera Jacksona. W skrócie – wielki, głupi i bardzo, bardzo zły.
O samym malowaniu nie wiem, niestety, praktycznie nic – może mój brat wypowie się w komentarzu, a może opisze to w notce z kolejnym większym monstrum z Morii.
Mormeg has painted first of its larger monsters for Sauron’s army of orcs, goblins and all kind of nasty creatures – cave troll. This is metal miniature, one of three trolls which were released back in the winter of 2001. Miniature is based, of course, on the one shown in Peter Jackson’s movie. In short – big, stupid and very, very angry.

I can not tell too much about painting, I’m afraid – maybe my brother will write short description in the comments, or – maybe – this part will be left for a note showing next cave monster of Moria.


WIP: Archaon, the Everchosen Part 2

Posted on April 26th, 2016 under , , , , , , , , , . Posted by

Above is Archaon after a few hours under the airbrush. Below you will find how he became that way. Enjoy!One by one the heads were toned out and bagged up.Then I had to commit to a color for the body. It had to be something neutral but I also wanted to…

Black Library Newsletter

Posted on April 26th, 2016 under , , , , , . Posted by

Something new from the Black Library…

© Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2016. GW, Games Workshop, Black Library, The Horus Heresy, Space Marine, 40K, Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000, Age of Sigmar, Stormcast Eternal and all associated logos, illustrations, images, names, creatures, races, vehicles, locations, weapons, characters, and the distinctive likenesses thereof, are either ® or TM, and/or © Games Workshop Limited, variably registered around the world. All Rights Reserved.

Games Workshop Ltd, Willow Road, Lenton, Nottingham, NG7 2WS
Registered in England and Wales –  Company No. 01467092. VAT No. GB 580853421

Our mailing address is:
contact @blacklibrary.com

Imperial Knight – in manufactorum pt 12

Posted on April 26th, 2016 under , , . Posted by

Its a bit difficult at the moment to actually collate what I’m up to as I’m doing three or four things in any one painting session. So it’s difficult to show progress and we’re already at part 12 of this Knight. Anyway, I moved on with the chest plate …

