Posts Tagged ‘paintingwarhammer’

Wizard in Progress: The trouble with cloaks…

Posted on April 20th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

So you can see from the picture the problem. With the big flowing cloak in the back, any detail on the mini-disc of Tzeentch is entirely lost.Will look great running away… Also secret reveal of extra layers of painting!The solution is to just put any…

Thousand Sons: Porthos the Sorcerer and The Disclet of Tzeentch!

Posted on April 17th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Double post to make up for missing yesterday. I was busy driving back from visiting Tabletop Engineer, so couldn’t put up anything.This is a work in progress for Porthos’ “bike”, the Disclet of Tzeentch. Not as big or powerful as a proper Disc, it’s en…

Thousand Sons: Porthos the Sorcerer, a Rescue

Posted on April 17th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

This is another quick post, as it’s Easter Monday. This is a before and after shot for the first of my Thousand Sons sorcerer army, named after one of the Three Musketeers, Porthos!Poor guy…Needs a bit more blue and contrast on it, but it’s certainly…

Army Showcase and Painting Guide: Purple Orks

Posted on April 1st, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

So, my surprise project has been my Grape Ladz, an army of purple painted orks.I’m particularly proud of the Squiggoth As you can see, their camo blends really well with the city scape. I was so pleased with the effect, I thought I’d let you in on…

New Dawn Flotilla: Outcast Shining Spear Prototype

Posted on March 29th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Laptop still dead, but nothing stops the Tabletop Teacher Train*!

Here’s a picture of the prototype for my Outcat Shining Spears.



Shining Spear Outcast Warrior

Rather than have traditional Aspect Warriors, I’m making all my specialist troops different factions from the Eldar race. The New Dawn Flotilla is a motely collection of ships that have broken away from the Lugganath Craftworld, in search of a new path for the Eldar to reclaim their future.

These Shining Spears, along with some Warp Spiders, are part of a trophy hunting corsair group, out to hunt the biggest and strongest creatures out there. Why? Because after a few hundred years of floating through space, you’d be bored too.

I particularly like his flaming spear, but absolutely hate the paint on the skin. It’s a little too pale. Does anyone have any suggestions on making a more tanned tone?

Until next time!

* Reports, Broken Laptops, Anniversaries, Birthdays and Mother’s Day are things that have been known to stop the Tabletop Teacher Train.



Thanks for reading.

If you liked what you saw, and you want to help out, please leave a comment. Sharing this with your friends, and following me on Twitter, Facebook or Google+ would also be hugely appreciated.

If you have anything you want me to look at, let me know in the comments below. I’ll probably be able to write an article about that topic within a day!

If you really love what I do here, you can make a one off donation at my PayPal, or become a true hero to table top education and make a regular donation to my Patreon. Every Little helps!

New Dawn Flotilla: Eldar Farseer

Posted on March 27th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Bleh. I am slipping from my daily schedule. What can I say? Reports, a wedding anniversary and Mother’s Day all collapsed into a singularity of time, meaning none was left for hobbying, let alone blogging. Here’s a picture of my completed Eldar Farseer…

Painting Guide: Perfect Hazard Stripes

Posted on March 21st, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

One of the things I had to work on for the Space Marine Police Force was the hazard stripes on their bolters.

Whilst it may seem like an arbitrary aesthetic choice taken from the Iron Warriors, this is actually a throw back to their Rogue Trader origins. The original SMFP had a stripe down his head. I found that it didn’t translate so well on the more modern power armours, so I left it off the helmet.

To keep it tied in, I needed to think what a military force all about procedure and public good would do… so I put the hazard stripes on all their weapons:

It makes sense to me that these Marines would have these warning signs out on these dangerous tools. I imagine them walking across the battlefield shouting “Stop or I’ll shoot!” before every volley, more interested in taking combatants into custody and due process than bloodshed. This also led to the decision to ring the bikes with hazard stripes as well:

After all, a citizen could hurt themselves on those things as a fully armoured SMFP officer crashes into them at high speed!

