Posts Tagged ‘Military History’

Tanker’s Tuesday : Heinz Guderian

Posted on July 11th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

Logistics is the ball and chain of armored warfare. …

Heinz Wilhelm Guderian was a German general during World War II, noted for his success as a leader of Panzer units in Poland and France and for partial success in the Soviet Union.

Born: June 17, 1888, Chełmno Poland

Died: May 14, 1954, Schwangau, Germany

Nationality: German

Rank: Colonel general

Tanker’s Tuesday : Heinz Guderian

Posted on July 11th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

Logistics is the ball and chain of armored warfare. …

Heinz Wilhelm Guderian was a German general during World War II, noted for his success as a leader of Panzer units in Poland and France and for partial success in the Soviet Union.

Born: June 17, 1888, Chełmno Poland

Died: May 14, 1954, Schwangau, Germany

Nationality: German

Rank: Colonel general

Tanker’s Tuesday : General Creighton Abrams

Posted on June 13th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

A Stocky, Lantern-Jawed, Cigar-Chomping Cavalryman

The battalion was five miles short of its goal that afternoon when its commander, Lieutenant Colonel Creighton Williams Abrams, Jr., stood on a hill and gazed northward toward Bastogne. Born in Springfield, Massachusetts, the oldest son of a Boston & Albany Railroad repairman, Abrams was a stocky, lantern-jawed, cigar-chomping cavalryman who had graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1936 and become a courageous, resourceful professional soldier respected by all who knew him. He had earned the respect of Patton.
On that December 26, 1944, Abrams was down to 20 tanks, enough for one more assault. Should he take a chance and ask for permission to head straight for Bastogne, regardless of the strength of enemy opposition? Just then, waves of Douglas C-47 transports roared overhead and started parachuting supplies into Bastogne. Abrams’s mind was made up, and he dashed back to his Sherman, nicknamed “Thunderbolt IV,” and radioed Major General Hugh Gaffey, commander of the 4th Armored Division, for permission to move ahead. The word came a few minutes after 3 p.m.

Abrams At The Battle Of The Bulge
General Creighton Abrams

Tanker’s Tuesday : General Creighton Abrams

Posted on June 13th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

A Stocky, Lantern-Jawed, Cigar-Chomping Cavalryman

The battalion was five miles short of its goal that afternoon when its commander, Lieutenant Colonel Creighton Williams Abrams, Jr., stood on a hill and gazed northward toward Bastogne. Born in Springfield, Massachusetts, the oldest son of a Boston & Albany Railroad repairman, Abrams was a stocky, lantern-jawed, cigar-chomping cavalryman who had graduated from the U.S. Military Academy in 1936 and become a courageous, resourceful professional soldier respected by all who knew him. He had earned the respect of Patton.
On that December 26, 1944, Abrams was down to 20 tanks, enough for one more assault. Should he take a chance and ask for permission to head straight for Bastogne, regardless of the strength of enemy opposition? Just then, waves of Douglas C-47 transports roared overhead and started parachuting supplies into Bastogne. Abrams’s mind was made up, and he dashed back to his Sherman, nicknamed “Thunderbolt IV,” and radioed Major General Hugh Gaffey, commander of the 4th Armored Division, for permission to move ahead. The word came a few minutes after 3 p.m.

Abrams At The Battle Of The Bulge
General Creighton Abrams

RajGrunt

Posted on May 30th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

Stuart Murray provided suggestions on combining the StarGrunt rules with Victorian era troops. Laserlight (aka Chris DeBoe) provided about three minutes (his words) of editing plus the name RajGrunt.

Imperial Forces

  • British Army, 1860 to 1895: blue to orange. Home Service units may be green, while Rifles would be orange.
  • Gurkhas: blue to orange
  • Indian sepoys: blue
  • Punjab Frontier Force: orange to red
  • Regular artillery: blue
  • Royal horse Artillery: orange
  • Cavalry: green to blue
  • Lancers: green to blue, with some exceptions–Bengal Lancers are orange.

Enemies of the Crown

  • Pathans: mostly green with occasional blue
  • Afghan Regulars: green and blue
  • Egyptian Army: green, with later units blue
  • Sudanese regulars: blue
  • Zulus: mix of green to veteran depending upon unit type
  • Ansars: green
  • Fuzzy Wuzzies: blue

Weapons

  • Musket: FP 0.5 Impact D6 (regular troops one action to reload, irregulars 2 actions, may not move and fire)
  • Jezail: FP 1 Impact D8 (2 actions to reload, double range like a sniper rifle, may not move and fire)
  • Snider-Enfield/Trapdoor Springfield Carbine: FP 1 Impact D8
  • Martini-Henry/Trapdoor Springfield Rifle/Rollingblock Remington: FP 1 Impact D10
  • Lee-Metford/Krag-Jorgensen/Mauser: FP 1 Impact D10. Can use FP 2 but must use a Reorg action (or, for Krag-Jorgenson, two actions) to reload before using FP2 again.
  • Nordenfeld: FP D6 Impact D8 (Jam on 1-2 on D6)
  • Gatling: FP 6 Impact D10 (Jam on 1 on D6)
  • Maxim: FP D8 Impact D10
  • Cav/Lancers: one/two shifts up in close assault. Lances cause Terror.
  • Bayonets: British regulars openly fixing bayonets before a charge should cause a penalty to the close assault Stand roll for Pathans and Boers.