Skryba Chaosu: Wywiad z Mikem Bruntonem

Posted on April 24th, 2016 under , , , , , . Posted by

Jeden z ostatnich wywiadów z ludźmi ze starej ekipy Games Workshop, oryginalnie opublikowany przez Orlygga na blogu Realm of Chaos 80s.
Ponad rok temu rozpocząłem serię wywiadów z ludźmi, którzy brali udział w projekcie Realm of Chaos. Myślałem wtedy, że znajdę jednego czy dwóch pracowników GW zainteresowanych taką rozmową, powiedzą coś, co zmieści się w akapicie czy dwóch. Nie miałem pojęcia, że ten pomysł przemieni się cały łańcuch długich wywiadów (w chwili, gdy piszę te słowa, jest już ich piętnaście), a udział w nim wezmą ludzie od Bryana Ansella do Tony’ego Hougha. Znalazł się jednak ktoś, kogo trudno było namierzyć. Właśnie ta osoba jest bohaterem dzisiejszej, szesnastej rozmowy – Mike Brunton. To właśnie on napisał ostateczną wersję “Slaves to Darkness” i do obrazu całości od dawna brakowało jego opowieści.
Przewijamy teraz do wydarzeń sprzed kilku tygodniu – rozmawiałem wówczas z Graemem Davisem o pewnych materiałach z WFRP, kiedy zasugerował, by zapytać Mike’a o udzielenie wywiadu. Jak możecie sobie wyobrazić, nie mogłem wypuścić takiej okazji z rąk, kilka godzin później byłem już w kontakcie z bohaterem poniższego tekstu i wszystko potoczyło się w normalny sposób.
Tak więc, bez zbędnego ględzenia, oddaję klucze do tego małego zakątka cyberprzestrzeni Mike’owi, który przedstawi nam swoją historię. Miłej lektury.
RoC80s: Jak, w twoim wypadku, zaczęła się fascynacja światem gier fantasy? “Władca Pierścieni”? Robert E. Howard? D&D?
MB: Zacząłem jako gracz tradycyjnych gier wojennych, w dużej mierze dzięki żołnierzykom Airfixa. Znalezienie pudełkowego zestawu “Dungeons & Dragons” w sklepie z grami bitewnymi w Bradford było szczęśliwym trafem. W jaki sposób trafiło tam drewniane pudło pierwszego wydania? No cóż, była to jedna z gier, w które grałem zamiast odrabiać lekcje z greki i łaciny. Fantasy pojawiło się też dlatego, że mniej więcej w tym czasie przeczytałem wszystko, co napisał Michael Moorcock, ale już samo granie w bitewniaki wystarczy do przypięcia komuś łatki dziwaka. Zainteresowanie grami i D&D oznaczało, że byłeś nerdem i dziwakiem w czasach, gdy nawet angielskie słowo nerd nie oznaczało jeszcze obelgi. Prawdę mówiąc, jestem trochę zdziwiony, że w telewizji nie ma jeszcze żadnego serialu o przygodach pary detektywów, Nerdy i Odd, niespecjalnie dopasowanych, ale lubiących się nawzajem. W D&D zacząłem regularnie grać w klubie miłośników gier w Huddersfield w 1978 r., naprawdę mocno złapałem bakcyla. Tim Kirby, na długo nim został kimś ważnym w GW, regularnie i znakomicie prowadził sesje w tym klubie.
Magazyn, w którym początkowo pracowała znakomita większość zespołu WFRP – oczywiście, poza nimi pracowały nad nim także inne osoby.
RoC80s: Jeśli mnie pamięć nie myli, zacząłeś pracować dla TSR, pracowałeś też w magazynie Imagine. Co zapamiętałeś z brytyjskiej sceny D&D z wczesnych lat osiemdziesiątych?
MB: Pracę w TSR rozpocząłem, ponieważ potrzebowali malarza figurek, zajmowałem się też ich systemem komputerowym. Nigdy nie odmówiłem pracy związanej z grami. Zacząłem więc pracować, Tim Kirby już wcześniej pracował w TSR i pamiętał, że byłem ponadprzeciętnym graczem D&D i wcale nie najgorszym malarzem figurek (poproszono mnie mniej więcej w tym czasie, żebym już nie startował w konkursach malarskich na Games Day, bo za dużo ich wygrałem).
Pamiętam głównie, jak bardzo niekorporacyjnie wyglądało wszystko w tych czasach. Gry to był przemysł garażowy. Wszyscy znali wszystkich, choćby pobieżnie. Kev Adams, dla przykładu, wpadał co jakiś czas – lubił po prostu pogadać o grach (to było jeszcze zanim został rzeźbiarzem figurek). Biznes wyglądał tak, a nie inaczej, ponieważ byliśmy graczami, którzy mieli szczęście, że płacono nam za robotę przy grach.
Kolejny przykład. TSR kiedyś udostępniało do gier biuro w Cambridge, od czasu do czasu, w soboty. Chodziłem tam, żeby otworzyć pomieszczenia i trochę rozruszać sam początek spotkania. To nie miało nic wspólnego z handlem, po prostu dzień poświęcony na spotkanie z innymi ludźmi mającymi te same zainteresowania, parę godzin zabawy nad D&D przy chińszczyźnie zza rogu. Pamiętam jakąś mamę, która dostarczyła swojego syna na takie spotkanie, dziękując za zainteresowanie go czytaniem i matematyką, jeśli dobrze pamiętam, miał jakieś problemy z nauką. Chciał czytać i rachować, żeby mógł grać, więc jego nauka z pewnością na tym nie ucierpiała. A mama, kiedy już stwierdziła, że synek nie zostanie złożony w ofierze przez grupę jakichś dziwaków, z przyjemnością poszła sobie na zakupy. Dziś niewiele firm zaprasza ludzi do siebie, żeby sobie pograli.
W końcu skończyłem pracując nad Imagine. A teraz czas na małe wyznanie winy: nie zawsze podpisywałem się swoim nazwiskiem pod artykułami. Radośnie poinformowano mnie, “Koleś, za często jesteś w druku”, trzeba było więc przyjąć jakiś pseudonim. Albo dwa. Albo nawet więcej. Pisałem więc pod nazwiskiem, a także jako “Mark Burroughs” i jako “Fiona Lloyd” – między innymi. Ten ostatni pseudonim wywołał spore poruszenie między czytelnikami (dziewczyna! dziewczyna gra w erpegi! O rany!). Jak się okazało, miałem też smykałkę do czytania nowych gier i pisania małych, szybkich przygód. I właśnie dlatego na moim biurku lądowały, powiedzmy, “Star Frontiers”, “Marvel Super Heroes” czy “Bushido” i dostawałem góra kilka dni na napisanie jakiejś przygody czy minimodułu do gry, której nigdy wcześniej nie widziałem na oczy.
A parę tygodni potem schemat powtarzał się z inną, nową grą. Autorzy zewnętrzni, piszący takie rzeczy w ramach hobby, w życiu nie zgodziliby się na takie terminy. Ale w sumie presja czasowa wychodziła na dobre, dzięki temu dostałem notkę autorską obok Michaela Moorcocka, z czego do dziś się śmieję. Dało mi to też solidne podstawy do późniejszych zajęć, no ale wówczas o tym nie wiedziałem.
Kopie tego mają dość wysoką cenę!