Making these is a pain though, as you really notice shoddy brush work. These stripes are meant to be very uniform, and you can’t really justify wonky lines as personal touches of the Marine you’re painting. This is a procedural matter!

So, first step is to base coat the bolter itself. This just needs a base coat of Averland Sunset, that one yellow paint that literally everybody has because it comes in the starter paint set.

I forgot to take a picture of it, but then I give the whole thing a light wash in Seraphim Sepia. You can use any other yellow wash, I just find that Sepia gives you a little bit of a more deeper yellow. It’s a little closer to the traditional dirty yellow of actual hazard stripes.

Now… let’s cheat a bit.

I have terrible brush control, and after the 4th cup of coffee to keep up the edutainment in the classroom, my hands are not the most stable. So I bought a nifty tool from the local stationers:

This is a foam sponge I actually stole from my 2-year olds brush set (he’s just on paper for now… gets his first Stormcast on his 3rd birthday). The whole kit cost about £2, which means the sponge itself was probably about 10p. Contrast that to a Citadel Artificer brush!

This is going to give us a nice straight edge to the hazard stripe. Put some Abaddon Black on you palette and dab the brush onto the point. Then dab this onto the bolter in diagonals.

Dab around the bolter to continue the line, just keeping the sponge at the same angle. This means you’ll have a nice straight line right the way around the bolter.

After that, it’s just a case of tidying up any splatters:

If you want, you can fill in the black lines to a more solid colour. I kind of like the splattered edges, as it gives the stripes a sprayed-on look.

After that, take some Yriel Yellow and do the highlights. I actually recommend against highlighting the black stripes, as this gives them a nice contrast to the yellow. I put some on this model, but regret it a little. I also did my highlight in an unusual way, simply painting down the middle of the yellow line rather than following the bolter edges.

I haven’t got the art training to justify the choice, but it just seems to make the striping stick out more.

After that, do the rest of the gun. All in all the whole process takes five minutes, excluding drying time, but including time taken to wash the brushes.

So… what do you think? Effective? Rubbish? Your way is better? Let me know in the comments!

Thanks for reading.

If you liked what you saw, and you want to help out, please leave a comment. Sharing this with your friends, and following me on Twitter, Facebook or Google+ would also be hugely appreciated.

If you have anything you want me to look at, let me know in the comments below. I’ll probably be able to write an article about that topic within a day!

If you really love what I do here, you can make a one off donation at my PayPal, or become a true hero to table top education and make a regular donation to my Patreon. Every Little helps!

Space Marine Field Police on Patrol

Posted on March 14th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

After a surprise 14 hour day at work (which included school trip, ice skating, a church ceremony and meeting royalty… and I’m not even joking when I list that…), I’m taking the day off blogging.This means you get a cool picture. Enjoy!Space Marine …

Dreadnought Naming Competition!

Posted on March 13th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

This is my latest dreadnought to add to my Space Marine Field Police:The nameless Space Marine Field Police DreadnoughtBlue top lights flashing!Only the judged and sentenced see his back…Unlike Judge Dreadnought, he doesn’t have a name yet. I’d like …

Beginner’s Guide To Free Hand Writing

Posted on March 10th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Judge Dreadnought here to educate you.

It should be a Tabletop Engineer post today, explaining how he made his AdMech Techguard. However, I’m stealing back my blog for the day to do a how to guide on Free Hand Writing.

I saw this picture on the Twitters made by the amazingly helpful Cadian Shock:

He was practicing free hand painting on the underside of one of his tanks. So, in an effort to get noticed by a more long term and bigger blogger (a shameless act of self-promotion), I thought I’d bump this guide up earlier in the schedule.

You might remember the above Judge Dreadnought from previous posts. It has the motto of my home made chapter on it, the nameless and numberless Space Marine Field Police (SMFP)! “Nos es Legis” (“We are the law” in low Gothic) is their first motto, but I may change it out for a more manly sounding “Nos es Lex”.