Organization

Irregulars come in bands of 10-20 figures, with one overall leader. All irregulars will have melée weapons. The proportion with guns will depend upon their nationality:

  • Pathans–up to 50%
  • Zulus–20%
  • Ansars–up to 50%
  • Fuzzies–10 to 50%

Regulars form platoons of 15 to 20 figures led by a leftenant and sergeant, with two to four platoons per Company (“platoon” and “company” correspond to the Battalion page’s “company” and “battalion wing”). The Company is led by a Major and Company Sergeant Major. Ancilliaries may be Bugler/Musician, Medical Orderly and Colours, plus baggage consisting of perhaps five mules per company for ammunition. All Regulars, both British and Indian, are organized similarly. Indian units have Indian NCOs and officers but the Company is commanded by a British officer and CSM. Gurkha units have both British Lieutenants and Company officers but the NCOs are Gurkhas.
Artillery comes at no more than one artillery piece per platoon, or even less, possibly one per company.
Regulars may change formations, using one action to do so. Formations include March (on roads), Open Order, Square, and Line. Units in Line may take two separate fire actions in an activation, firing front and rear ranks.

Other Changes

The Regimental Sergeant Major has leather lungs and retains a six inch communications range. All other leaders change communication range down to 3 inches. Command reactivations for units outside this range must be passed by a messenger–for the British, this is normally a mounted officer.
Detachments must be given specific orders in advance.
Given the ferocity of the natives and their treatment of prisoners, both sides should have a bonus to make Last Stand rolls–especially any French Foreign Legion units.

RajGrunt

Posted on May 30th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

Stuart Murray provided suggestions on combining the StarGrunt rules with Victorian era troops. Laserlight (aka Chris DeBoe) provided about three minutes (his words) of editing plus the name RajGrunt.

Imperial Forces

  • British Army, 1860 to 1895: blue to orange. Home Service units may be green, while Rifles would be orange.
  • Gurkhas: blue to orange
  • Indian sepoys: blue
  • Punjab Frontier Force: orange to red
  • Regular artillery: blue
  • Royal horse Artillery: orange
  • Cavalry: green to blue
  • Lancers: green to blue, with some exceptions–Bengal Lancers are orange.

Enemies of the Crown

  • Pathans: mostly green with occasional blue
  • Afghan Regulars: green and blue
  • Egyptian Army: green, with later units blue
  • Sudanese regulars: blue
  • Zulus: mix of green to veteran depending upon unit type
  • Ansars: green
  • Fuzzy Wuzzies: blue

Weapons

  • Musket: FP 0.5 Impact D6 (regular troops one action to reload, irregulars 2 actions, may not move and fire)
  • Jezail: FP 1 Impact D8 (2 actions to reload, double range like a sniper rifle, may not move and fire)
  • Snider-Enfield/Trapdoor Springfield Carbine: FP 1 Impact D8
  • Martini-Henry/Trapdoor Springfield Rifle/Rollingblock Remington: FP 1 Impact D10
  • Lee-Metford/Krag-Jorgensen/Mauser: FP 1 Impact D10. Can use FP 2 but must use a Reorg action (or, for Krag-Jorgenson, two actions) to reload before using FP2 again.
  • Nordenfeld: FP D6 Impact D8 (Jam on 1-2 on D6)
  • Gatling: FP 6 Impact D10 (Jam on 1 on D6)
  • Maxim: FP D8 Impact D10
  • Cav/Lancers: one/two shifts up in close assault. Lances cause Terror.
  • Bayonets: British regulars openly fixing bayonets before a charge should cause a penalty to the close assault Stand roll for Pathans and Boers.

Organization

Irregulars come in bands of 10-20 figures, with one overall leader. All irregulars will have melée weapons. The proportion with guns will depend upon their nationality:

  • Pathans–up to 50%
  • Zulus–20%
  • Ansars–up to 50%
  • Fuzzies–10 to 50%

Regulars form platoons of 15 to 20 figures led by a leftenant and sergeant, with two to four platoons per Company (“platoon” and “company” correspond to the Battalion page’s “company” and “battalion wing”). The Company is led by a Major and Company Sergeant Major. Ancilliaries may be Bugler/Musician, Medical Orderly and Colours, plus baggage consisting of perhaps five mules per company for ammunition. All Regulars, both British and Indian, are organized similarly. Indian units have Indian NCOs and officers but the Company is commanded by a British officer and CSM. Gurkha units have both British Lieutenants and Company officers but the NCOs are Gurkhas.
Artillery comes at no more than one artillery piece per platoon, or even less, possibly one per company.
Regulars may change formations, using one action to do so. Formations include March (on roads), Open Order, Square, and Line. Units in Line may take two separate fire actions in an activation, firing front and rear ranks.

Other Changes

The Regimental Sergeant Major has leather lungs and retains a six inch communications range. All other leaders change communication range down to 3 inches. Command reactivations for units outside this range must be passed by a messenger–for the British, this is normally a mounted officer.
Detachments must be given specific orders in advance.
Given the ferocity of the natives and their treatment of prisoners, both sides should have a bonus to make Last Stand rolls–especially any French Foreign Legion units.