Posts Tagged ‘German’

The Price of Glory

Posted on August 1st, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Still gaming the Great War, but this time back to Europe and with a different rules set ‘The Price of Glory’ (or rather a Dave M variant of), which we have played in the past and is at a much larger scale to the previous weeks activity.

The Western Theatre

 It’s Early War and the initial French push into Germany has come to a halt as the Germans outflank them via Belgium. The Germans are now launching the counter-attack to grab back their territories


The Bridge

The initial French assault in 1914 tends to be forgotten a bit, but was an integral part of the Schlieffen Plan. If the German commanders had held their nerve and just pinned the French the war might actually have been ‘over by Christmas’ as the notorious saying went .

The target for this assault is to capture a village at a river crossing, but with a bonus condition of getting troops off the board. The bridge is the only point at which the river can be crossed and the French start with troops on both sides of the river.

The German Advance

The Germans have managed to send a force round the flank and over the river (which otherwise can only be crossed at the bridge), these would appear after a random number of turns. Fortunately they turned up earlier than expected.

The Flank Attack

Things looked bad for the Germans as the initial advance took heavy casualties from the village and the artillery. Extra reinforcements gave them new impetus and they managed to storm the village and force the defenders back over the bridge.

Storming the Village

The two armies trade fire across the river as the Germans attempt to force their way unsuccessfully over the bridge. On the Flank the Germans are making slow progress along the rail embankment pinned down by the artillery and French reinforcements shifted over onto the embankment.

Firefight across the River

So the Germans get the win by kicking the French out of the village but not the decisive victory as they did not manage to get off the table via the heavily defended roads.

Eine kleine Maus

Posted on July 19th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

The Maus was a German World War Two super heavy tank that was completed in late 1944. Five were ordered, but only two hulls and one turret were completed before the testing grounds were captured by advancing Soviet forces. It is the heaviest fully enclosed armoured fighting vehicle ever built at 188 metric tons. It … Continue reading “Eine kleine Maus”

Stuck Truck Ruck

Posted on July 18th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Two more games of TMWWBK’s, once again set in East Africa during the Great War, with the first scenario being very lopsided and over quickly, and the second lasting a bit longer and a very close finish.

The first game was already under way when I got to the Hall, A truck is stuck in the middle of the table and the two unit of British defenders have to wait for reinforcements to help them out as the enemy approaches.

Slowness of the reinforcements to move up (they entered on a random roll at start of a British turn.) and bad orientation of the MG defending the truck led to this being one sided. Massed fire power saw the truck defenders routed before they could be supported and the now out-numbered reinforcements stood no change of a successful counter-attack.

In the second scenario it’s the get off the table scenario again, as played in the first trial game. The scenario rules meant that the British could just sit there and blast away and not even attempt to get off the table as there’s no real risk of time running out – the slow MG movement, with the movement rate governing the length of game, granting them enough turns to do so.

The Germans launched their native contingent in a mad dash across the battle field, trying to make as much use of cover as possible. The British meanwhile move across to cover their baseline to prevent any enemy units getting off. This would have worked well but for some bad dice rolling from the British and good morale checks from the natives. This lead to two native units getting off the table edge. The third native unit wasn’t so lucky.

The German regulars decide to hang back. having no realistic way of getting off after getting badly shot up and losing a couple of leaders (for the first time in any of the games played). The game ends in a close German win 5-4 in points, with no British units off but a large portion of the German force destroyed.

The system does not seem to like equal forces meeting with the defenders having a large advantage in normal conditions. Maybe more terrain would have helped but you’ve still got the problem of the first to shoot having a big advantage, and when you have equal size forces it’s difficult to gain local superiority in numbers.

Next week is a prospective big battle with two 24pt forces on each side.

Stuck Truck Ruck

Posted on July 18th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Two more games of TMWWBK’s, once again set in East Africa during the Great War, with the first scenario being very lopsided and over quickly, and the second lasting a bit longer and a very close finish.

The first game was already under way when I got to the Hall, A truck is stuck in the middle of the table and the two unit of British defenders have to wait for reinforcements to help them out as the enemy approaches.

Slowness of the reinforcements to move up (they entered on a random roll at start of a British turn.) and bad orientation of the MG defending the truck led to this being one sided. Massed fire power saw the truck defenders routed before they could be supported and the now out-numbered reinforcements stood no change of a successful counter-attack.

In the second scenario it’s the get off the table scenario again, as played in the first trial game. The scenario rules meant that the British could just sit there and blast away and not even attempt to get off the table as there’s no real risk of time running out – the slow MG movement, with the movement rate governing the length of game, granting them enough turns to do so.