RoC80s: Czy “Up the Garden Path” było twoim jedynym modułem napisanym dla TSR?
MB: Był to jedyny “prawdziwy” moduł, do powstania którego się przyczyniłem, ponieważ nie należałem do grupy projektowej TSR UK. Kiedy Imagine padło, zajmowałem się głównie marketingiem. To prawdopodobnie jednak bardziej mój wkład, niż Graema Morrisa, uwidacznia się w ogólnym poziomie głupoty tego modułu. Graeme był świetnym facetem, ale nie dawał się ponieść głupawce. Moduł powstał jako przygoda promocyjna, dostaliśmy więc zielone światło na dużą dawkę surrealizmu, znacznie większą, niż w normalnych dodatkach produkowanych przez TSR. “Up the Garden Path” jest dziś znane z dwóch powodów – niemal nikt go nie widział (ze względu na niewielki nakład) i z powodu nadzwyczaj wysokiej ceny, kiedy już jakiś egzemplarz trafi do obiegu. Dzięki tej wyjątkowości mogłem kupić spory zapas pieluszek, gdy były mi potrzebne, dlatego jestem z niego naprawdę dumny. Pisanie go było fajną zabawą, został też świetnie zilustrowany przez Jesa Goodwina (jak widzicie, ten przemysł wtedy był naprawdę niewielki, wszyscy znali wszystkich). Nie miałem okazji napisać niczego innego, ponieważ odszedłem z TSR jeszcze przed wydaniem “Up the Garden Path”. W tym czasie w firmie nie pracowało już również jakieś dwie trzecie oryginalnego zespołu autorów. Większość rzeczy, jakie napisałem dla TSR, ukazała się w Imagine. A o tym napisałem już wcześniej.
W TSR robiłem wiele rzeczy trudnych do dostrzeżenia, pisałem mnóstwo reklam, odpowiadałem na pytania dotyczące zasad. To ostatnie, prawdę mówiąc, było mocno czasochłonne. Polityka narzucona z góry była jasna – każde pytanie o zasady musi otrzymać spersonalizowaną odpowiedź. To były czasu jeszcze sprzed poczty elektronicznej, więc na moim biurku wiecznie widać było górę listów. Codziennie zajmowałem się tymi odpowiedziami, choćby po trochu, ale ze względu na rosnącą sprzedaż gry kupa listów praktycznie nie malała, nawet kiedy odpowiadałem coraz szybciej na te wszystkie pytania Mistrzów Podziemi, prowadzących graczy uzbrojonych w “Trójzęby Zabijania Wszystkiego +57”. Mam nadzieję, że nie zepsułem nikomu za bardzo rozgrywek swoimi kiepskimi interpretacjami zasad, ale w przepisach zawsze były jakieś luki, które kreatywni gracze i mistrzowie mogli wykorzystywać do swych potrzeb. Niektóre z tych dziur były naprawdę potężne…
RoC80s: Czy przeskoczyłeś do GW wraz z Paulem Cockburnem w 1986 r., czy też twoje przejście do firmy prowadzonej przez Bryana Ansella wyglądało jakoś inaczej?
MB: O ile dobrze wiem, w latach 1985-86 skończyła się kasa w TSR w Ameryce, poinstruowano nas, żeby przygotować się na trudne czasy. Gary Gygax i rodzina Blume toczyli też ze sobą poważny spór. W Wielkiej Brytanii Don Turnbull zdecydował się przenieść najpierw ile się da kosztów do Imagine, a potem zamknąć pismo. Na papierze musiało to wyglądać jako niezła oszczędność, a…. no dobra, nie mówmy źle o martwych. Po wysłaniu do druku ostatniego numeru, cała załoga pisma została wezwana na dywanik, gdzie otrzymała wypowiedzenie. Kilka godzin później ktoś zorientował się, że wylano też mnie, gościa, który pisał wszystkie reklamy i ogłoszenia. Posłano więc po mnie z powrotem, bo ja, jak to ja, stwierdziłem, że wypowiedzenie to wypowiedzenie i poszedłem sobie do pubu. Skończyło się więc na tym, że wylali wszystkich, poza mną.
Paul zaczął wtedy wydawać GamesMastera. Napisałem do tego pisma kilka rzeczy (a raczej napisała ta fajna laska, Fiana Lloyd), żeby mu pomóc. A potem pojechał do Nottingham i GW, i to by było na tyle. No, w zasadzie prawie na tyle.
Pierwszą osobą, która bezpośrednio z TSR UK przeszła do GW to, zdaje się, Tom Kirby. Jim Bambra, Phil Gallagher i Graeme Morris zorganizowali swoją własną wyprawę do Nottingham, by porozmawiać z GW o przeniesieniu się jako zespół. Przejście Toma było dla nich dużym szokiem, bo wywierał on naprawdę duży wpływ na przygody do D&D produkowane w Wielkiej Brytanii. Zapytałem, czy mogę jechać z nimi. Nie spodziewałem się, prawdę mówiąc, specjalnych efektów tej podróży, ale GW zaproponowało pracę również i mi. Jakoś nie widziałem przyszłości w pisaniu reklam dla TSR, przyjąłem więc ofertę. A biorąc pod uwagę, jak duża była ta migracja w stronę Nottingham, Don Turnbull był nieco…uprzedzony wobec wszystkich, którzy się przenosili. A pamiętajmy, że wszyscy byliśmy dobrymi znajomymi.|
Jedyna osoba, która w końcu została w TSR, to Graeme Morris, który miał ku temu ważne powody. I on i jego żona byli archeologami, chcieli zostać w Cambridge, by utrzymać bliskie kontakty z wydziałem archeologii na uniwersytecie. Jak się nad tym zastanawiam, to w grach pracowało wtedy sporo archeologów. Jestem pewny, że byli nimi Graeme Morris, Graeme Davis, Rick Priestley i Nigel Stillman.
84 numer White Dwarfa, pierwszy pod redakcją Mike’a. Fantastyczna okładka Iana Millera, widać nawet, że chodzi o Boże Narodzenie!
RoC80s: Przez jakiś czas byłeś redaktorem naczelnym White Dwarfa, co pamiętasz z tych czasów, gdy stałeś u steru tego pisma?
MB: Głównie to, że było mnóstwo roboty. I że Paul Cockburn z wielką ulgą pozbywał się pisma na rzecz kogoś innego. Nie podskakiwał korytarzem idąc do swojego nowego biura, ale był blisko tego. Praca nad White Dwarfem w studio w Nottingham była uważana za kiepskie zajęcie. To było coś, co musiało być robione, ale praktycznie rzecz biorąc każda inna robota była uważana zarówno za fajniejszą, jak i za znacznie ciekawszą. To zresztą, w pewien sposób, była w sumie prawda. Pismo musiało przecież ukazywać się regularnie (nuda). Gry pudełkowe i podręczniki to było naprawdę “coś”, jeśli chodzi o proces wydawania, zwłaszcza, że ukazywały się relatywnie rzadko. Mówiąc innymi słowy, praca nad pismem to była, cóż, praca, ponieważ były terminy, natomiast gry to była “fajna zabawa”.
