Posts Tagged ‘Warfare Miniatures’

Nice work chaps! Warfare Minis Guest Gallery 1

Posted on July 22nd, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Note: when I first got the idea to do this post I thought it might be a one off. In the end I had enough photos (with many left over) to do a series of 5 posts. I really enjoyed looking at what gamers and painters have done with range…..Swedish Kalma…

Some time to reflect

Posted on July 19th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

Plenty of space to let my mind wander here….24.8062° N, 56.1254° E

Being somewhat averse to the sun I have used much of my time this last week to catch up on written projects safely indoors and away from it. I realized that I have a lot of these projects.

This bizarre battlefield duel did take place between two allies at 18.0193° N, 76.9758° W

I spent a good chunk of the week organizing the October gaming weekender and sorting out all of the details and plot twists. The narrative of this campaign is pretty extensive and the fact that our players assume the characters allows the whole thing to take off in a way that makes putting the pieces together into a coherent story much easier.

Compagnies Franche de la Marine will make an appearance in October at 20.0549° N, 72.7925° W

The collateral varies from the objective, statistic based  OOBs, casualty stats, routs and triumphs to the more subjective perspectives of what actually happened. Over the piece, which has so far involved eighteen people, eleven tabletop battles and much behind the scenes activity, many details have had to be created.

Building the story around the Nieuw Geoctroyeerde Westindische Compagnie was fun!

There is a very fine line between fact and fantasy and my extension of the facts is I hope, mostly grounded in logical hypothesis and projections rather than an alternative universe. In creating these additional data it has become clear that much of it could be used by other gamers who wish to explore the possibilities of the period beyond the historical battles which are easy to find on Wikipedia.

English and Dutch forts in Ghana in the 1700s – Komenda Wars

My own need to enhance the detail of the Caribbean theatre operations has lead me to find information on the Komenda Wars in Ghana between the British and the Dutch at a time when the countries were combined under William III! This nugget merits automatic inclusion in the next but one iteration of our expanding world of Jacobite v Williamite!

Jean Baptiste du Casse – will appear in October in Dumfries!

I discovered Jean Baptiste Du Casse – French Governor of Saint Dominique – how could I have missed this guy before? Another immediate inclusion. Add that to colonial struggles in Brazil, Madagascar, Pondicherry and Bangkok and my head is exploding with painting projects and scenarios.

This island features prominently in our October weekend

Team Harrison & Hilton are ideas rich but time poor. We have more output than we can cope with and this inevitably leads to delays in our material surfacing. The balance is creative control versus volume and at the moment we are losing the fight.

Jacobites and Williamites fight over near 54.8274° N, 7.4633° W

We are very conscious of the numerous requests for publication of things that we have mentioned on blogs and fora but currently cannot meet the demand.

We are trying to find compromises to unblock the log jam. Apart from BLB3/WTK we have the regimental level version of the same rules finished. We have texts for 12 new uniform pdfs, we have a Crimean and and ACW version of Republic to Empire finished, there is the Donnybrook Dark material which could pretty much go now, there is the Billy Bunteresque Victory without Quarter and a further regimental set of rules which I penned for the GNW but which now may be superseded by BLB3 Regimental level.

How to get all this stuff out there? Cloning? Hiring? Giving up what we do currently to concentrate on the hobby(attractive but not commercially viable).

In October there is trouble brewing near 56.6826° N, 5.1023° W. I know, I’ve been there!

My own thoughts are to  plough on, keep creating and work towards a system that allows us to get more out there quicker.

I have decided that the collateral from the campaign is meaty enough to be compiled into a wargaming guide for like minded should who want a bit of a dip into the period. I am working on that right now.

I have enjoyed my Busman’s Break at the laptop. It has been fun and creative. More to come….

Amongst other places, we’ll make it here in 2018.. 15.2993° N, 74.1240° E

Some time to reflect

Posted on July 19th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

Plenty of space to let my mind wander here….24.8062° N, 56.1254° E

Being somewhat averse to the sun I have used much of my time this last week to catch up on written projects safely indoors and away from it. I realized that I have a lot of these projects.

This bizarre battlefield duel did take place between two allies at 18.0193° N, 76.9758° W

I spent a good chunk of the week organizing the October gaming weekender and sorting out all of the details and plot twists. The narrative of this campaign is pretty extensive and the fact that our players assume the characters allows the whole thing to take off in a way that makes putting the pieces together into a coherent story much easier.

Compagnies Franche de la Marine will make an appearance in October at 20.0549° N, 72.7925° W

The collateral varies from the objective, statistic based  OOBs, casualty stats, routs and triumphs to the more subjective perspectives of what actually happened. Over the piece, which has so far involved eighteen people, eleven tabletop battles and much behind the scenes activity, many details have had to be created.

Building the story around the Nieuw Geoctroyeerde Westindische Compagnie was fun!

There is a very fine line between fact and fantasy and my extension of the facts is I hope, mostly grounded in logical hypothesis and projections rather than an alternative universe. In creating these additional data it has become clear that much of it could be used by other gamers who wish to explore the possibilities of the period beyond the historical battles which are easy to find on Wikipedia.