The Germans launched their native contingent in a mad dash across the battle field, trying to make as much use of cover as possible. The British meanwhile move across to cover their baseline to prevent any enemy units getting off. This would have worked well but for some bad dice rolling from the British and good morale checks from the natives. This lead to two native units getting off the table edge. The third native unit wasn’t so lucky.

The German regulars decide to hang back. having no realistic way of getting off after getting badly shot up and losing a couple of leaders (for the first time in any of the games played). The game ends in a close German win 5-4 in points, with no British units off but a large portion of the German force destroyed.

The system does not seem to like equal forces meeting with the defenders having a large advantage in normal conditions. Maybe more terrain would have helped but you’ve still got the problem of the first to shoot having a big advantage, and when you have equal size forces it’s difficult to gain local superiority in numbers.

Next week is a prospective big battle with two 24pt forces on each side.

Stuck in the Middle

Posted on July 5th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Back to East Africa and another trial game of TMWWBK in the Great War. Set up by Dave M to test the artillery rules and to get a few more players involved.

A German led force is stuck between two British led groups ( Askari and Indian based respectively ). Naturally enough things didn’t quite go as planned.


The British-Askari force, lead by Matt, moved up the games sole artillery piece. The crew of which is then decimated by a single volley of German rifle fire. Another round of fire saw the gun completely crewless.

The British-Indian force uses successive rounds of fire to dislodge the German MG from it’s position, and to cover the approach of a unit into charge range of a damaged and pinned German unit.

In scenes reminiscent of the previous game the first close assault went against the attacker despite overwhelming advantages. The British change tact and just sends repeated shots into the now surrounded unit till it breaks.

So the link up occurs and the remaining German units are under attack from three sides. They manage to break a couple of the attacking squads as they close but there is just too many to repulse.

The Germans could have done with a couple of prepared positions rather than having to rely on just the rough terrain. And we never found out about the artillery, but from the book it seems the weapon is great just like Machine Guns.

Stuck in the Middle

Posted on July 5th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Back to East Africa and another trial game of TMWWBK in the Great War. Set up by Dave M to test the artillery rules and to get a few more players involved.

A German led force is stuck between two British led groups ( Askari and Indian based respectively ). Naturally enough things didn’t quite go as planned.


The British-Askari force, lead by Matt, moved up the games sole artillery piece. The crew of which is then decimated by a single volley of German rifle fire. Another round of fire saw the gun completely crewless.

The British-Indian force uses successive rounds of fire to dislodge the German MG from it’s position, and to cover the approach of a unit into charge range of a damaged and pinned German unit.

In scenes reminiscent of the previous game the first close assault went against the attacker despite overwhelming advantages. The British change tact and just sends repeated shots into the now surrounded unit till it breaks.

So the link up occurs and the remaining German units are under attack from three sides. They manage to break a couple of the attacking squads as they close but there is just too many to repulse.

The Germans could have done with a couple of prepared positions rather than having to rely on just the rough terrain. And we never found out about the artillery, but from the book it seems the weapon is great just like Machine Guns.

Steampunk Soldiers: Uniforms & Weapons from the Age of Steam (Dark Osprey)

Posted on June 28th, 2017 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

Steampunk Soldiers is a unique pictorial guide to the last great era of bright and colorful uniforms, as well as an important historical study of the variety of steam-powered weaponry and equipment that abounded in the days before the Great War of the …

Steampunk Soldiers: Uniforms & Weapons from the Age of Steam (Dark Osprey)

Posted on June 28th, 2017 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

Steampunk Soldiers is a unique pictorial guide to the last great era of bright and colorful uniforms, as well as an important historical study of the variety of steam-powered weaponry and equipment that abounded in the days before the Great War of the …

Steampunk Soldiers: Uniforms & Weapons from the Age of Steam (Dark Osprey)

Posted on June 28th, 2017 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

Steampunk Soldiers is a unique pictorial guide to the last great era of bright and colorful uniforms, as well as an important historical study of the variety of steam-powered weaponry and equipment that abounded in the days before the Great War of the …

Steampunk Soldiers: Uniforms & Weapons from the Age of Steam (Dark Osprey)

Posted on June 28th, 2017 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

Steampunk Soldiers is a unique pictorial guide to the last great era of bright and colorful uniforms, as well as an important historical study of the variety of steam-powered weaponry and equipment that abounded in the days before the Great War of the …

Would be African Kings

Posted on June 27th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

A game of The Men Who Would Be Kings, but transplanted from it’s usual colonial period forward to East Africa during the Great War, an often forgotten about theatre of that war. Dave M supplied the rules and figures.

A scenario straight out of the book with two balanced forces, of British and German led troops, trying to make their way across the table and ‘Just Passing By’.


