Posts Tagged ‘German’

Steampunk Soldiers: Uniforms & Weapons from the Age of Steam (Dark Osprey)

Posted on June 28th, 2017 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

Steampunk Soldiers is a unique pictorial guide to the last great era of bright and colorful uniforms, as well as an important historical study of the variety of steam-powered weaponry and equipment that abounded in the days before the Great War of the …

Steampunk Soldiers: Uniforms & Weapons from the Age of Steam (Dark Osprey)

Posted on June 28th, 2017 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

Steampunk Soldiers is a unique pictorial guide to the last great era of bright and colorful uniforms, as well as an important historical study of the variety of steam-powered weaponry and equipment that abounded in the days before the Great War of the …

Steampunk Soldiers: Uniforms & Weapons from the Age of Steam (Dark Osprey)

Posted on June 28th, 2017 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

Steampunk Soldiers is a unique pictorial guide to the last great era of bright and colorful uniforms, as well as an important historical study of the variety of steam-powered weaponry and equipment that abounded in the days before the Great War of the …

Would be African Kings

Posted on June 27th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

A game of The Men Who Would Be Kings, but transplanted from it’s usual colonial period forward to East Africa during the Great War, an often forgotten about theatre of that war. Dave M supplied the rules and figures.

A scenario straight out of the book with two balanced forces, of British and German led troops, trying to make their way across the table and ‘Just Passing By’.


I didn’t play but watched the action from the side and tried to assist with the rules. I do own an ebook copy of the rules and was interested to see how things flowed and how the differences from it’s ‘Rampant’ rules siblings panned out.

Things didn’t start to well for the Germans, First coming under heavy rifle fire and then losing the first unit, the games sole cavalry force, after it charged an infantry unit and lost against the odds, ending up pinned in front of a number of rifle units.

The momentum changed to the Germans when fire from a native unit of Ruga Rugas caused the opposing Askari unit to rout straight off the table in it’s rally phase.

The British MG never really got a chance to show what it could do as it was too busy moving from position to position, blocked from firing by it’s own friendly units, and only once getting a partial field of fire.

In the mean time the German forces had found cover and were sending a constant stream of fire into the enemy, keeping them pinned down. IT does seem that once this cycle of constant pins is reached then it’s hard to break.

For this level of skirmish it seemed to work well and flowed quickly with few difficult calculations to make. The difference in pinning and morale rules from the Rampants did take some getting use to. It seems to be a capable set of World War One rules in it’s own right.

Apparently the next test game will include artillery, and possibly Armoured Cars if he can make the rules up for them.

Tanker’s Tuesday : German WWI Tanks and Armored Cars

Posted on May 30th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

A long and difficult start

While the British and the French were prompt to built their first operational tanks, the German high command was doubtful at best of their capabilities. That was until mid-1917 when came the successes that proved any well-coordinated attack using tanks in a proper way could break through and create havoc in rear lines. They had some reasons not to urge tank production. First, infantry, like the stürmptruppen (elite assault squads) were a simple and much cheaper way to achieve this breakthrough, as they had shown on many occasions throughout 1917 and particularly during the 1918 spring offensives. The military blockade also played a role, limiting the abilities of an already exhausted industry to produce enough materials and manpower to build swarms of tanks, reducing the chances to launch tank offensives at full force. There was also repugnance for this new “dishonorable weapon” as stated in propaganda and newspapers, coming from the ancient and very deep traditional ways of the Aristocratic Prussian officer, that dominated both the head of staff and the Kaiser himself.

WWI German Tanks And Armored Cars

Tanker’s Tuesday : German WWI Tanks and Armored Cars

Posted on May 30th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

A long and difficult start

While the British and the French were prompt to built their first operational tanks, the German high command was doubtful at best of their capabilities. That was until mid-1917 when came the successes that proved any well-coordinated attack using tanks in a proper way could break through and create havoc in rear lines. They had some reasons not to urge tank production. First, infantry, like the stürmptruppen (elite assault squads) were a simple and much cheaper way to achieve this breakthrough, as they had shown on many occasions throughout 1917 and particularly during the 1918 spring offensives. The military blockade also played a role, limiting the abilities of an already exhausted industry to produce enough materials and manpower to build swarms of tanks, reducing the chances to launch tank offensives at full force. There was also repugnance for this new “dishonorable weapon” as stated in propaganda and newspapers, coming from the ancient and very deep traditional ways of the Aristocratic Prussian officer, that dominated both the head of staff and the Kaiser himself.

WWI German Tanks And Armored Cars