Wcześniejsza przeprowadzka z Londynu była raczej… trudna. Wciąż było po niej mnóstwo rzeczy do zrobienia. Trzeba było przejrzeć setki artykułów, nadesłanych przez zewnętrznych autorów. Ostatecznie, musiałem przejrzeć to wszystko naprawdę krytycznie, choćby po to, żeby mieć trochę miejsca w pokoju. Mnóstwo tych tekstów nie przeszło sita, choć – gdyby było więcej czasu, część może by została skierowana do druku. W końcu udało mi się jednak przekopać przez wszystko na tyle, że White Dwarf ukazywał się co miesiąc bez specjalnych problemów. Musiałem jednak odwołać się do swojego sprytu – co miesiąc przygotowywałem parę stron więcej, żeby mieć gotowy spory zapas na wypadek jakichś problemów. Ostatecznie okazało się, że zmarnowałem w ten sposób tylko czas, podjęto bowiem decyzję, by publikować materiały jedynie o produktach GW. Cóż, takie życie.
Co było dobre? Miałem, w zasadzie, swobodę doboru większości materiałów. Oczywiście, były strony zarezerwowane dla produktów i figurek GW, ale reszta była, w sumie, zależna wyłącznie ode mnie. Oznaczało to, że mogłem pisać o grach takich jak “Paranoia”, “Judge Dredd” i AD&D (które w czasie, kiedy zajmowałem się White Dwarfem, nadal były publikowane przez GW). Patrząc z perspektywy czasu miałem chyba dziecięcą radochę z publikowania takich rzeczy, jak przygody do “Paranoi” bez map czy drukowane do góry nogami. Wydawało mi się, że wpisuje się to w ogólny poziom szaleństwa tej gry i w sumie dostałem sporo listów od ludzi, którzy uważali to za zabawne.
Co dla mnie było złe? Cóż, już wtedy, w czasach przedinternetowych zorientowałem się, że można być nielubianym/nienawidzonym/pogardzanym (usunąć to co konieczne) za to, że wykonuje się swoje obowiązki. To nie była, co prawda, uniwersalna opinia, ale całkiem liczne grono czytelników z radością przyszłoby na mój pogrzeb. A przecież nawet mnie nie znali! Niezależnie od tego, co pojawiłoby się w piśmie, ktoś był szczerze przekonany, że to zamach na jego życie i prawa, bo ukazuje się za dużo (albo za mało) rzeczy do gry X czy Y. W końcu zdałem sobie sprawę, że tutaj nie mogłem wygrać. Zresztą nikt nigdy nie mógł. No i w sumie, niezadowoleni czytelnicy nie posunęli się nigdy do życzenia mi śmierci, za co jestem im dziś wdzięczny.
Kiedy skończyłem prowadzenie pisma, nastąpiła zmiana dyrekcji i usunięto wszelkie materiały dotyczące gier nie należących do GW. Zmiana zawartości pisma i redaktora naczelnego (do widzenia mój drogi) były ze sobą powiązane. Uważałem, że to błąd, jako że zarówno nakład, jak i przychody z reklam rosły. Ale WD jakoś udało się wychodzić jeszcze kilkaset numerów.
Rozkładówka ze “Slaves to Darkness”. Widzicie Mike’a?
RoC80s: Byłeś głównym autorem “Realms of Chaos: Slaves to Darkness”. Rick Priestley napisał o tym projekcie, że “poległo na nim wielu autorów”. Jak udało ci odnieść sukces tam, gdzie inni zawiedli?
MB: To, że się udało, to zasługa (a) “papierosów, whiskey i szalonych kobiet”; (b) długich godzin spędzonych na ślęczeniu nad klawiaturą i ślepego losu; albo też (c) nadal to piszę, a to wszystko to tylko sen. Podejrzewam, tak naprawdę, że to głównie opcja (b) z odrobiną (a).
Zanim na moim biurku wylądował projekt “Realm of Chaos”, miałem wrażenie, że nagle wszyscy autorzy i redaktorzy albo musieli szybko gdzieś wyjść, albo sprawiali wrażenie niezwykle ciężko zapracowanych. “Realm of Chaos” miał dla nas pewne cechy samospełniającej się przepowiedni – to było okropne zadanie, ponieważ uważaliśmy je za takie. Miałem trochę obaw, ale tak naprawdę byłem zadowolony, że mam do napisania coś większego (kurde, bardzo dużego), niż wstępniak do White Dwarfa. To nie było tak, że nie było niczego przede mną: Graeme Davis był ostatnim z rzędu próbujących dokonać wejścia północą ścianą Góry NajeżonegoKolcamiChaosu, ale nie starczyło mu pary, zapału i herbaty. W tym wstępnym szkicu było, przykładowo, bardzo dużo sensownych pomysłów na mutacje jego autorstwa. A potem zrobił jakoś tak, że po prostu był niezbędny przy jakichś innych projektach. Miał łeb, ten Graeme. Były też jakieś inne wstępne szkice, które, jak się okazało, całkiem odpowiadały Bryanowi. Nie było więc tak, jak mówię, że zaczynałem od zera: to było raczej jak poważna obróbka mocno zaniedbanego materiału.
Trzeba też pamiętać, że “Realm of Chaos” to było ukochane dziecko Bryana, od początku do końca. Dziecko pokryte wymiocinami, robalami, z mackami zamiast ramion i oczami na wypustkach, ale – mimo wszystko – jego dziecko. Znaczyło to, że niezależnie od tego jaka wersja książki zostałaby przez kogoś napisana, nigdy nie dorównałaby temu, co Bryan miał w swojej głowie. Nigdy. Nie było na to szansy. W idealnym świecie napisałby ją sam, ale był raczej zajęty prowadzeniem GW i to było, w sumie, trochę ważniejsze dla nas wszystkich.