English and Dutch forts in Ghana in the 1700s – Komenda Wars

My own need to enhance the detail of the Caribbean theatre operations has lead me to find information on the Komenda Wars in Ghana between the British and the Dutch at a time when the countries were combined under William III! This nugget merits automatic inclusion in the next but one iteration of our expanding world of Jacobite v Williamite!

Jean Baptiste du Casse – will appear in October in Dumfries!

I discovered Jean Baptiste Du Casse – French Governor of Saint Dominique – how could I have missed this guy before? Another immediate inclusion. Add that to colonial struggles in Brazil, Madagascar, Pondicherry and Bangkok and my head is exploding with painting projects and scenarios.

This island features prominently in our October weekend

Team Harrison & Hilton are ideas rich but time poor. We have more output than we can cope with and this inevitably leads to delays in our material surfacing. The balance is creative control versus volume and at the moment we are losing the fight.

Jacobites and Williamites fight over near 54.8274° N, 7.4633° W

We are very conscious of the numerous requests for publication of things that we have mentioned on blogs and fora but currently cannot meet the demand.

We are trying to find compromises to unblock the log jam. Apart from BLB3/WTK we have the regimental level version of the same rules finished. We have texts for 12 new uniform pdfs, we have a Crimean and and ACW version of Republic to Empire finished, there is the Donnybrook Dark material which could pretty much go now, there is the Billy Bunteresque Victory without Quarter and a further regimental set of rules which I penned for the GNW but which now may be superseded by BLB3 Regimental level.

How to get all this stuff out there? Cloning? Hiring? Giving up what we do currently to concentrate on the hobby(attractive but not commercially viable).

In October there is trouble brewing near 56.6826° N, 5.1023° W. I know, I’ve been there!

My own thoughts are to  plough on, keep creating and work towards a system that allows us to get more out there quicker.

I have decided that the collateral from the campaign is meaty enough to be compiled into a wargaming guide for like minded should who want a bit of a dip into the period. I am working on that right now.

I have enjoyed my Busman’s Break at the laptop. It has been fun and creative. More to come….

Amongst other places, we’ll make it here in 2018.. 15.2993° N, 74.1240° E

Battle for Britain – inside the Caribbean forces

Posted on July 14th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Creole infantry in action!

The Caribbean theatre started as a one off idea but the more I researched it the more I got hooked by the scope, scale and generally bizarre nature of what the European superpowers got up to there.

Our first outing centres on Jamaica – previously Spanish, now English and very recently declared for King James and not King William.  Challenging possession of the island is an unholy alliance between the displaced Spaniards, now operating from the much larger territory of Cuba and their Protestant allies – the Huguenots and a distinctly commercial concern the NGWIC (new Dutch West India Company)

This post is about the forces and not the action so here they are with a little explanation of each on the way:

General Dominic Sheldon’s Irish Expeditionary Regiment of Foot

Sheldon’s Irish Regiment is a composite force of ten companies drawn from the regiments in England and Ireland. There are three pike companies (how useful this weapon would be in the Indies remains to be seen), five musketeer companies, one oversized grenadier company and an independent fuzileer company. Two light guns accompanied the force. The commander is Englishman, devout Catholic and loyal servant of King James – Dominic Sheldon. Total compliment 650 men.

General Torres Spanish Force from Cuba

The Spaniards want Jamaica back. King Carlos has agreed to support the Williamite invasion in order to win a chance of regaining the island )although how this is to be achieved is not certain). The Spanish force is composed of experienced Tropical service soldiers from the Cartagena Tercio.  Six musketeer companies and one pike company are drawn from this regular formation. In addition, Torres has brought a body of 60 cuirassiers under Don Ramon and a further 60 volunteer Horse. Since Jamaica was Spanish until relatively recently many Spanish born men on the island have rallied to a secret call to arms producing two large units of Spanish- Jamaican militia amounting to over 200 men. The Spaniards also have two large field cannons. The total Spanish force exceeds 740 men.

NGWIC Forces – Dutch West India Company troops out of Sint Maarten.

I looked into the Dutch West India Company a little. I did not find definitive military organizational information but I assumed a military presence and put together seven companies of musketeers, one of Grenadiers, two volunteer companies of Protestant Irish Planters who will not swear fealty to King James and two light guns. In command of the force is the Scottish aristocrat Lord George Hamilton, recently commander of Enniskillen forces in England. The destruction of his command at Ripon was rewarded with a large shareholding in the Dutch India Company and an immediate posting to supervise military operations in the Caribbean where King William wished to open a new front. Clarence kindly created the flags which are the genuine design. I had high hopes for these Dutchmen.

Governor Kirke’s Lambs – used to the heat after Tangier

General Piercy Kirke, controversial, blunt, combative, corrupt, brutal, coarse (and these are only some of the complementary adjectives used to describe him!) has escaped two murder attempts to be promoted to Governor of Jamaica. He has been able to take with him most of his veteran regiment, The Lambs. His force contains four companies of musketeers one of grenadiers and two of pikemen. These are supported by two volunteer companies of Irish Catholic Planters from Jamaica, one troop of volunteer gentlemen planter cavalry and a very large field piece called ‘Long Sal’.