Pigeon Latin for Imperial fluff is a topic in itself, but as I was making the writing I took a step by step picture, which will do double duty as a project log and how-to guide.

Step 1: Research

What does Imperial Script look like anyway? I dove into some old pictures and settled on mimicking the Dark Angel banner font. “Ex tenebrae lux (From darkness, light)” has been one of my favourite chapter mottos, and I’ll be stealing it for my SMFP later on. “Ex tenebrae lex (From darkness, law)” in case you were wondering.

Step 2: Design

Epic advice on passing high school Physics re-purposed for toy soldiers.
Idle doodling on an old worksheet for how the writing should look. I copied the writing as best I could, but I’m not an artist. As long as the vague shape is similar, the model won’t look out of place along side anything with a proper transfer.

Step 3: Practice

I have some ceramic tiles we use for lab work, which I also use as a palette. The paint sits really well on it, and tends to flow smoothly around it. It makes for a good practice surface, which gives us the following result.

Smooth white tile begs to be marked!

Just as a quick aside, this is the consistency of the paint I use for lettering.

Painty puddles

You can see it’s quite watery, and that’s to ensure ease of writing. People tend to write at a faster speed than they paint, and when you write slower than your natural speed you actually lose a little control. Very fluid paint ensures that you can at least get close to your natural writing speed.

Step 4: Dark colour
It’s obvious from the above photo that we’ve started with a dark greys, rather than jumping straight into white letters. There are two reasons for this. Going through various greys to a final white is just how you put white paint onto a black undercoat.
The second reason is for the very likely event we screw up the lettering on the first pass. Recovering a dark grey takes less paint than a brighter white, which means less detail is lost on the model. For broad flat areas, like those we tend to put lettering on, this ensures we don’t get odd bumps of thick paint appearing on the flat surfaces.
In the below photo you can see the first layer of Eshin Grey done, and a further layer of Dawnstone on top.
Judge Dreadnought judges the painter whilst he works

Having that bit of fuzzy grey around the writing can be cleaned up if you like, but I like the glowing effect it produces.

Step 5: Layering and Highlight
This is a stylistic choice for me. I treat free hand writing as I would any object on the model, and so give it a layer and a highlight. This helps the writing to stand out a bit, rather than leaving it flat looking.
Pick your style though, as we’re going for contrast. As the black panel here is quite flat, a highlighted 3-D looking letter sticks out from the rest of the model. If you had a textured surface, I’d imagine flat letters would stick out more. 
For this part I’ve layered in Ulthuan Grey, and then highlighted with White Scar. You can see the White Scar only goes into the top corners of the letters, creating a nice textured effect.
“We are the law!” – Judge Dreadnought in response to xenos claims of innocence
If all this looks like a lot of effort, it’s not really. The whole process is relatively fast, as the paint dries so quickly. This whole thing took me 15 minutes, and I was taking pictures all the way through.
That said, there’s probably a faster, or more efficient way of doing this. If you have any, let me know in the comments below, or send me some feedback over Twiter or Facebook.
Until next time!
Thanks for reading.

If you liked what you saw, and you want to help out, please leave a comment. Sharing this with your friends, and following me on Twitter, Facebook or Google+ would also be hugely appreciated.

If you have anything you want me to look at, let me know in the comments below. I’ll probably be able to write an article about that topic within a day!

If you really love what I do here, you can make a one off donation at my PayPal, or become a true hero to table top education and make a regular donation to my Patreon. Every Little helps!

Tabletop Engineer: Gunslinger Blood Angel

Posted on February 20th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Another offering from the Tabletop Engineer, here we have a dual melta pistol wielding Blood Angel!His guide to building this model will go up on his new weekly Friday spot.Until next time!Thanks for reading.If you liked what you saw, and you want to h…