Bryan z pewnością usiłował przekazać, czego oczekuje, spotykaliśmy się co tydzień, żeby o tym rozmawiać. Robiłem notatki, a potem pędziłem do swojego kącika, by spędzić kilka kolejne dni pisząc nowe rzeczy. Bryan lubił też pojawiać się w biurze redakcyjnym, usadawiał się na starej sofie i po prostu gadał ze wszystkimi w pobliżu na rozmaite tematy. Czasami nawet o “Realm of Chaos”. W czasie naszych cotygodniowych spotkań rozkładał moją twórczość na elementy składowe, albo był na tyle zadowolony, że omawialiśmy kolejny fragment. Tutaj właśnie przydało się moje doświadczenie z szybkiego pisania na zadane tematy dla Imagine. Pamiętam, że jeśli chodzi o rzeczy związane z Warhammerem 40K, jak Herezja Horusa czy Szarzy Rycerze, miałem dużo swobody, ale starałem się, by to, co napisałem, było podobne w nastroju i tonie do rzeczy z WFB. Zdarzało się, że kiedy coś pisałem, Bryan zmieniał zdanie, trzeba też pamiętać, że zamawiano grafiki do książki. To co pisałem, musiało odpowiadać tym naprawdę dobrym. Wydaje mi się, że napisałem trochę całkiem niezłych fragmentów, jak małe teksty, które towarzyszyły mrocznym, ponurym ilustracjom Iana Millera w każdym rozdziale.
Ostatecznie, mam wrażenie, że to co powstało, było wystarczająco dobre wobec tego, czego oczekiwał, by iść do druku pod tym tytułem. Podejrzewam jednak, że – tak naprawdę – Bryan zawsze chciał czegoś odrobinę innego, trochę lepszego, bliższego jego (jakakolwiek by nie była) wizji tej krainy. To byłoby prawdziwe “królestwo Chaosu”. Nie mam z tym problemu. I tak dostał wielką, budzącą podziw książkę, która wyprzedała się praktycznie natychmiast. Co dziwne, wciąż uważana jest za całkiem przyzwoitą. Wtedy też wydawała mi się niezłym osiągnięciem, ale naprawdę, miałem wrażenie, że ludzie będą ją lubić i tyle. Nic więcej. Znajdzie się zaraz coś nowszego i ciekawszego.
Muszę też powiedzieć, że kiedy, w końcu, przelałem na papier te setki tysięcy słów, nie chciałem już nigdy mieć do czynienia z żadnymi mackami. Nigdy. Nie pamiętam też, żebyśmy jakoś specjalnie świętowali wydanie tej książki – ot, do studia trafiła kolejna paczka z podręcznikiem, żadnych gratulacji. Czułem się trochę rozczarowany.
Długo trwało, nim zdałem sobie sprawę, że tak naprawdę nie ma to znaczenia, ponieważ przez bardzo długi czas zajmowałem się czymś naprawdę trudnym. Jakiś rok temu wróciłem do tego i przeczytałem książkę jeszcze raz, to było w czasie kiedy planowano wydanie Warhammera w serii Total War (pracowałem nad tym w owym czasie). Po dwudziestu paru latach stwierdziłem, że zrobiłem naprawdę niezłą robotę, biorąc pod uwagę wszystkie okoliczności.
RoC80s: Czy przypominasz sobie nad jakimi materiałami do RoC pracowałeś? Czy raczej była to praca redakcyjna nad tekstem?
MB: Pamiętam, że napisałem większość tekstu do “Slaves to Darkness”, z wyjątkiem kilku list armii i części o malowaniu. Wiem, że napisałem też część list armijnych do WH40K, ponieważ niektórzy z Kosmicznych Marines Chaosu są uzbrojeni w zaostrzone kije (tym, w sumie, są narzędzia do kontrolowania pomiotów Chaosu). To głupie, więc najprawdopodobniej to moje dzieło, wymyślone w trakcie któregoś długiego, mrocznego popołudnia spędzonego nad tym tekstowym koszmarem. Niestety, nie pamiętam nic bardziej szczegółowego, ponieważ tekst ma kilka milionów słów, a powstał parędziesiąt lat temu.
Mojego autorstwa jest także pierwszy niemal kompletny szkic do “Lost and the Damned”, choć wtedy moje zainteresowanie całym tym Chaosem i kolcami nieco już zmalało. Autorem redakcji obu książek był Simon Forrest, więc wszystko, co jest napisane prawidłowo, to jego zasługa. Moje palce były już całkowicie sztywne!
Potem zająłem się trochę “Necromundą”, grą o walkach gangów osadzoną w świecie WH40K (w wersji, nad którą pracowałem). Moja wersja trafiła na półkę, ale zaraz potem nadeszła ciekawa możliwość utrzymania WFRP przy życiu pod postacią Flame Publications. Podejrzewam, że gdyby nie Flame, WFRP byłby kolejnym produktem opuszczonym przez GW. Choć gra była popularna sama w sobie, pamiętam pogłoski, że według ówczesnych, wewnętrznych standardów naszej firmy nie można było mówić o niej jako o sukcesie, który mierzony był, głównie, sprzedażą figurek. Rolplejowcy nie kupowali, po prostu, armii miniaturek, a koszt napisania książki związanej z grą fabularną był taki sam, jaki podręcznika do gry bitewnej, który wiązał się ze sprzedażą mnóstwa figurek.
RoC80s: Pomogłeś założyć Flame i pracowałeś nad dodatkami do WFRP. W jaki sposób dokładniej działało wówczas studio i nad czym pracowałeś?
MB: “Studio” to bardzo wielka nazwa na opisanie Flame. Już mi się podoba. Było nas trzech (Tony Ackland, Graeme Davis i ja), mieliśmy wielki słój kawy rozpuszczalnej i komputer Apple Macintosh. No i mnóstwo ukierunkowanego zapału do roboty, całkiem niezłą miejscówę do przesiadywania w pobliżu i chęć pokazania naszym szanownym kolegom, czego można dokonać bez tej całej biurokracji. I nie, nie nazwaliśmy swojego maca. Umiejscowiliśmy się w kilku pokojach w całkiem fajnym domu w stylu georgiańskim, z dala od głównego studio GW, z Marauder Miniatures Aly’ego i Trishy Morrisonów w pomieszczeniach na piętrze. To było bardzo “GW usiłujące nie wyglądać na GW”. Patrząc wstecz widzę, że powstanie tych małych firemek było, po prostu, praktycznie bezkosztowym eksperymentem głównego Studia.