I didn’t play but watched the action from the side and tried to assist with the rules. I do own an ebook copy of the rules and was interested to see how things flowed and how the differences from it’s ‘Rampant’ rules siblings panned out.

Things didn’t start to well for the Germans, First coming under heavy rifle fire and then losing the first unit, the games sole cavalry force, after it charged an infantry unit and lost against the odds, ending up pinned in front of a number of rifle units.

The momentum changed to the Germans when fire from a native unit of Ruga Rugas caused the opposing Askari unit to rout straight off the table in it’s rally phase.

The British MG never really got a chance to show what it could do as it was too busy moving from position to position, blocked from firing by it’s own friendly units, and only once getting a partial field of fire.

In the mean time the German forces had found cover and were sending a constant stream of fire into the enemy, keeping them pinned down. IT does seem that once this cycle of constant pins is reached then it’s hard to break.

For this level of skirmish it seemed to work well and flowed quickly with few difficult calculations to make. The difference in pinning and morale rules from the Rampants did take some getting use to. It seems to be a capable set of World War One rules in it’s own right.

Apparently the next test game will include artillery, and possibly Armoured Cars if he can make the rules up for them.

Would be African Kings

Posted on June 27th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

A game of The Men Who Would Be Kings, but transplanted from it’s usual colonial period forward to East Africa during the Great War, an often forgotten about theatre of that war. Dave M supplied the rules and figures.

A scenario straight out of the book with two balanced forces, of British and German led troops, trying to make their way across the table and ‘Just Passing By’.


I didn’t play but watched the action from the side and tried to assist with the rules. I do own an ebook copy of the rules and was interested to see how things flowed and how the differences from it’s ‘Rampant’ rules siblings panned out.

Things didn’t start to well for the Germans, First coming under heavy rifle fire and then losing the first unit, the games sole cavalry force, after it charged an infantry unit and lost against the odds, ending up pinned in front of a number of rifle units.

The momentum changed to the Germans when fire from a native unit of Ruga Rugas caused the opposing Askari unit to rout straight off the table in it’s rally phase.

The British MG never really got a chance to show what it could do as it was too busy moving from position to position, blocked from firing by it’s own friendly units, and only once getting a partial field of fire.

In the mean time the German forces had found cover and were sending a constant stream of fire into the enemy, keeping them pinned down. IT does seem that once this cycle of constant pins is reached then it’s hard to break.

For this level of skirmish it seemed to work well and flowed quickly with few difficult calculations to make. The difference in pinning and morale rules from the Rampants did take some getting use to. It seems to be a capable set of World War One rules in it’s own right.

Apparently the next test game will include artillery, and possibly Armoured Cars if he can make the rules up for them.

Tanker’s Tuesday : German WWI Tanks and Armored Cars

Posted on May 30th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

A long and difficult start

While the British and the French were prompt to built their first operational tanks, the German high command was doubtful at best of their capabilities. That was until mid-1917 when came the successes that proved any well-coordinated attack using tanks in a proper way could break through and create havoc in rear lines. They had some reasons not to urge tank production. First, infantry, like the stürmptruppen (elite assault squads) were a simple and much cheaper way to achieve this breakthrough, as they had shown on many occasions throughout 1917 and particularly during the 1918 spring offensives. The military blockade also played a role, limiting the abilities of an already exhausted industry to produce enough materials and manpower to build swarms of tanks, reducing the chances to launch tank offensives at full force. There was also repugnance for this new “dishonorable weapon” as stated in propaganda and newspapers, coming from the ancient and very deep traditional ways of the Aristocratic Prussian officer, that dominated both the head of staff and the Kaiser himself.

WWI German Tanks And Armored Cars

Tanker’s Tuesday : German WWI Tanks and Armored Cars

Posted on May 30th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

A long and difficult start

While the British and the French were prompt to built their first operational tanks, the German high command was doubtful at best of their capabilities. That was until mid-1917 when came the successes that proved any well-coordinated attack using tanks in a proper way could break through and create havoc in rear lines. They had some reasons not to urge tank production. First, infantry, like the stürmptruppen (elite assault squads) were a simple and much cheaper way to achieve this breakthrough, as they had shown on many occasions throughout 1917 and particularly during the 1918 spring offensives. The military blockade also played a role, limiting the abilities of an already exhausted industry to produce enough materials and manpower to build swarms of tanks, reducing the chances to launch tank offensives at full force. There was also repugnance for this new “dishonorable weapon” as stated in propaganda and newspapers, coming from the ancient and very deep traditional ways of the Aristocratic Prussian officer, that dominated both the head of staff and the Kaiser himself.

WWI German Tanks And Armored Cars