Pomysł leżący u podstaw Flame Publications był prosty. Nasza trójka miała dostarczać książkę co osiem tygodni i – co miesiąc – osiem stron do White Dwarfa. Mieliśmy w budżecie mały zapas na robienie map, gdyby były nam potrzebne. Mieliśmy dostarczać gotowe produkty do druku – po redakcji, złożone, mające minimum 64 strony objętości (ze względu na charakter druku, wszystkie dodatkowe strony musiały mieć objętość wielokrotności ośmiu). Cena podręcznika miała zaczynać się od 6,99 GBP lub odpowiednika w innej walucie (czyli miały być tanie, możliwe do kupienia z kieszonkowego, biorąc pod uwagę harmonogram publikacji i zawartość, uważam że była to znakomita relacja jakości do ceny). Spodziewano się od nas, że wpływy ze sprzedaży pokryją nasze koszty, a książki będą wyprzedawane do zera. Dzięki temu chciano uniknąć wiązania pieniędzy w towarze. Sami mieliśmy zajmować się sprzedażą wysyłkową naszych produktów. Prawdę mówiąc, te warunki nie były niczym strasznym. Główne studio GW zajmowało się drukiem naszych rzeczy, choć akurat ten proces nie zawsze przebiegał bezboleśnie. Gotowy do druku materiał zaginął kiedyś pomiędzy studiem a drukarnią. Ktoś (nigdy nie dowiedziałem się kto), zadecydował wówczas, żeby drukować z kserokopii tych materiałów, zamiast poprosić nas o nową wersję oryginału. Gotowa książka wyglądała fatalnie. 
Flame radziła sobie tak dobrze, jak radziła, ponieważ cała nasza trójka chciała tam pracować, wiedzieliśmy, że możemy polegać na sobie, że niczego nie spieprzymy. Narzuciliśmy sobie dość bezlitosny harmonogram, by móc zmieścić się w zadanych terminach. Najważniejsze dla tego wszystkiego było wykorzystanie maszyn, żeby odwalały za nas tyle ciężkiej roboty, ile tylko możliwe. Macintosh i jego oprogramowanie do składu był genialny, dzięki temu udawało nam się tyle zrobić.
Mieliśmy też Amstrada PC (straszna, straszna maszynka, ale korzystało z nich wówczas GW), z którego przenosiliśmy tekst na Maca, wykorzystywaliśmy też go do zastępowania tagów formatujących tekst na odpowiadające im tagi wykorzystywane w DTP. Tekst był wstukiwany, potem redagowany przez Graema lub mnie, a następnie mogłem go zedytować w kilkadziesiąt minut tak, że wychodziła z niego wersja składu mająca 64 strony w druku. Potem już tylko grafika, wstawienie map, ułożenie wszystkiego żeby dobrze wyglądało. Najbardziej czasochłonny był proces końcowego układania layoutu, sprawdzania, czy tekst dobrze wlewa się automatycznie, czy strony nie wyglądają źle, nie są zbyt zapchane. Chcieliśmy, żeby nasze książki były naprawdę przydatne w grze, by używano ich aż do rozpadnięcia się. Nie chcieliśmy, by kupowano je i odstawiano na półkę.
Mieliśmy dostęp do wszystkich grafik Tony’ego, zrobionych do Warhammera, było ich mnóstwo. Choć ludzie zapewne tego nie zauważyli, prawie wszystkie mniejsze grafiki w książkach Flame były wycięte z większych ilustracji jego autorstwa. Oznaczało to, że mieliśmy czas na zrobienie kilku dużych, stronicowych lub nawet dwustronicowych ilustracji, które miały duże znaczenie dla tekstu. Reszta grafik pochodziła z zapasów. Tony był też świetny w obróbce i obsłudze tego archiwum, co przy ówczesnym sprzęcie nie należało do rzeczy prostych. Teraz, oczywiście, to inna sprawa, z Photoshopem i pierdyliardem innych programów. Wtedy, w czasach o których mówimy, nie było to aż tak proste.
System działał na tyle dobrze, że doszliśmy do etapu, w którym zawsze dysponowaliśmy produktem zapasowym, gotowym już do druku, w momencie kończenie dwumiesięcznego cyklu produkcyjnego. Nalegałem na ten zapas na wypadek zachorowania któregoś z nas, jakiegoś wypadku lub czegoś równie głupiego. O ile mnie pamięć nie myli, daliśmy radę zrobić dodatek o tworzeniu bohaterów, przerobiliśmy cztery książki kampanii “Kamienie Zagłady” na WFRP (nieźle się bawiłem projektując papierowe kryształy do samodzielnego zrobienia), kompendium zawierające rozmaite materiały, przeróbki jakichś innych przygód, zaczęliśmy prace nad przygotowaniem do druku dodatku Realms of Magic Kena Rolstona i rozpoczęliśmy wstępną obróbkę drugiego wydania gry fabularnej “Judge Dredd”. Całkiem nieźle jak na trzech pracowników! Dostarczyliśmy też mnóstwo materiałów do opublikowania w White Dwarfie, czasami więcej niż wymagane od nas osiem stron. Jeśli mi czegoś brakowało, to pisania własnych rzeczy, nie było na to czasu przy tej całej robocie redakcyjnej i związanej z produkcją, czy też zajmowaniu się sprawami związanymi z prowadzeniem firmą. Pamiętam też jakiś ranek, gdy zjawiła się u nas policja w sprawie jakiejś szemranej firemki pod nami, której trzeba było wyjaśnić, że nie mamy z nimi nic wspólnego i nie, nie mogą zabrać naszych komputerów.
Tak czy siak, wszystko dla mnie skończyło się wraz z odejściem Graeme Davisa, który przeprowadził się do Stanów. Zmusiło mnie to do zastanowienia się nad sobą, doszedłem do wniosku, że nigdzie nie dojdę w GW. Przeszedłem więc do MicroProse i wszedłem w cudowny świat gier komputerowych. Tony zawsze był bezpieczny w GW, nie musiałem się więc martwić, że zostaje. Starano się jeszcze utrzymać Flame, ale nie udało się.
Kilka miesięcy później biuro MicroProse UK wyglądało jak obóz uchodźców z GW, pracowali tam bowiem Graeme Davis, Jim Bambra i Steve Hand. W 1991 r. w Wielkiej Brytanii naprawdę nie było zbyt wielu doświadczonych producentów gier. Teraz jest ich znacznie więcej, ale mam farta, że nadal się tym zajmuję, projektuję gry i mam z tego radochę.
Chciałbym, jak zawsze, podziękować Mikeowi za czas, który poświęcił dla nas, wspominając przeszłę lata. To musi być dziwne uczucie, gdy znienacka kontaktuje się z tobą jakiś dziwny, nieznany facet, który chce pogadać o rzeczach, jakie robiłeś ćwierć wieku temu. Na szczęście Mike’owi nie przeszkodziło to w odpowiedzeniu na moje dość przypadkowe pytania.
Jestem pewny, że też jesteście mu wdzięczni. I mega dzięki dla Graeme Davisa, który pomógł w skontaktowaniu się z Mikem!
Orlygg

Przedwieczny licz | An ancient liche

Posted on April 23rd, 2016 under , , , , , . Posted by

Od paru tygodni nie mam, niestety, czasu na dłuższe siedzenie nad figurkami. Moi wojownicy Ashen Circle Głosicieli Słowa czekają na co najmniej parę godzin wolnego, a ja maluję, w rzadkich wolnych chwilach, miniaturki, które nie są tak czasochłonne. Staram się wybrać ze swojej kolekcji figurek serii Night Horrors takie, które można wykorzystać we Frostgrave (pierwszym był pokazywany niedawno pomniejszy demon, czyli diaboł). 

Dzisiaj pokazywanego licza pomalowałem 25 lat temu, stwierdziłem jednak, że moje ówczesne pomysły nie do końca mi dziś odpowiadają. Figurka powędrowała do czyszczenia, a wkrótce potem znalazłem jakieś 20-30 minut na jej pomalowanie. Prosty schemat, malowany głównie czarnym washem i farbą Charadon Granite, cieniowanie, czy też “eteryczny” blask, jak wolę o nim myśleć, robiony Nihlakh Oxide. 
Figurka ma już swoje lata, ukazała się – w tej wersji – w roku 1985, jednak już wcześniej była dostępna jako składowa zestawu Dungeon Monsters Starter Set z 1983 r. – z drobną różnicą, nosiła wówczas miano Spectre i w uniesionej dłoni trzymała sztylet. W moim egzemplarzu widoczne są zresztą ślady usuwania tej broni przed zrobieniem figurki mastera do odlewania. Sam odlew nie jest zresztą najlepszy, na szaty widoczne są jakieś wżery, kościane dłonie i czaszka pozbawione są praktycznie jakichkolwiek szczegółów. Nie szkodzi – mam sentyment do tej figurki, przez parę lat odgrywała rolę mojego głównodowodzącego, a i teraz posłuży, mam nadzieję, w scenariuszach do Frostgrave.

I don’t have much time for painting for last four or five weeks unfortunately. My Ashen Circle warriors sit patiently waiting for my few hours of free time and I paint, in some free minutes, miniatuers which are nowhere so time-consuming. I searched through my collection of old Night Horrors series for miniatures, which may be used in Frostgrafe – first of them was Pit Fiend, shown few days ago.

Today’s liche was already painted by me some 25 years ago, but I decided to repaint this miniature, as I don’t really like my old ideas and painting anymore. Miniature was stripped and then painted in just 20 or 30 minutes. Very simple paint scheme, black wash and Charadon Granite paint over white basecoat. Highlights, or “ethereal” glow, as I like to think about it, was glazed over with multiple layers of very thin Nihlakh Oxide.

Miniature has its years and this is clearly visible. It has simplistic design and is casted in rather crude way. It’s no wonder, as it was released in 1985… And its first version, named as a Spectre, was available since 1983 in the boxed set labelled as Dungeon Monsters Starter Set. There was a difference though, as the original miniature was wielding a dagger. Marks of weapon removal are obvious on my miniature and I suspect that master miniature for “Liche” version was made from old metal miniature, not original sculpt. Cast is rather poor, as I already mentioned, my miniature has got some holes on the front and skull and bony hands are very, very simple. It doesn’t matter really – I like this old liche, he was leading my undead army for few years and it will be used again – in Frostgrave games I think.


Warhammer Digital Newsletter

Posted on April 23rd, 2016 under , , , , , . Posted by

Some new eBooks from Warhammer Digital…

 

 

Facebook
Website
© Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2016. GW, Games Workshop, Black Library, The Horus Heresy, Space Marine, 40K, Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000, Age of Sigmar, Stormcast Eternal and all associated logos, illustrations, images, names, creatures, races, vehicles, locations, weapons, characters, and the distinctive likenesses thereof, are either ® or TM, and/or © Games Workshop Limited, variably registered around the world. All Rights Reserved.

Games Workshop Limited, Willow Road, Lenton, Nottingham, NG7 2WS Registered in England and Wales – Company No. 01467092. VAT No. GB 580853421

Our mailing address is:
digital@gwplc.com

Games Workshop Newsletter

Posted on April 23rd, 2016 under , , , . Posted by

The new look for the Orks (or ‘Orruks’ as they are now) in Age of Sigmar is certainly interesting…not sure I’m a fan personally…

Games Workshop
Warhammer Age of Sigmar Warhammer 40,000 Books & Digital
Gordrakk, Fist of Gork...
...leads his rabble into the fray!
Last Chance to Buy - when they're gone, they're gone!
 
Webstore Blog - Your daily dose of hobby joy from the Webstore Team. Read it here.
© Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2016. GW, Games Workshop, Citadel, White Dwarf, Space Marine, 40K, Warhammer, Warhammer 40,000, the ‘Aquila’ Double-headed Eagle logo, Warhammer Age of Sigmar, Battletome, Stormcast Eternals, and all associated logos, illustrations, images, names, creatures, races, vehicles, locations, weapons, characters, and the distinctive likenesses thereof, are either ® or ™, and/or © Games Workshop Limited, variably registered around the world. All Rights Reserved.
© Warner Bros. Entertainment Inc. All rights reserved. THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY, THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG, THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES and the names of the characters, items, events and places therein are trademarks of The Saul Zaentz Company d/b/a Middle-earth Enterprises under license to New Line Productions, Inc.         (s15)
© 2016 New Line Productions, Inc. All rights reserved. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King and the names of the characters, items, events and places therein are trademarks of The Saul Zaentz Company d/b/a Middle-earth Enterprises under license to New Line Productions, Inc.

Warhammer Ancient Battles for sale on e-bay

Posted on April 21st, 2016 under , . Posted by

Two more-bay auctions this time Warhammer Ancient Battles. See this auction.And Warhammer Armies of Antiquity supplement . See this auction.Both books are in near perfect condition, never having been used and stored in a box file for years.Go…

Forge World Newsletter

Posted on April 20th, 2016 under , , , , , , . Posted by

For those of you who attend such events…

Warhammer 40,000 The Horus Heresy
Warhammer Fest
Warhammer Fest
© Copyright Games Workshop Limited 2016. GW, Games Workshop, Citadel, Forge World, Warhammer, Warhammer Forge, Warhammer 40,000, the ‘Aquila’ Double-headed eagle logo, Space Marine, 40K, 40,000, Imperial Armour, Warhammer Age of Sigmar, Stormcast Eternals, The Horus Heresy, The Horus Heresy Eye and all associated logos, illustrations, images, names, creatures, races, vehicles, locations, weapons, characters, and the distinctive likenesses thereof, are either ® or TM, and/or © Games Workshop Limited, variably registered around the world. All Rights Reserved.

Koniec… na czas jakiś | The end… for a time being

Posted on April 20th, 2016 under , , , , , . Posted by

Niniejszym wpisem na czas jakiś żegnam Umarłych z Dunharrow. Mormeg z pewnością przygotuje jeszcze co najmniej kilku pieszych, parunastu konnych i jakieś zjawy, niemniej jednak zanim zawitają na blog upłynie nieco czasu. Oczywiście, w najbliższym czasie postaram się również zamieścić parę zdjęć pokazujących wiarołomców w większej grupie… A tymczasem zapraszam do obejrzenia ostatniej czwórki.
This is official “good-bye” note for Dead Men of Dunharrow… for a time being. Mormeg most certainly will paint few more footmen, about a ten horsemen and some other miniatures for this army, wights most likely. But… It will take some time before they will be shown here.


Of course, I intend to show some group shots of Oathbreakers painted so far… But today – enjoy last four of them.


Imperial Knight – in manufactorum pt 11

Posted on April 20th, 2016 under , , . Posted by

Having completed the Tactical Marines I’m struggling to be motivated, that translates to two nights without painting and STILL staying up post midnight – what’s THAT about! Luckily the muse evetually finds me and although the Knight should be way down …