Colonel Hylton’s Creole Regiment and Jamaican volunteers

The English had Creole regiments in the Caribbean. One such is led by Bartholomew Hylton. The regiment has six companies of matchlock armed musketeers. In addition, Jamaica has raised the militias of Port Royal and Spanish Town together with citizen volunteers from both settlements. The army had sent selected grenadiers to form a composite company of English elite troops. Further support came from three troops of volunteer Horse drawn from plantation owners and workers. Local fortifications had several naval guns available. There were nearly 800 men in the Jamaican force.

Le Marquis de Ruvigny’s Huguenot and Native force

The French Huguenot Marquis de Ruvigny has been sent to the Caribees by King William but the motivation is not totally clear. a core of Huguenot regulars is the heart of the force but there are several unusual elements including Huguenot planters from Martinique and Gualdeloupe, Haitian Freemen who belong to some sort of cult known as Kil nan lanmò (Haitian Creole), several groups of Maroons( freed or escape English slaves) known as the Warria and Smuggla and small bands of Tainu natives from Jamaica and surrounding islands. This force created some of the most interesting, weird and comic incidents of the invasion. 



Battle for Britain – inside the Caribbean forces

Posted on July 14th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Creole infantry in action!

The Caribbean theatre started as a one off idea but the more I researched it the more I got hooked by the scope, scale and generally bizarre nature of what the European superpowers got up to there.

Our first outing centres on Jamaica – previously Spanish, now English and very recently declared for King James and not King William.  Challenging possession of the island is an unholy alliance between the displaced Spaniards, now operating from the much larger territory of Cuba and their Protestant allies – the Huguenots and a distinctly commercial concern the NGWIC (new Dutch West India Company)

This post is about the forces and not the action so here they are with a little explanation of each on the way:

General Dominic Sheldon’s Irish Expeditionary Regiment of Foot

Sheldon’s Irish Regiment is a composite force of ten companies drawn from the regiments in England and Ireland. There are three pike companies (how useful this weapon would be in the Indies remains to be seen), five musketeer companies, one oversized grenadier company and an independent fuzileer company. Two light guns accompanied the force. The commander is Englishman, devout Catholic and loyal servant of King James – Dominic Sheldon. Total compliment 650 men.

General Torres Spanish Force from Cuba

The Spaniards want Jamaica back. King Carlos has agreed to support the Williamite invasion in order to win a chance of regaining the island )although how this is to be achieved is not certain). The Spanish force is composed of experienced Tropical service soldiers from the Cartagena Tercio.  Six musketeer companies and one pike company are drawn from this regular formation. In addition, Torres has brought a body of 60 cuirassiers under Don Ramon and a further 60 volunteer Horse. Since Jamaica was Spanish until relatively recently many Spanish born men on the island have rallied to a secret call to arms producing two large units of Spanish- Jamaican militia amounting to over 200 men. The Spaniards also have two large field cannons. The total Spanish force exceeds 740 men.

NGWIC Forces – Dutch West India Company troops out of Sint Maarten.

I looked into the Dutch West India Company a little. I did not find definitive military organizational information but I assumed a military presence and put together seven companies of musketeers, one of Grenadiers, two volunteer companies of Protestant Irish Planters who will not swear fealty to King James and two light guns. In command of the force is the Scottish aristocrat Lord George Hamilton, recently commander of Enniskillen forces in England. The destruction of his command at Ripon was rewarded with a large shareholding in the Dutch India Company and an immediate posting to supervise military operations in the Caribbean where King William wished to open a new front. Clarence kindly created the flags which are the genuine design. I had high hopes for these Dutchmen.

Governor Kirke’s Lambs – used to the heat after Tangier

General Piercy Kirke, controversial, blunt, combative, corrupt, brutal, coarse (and these are only some of the complementary adjectives used to describe him!) has escaped two murder attempts to be promoted to Governor of Jamaica. He has been able to take with him most of his veteran regiment, The Lambs. His force contains four companies of musketeers one of grenadiers and two of pikemen. These are supported by two volunteer companies of Irish Catholic Planters from Jamaica, one troop of volunteer gentlemen planter cavalry and a very large field piece called ‘Long Sal’.

Colonel Hylton’s Creole Regiment and Jamaican volunteers

The English had Creole regiments in the Caribbean. One such is led by Bartholomew Hylton. The regiment has six companies of matchlock armed musketeers. In addition, Jamaica has raised the militias of Port Royal and Spanish Town together with citizen volunteers from both settlements. The army had sent selected grenadiers to form a composite company of English elite troops. Further support came from three troops of volunteer Horse drawn from plantation owners and workers. Local fortifications had several naval guns available. There were nearly 800 men in the Jamaican force.

Le Marquis de Ruvigny’s Huguenot and Native force

The French Huguenot Marquis de Ruvigny has been sent to the Caribees by King William but the motivation is not totally clear. a core of Huguenot regulars is the heart of the force but there are several unusual elements including Huguenot planters from Martinique and Gualdeloupe, Haitian Freemen who belong to some sort of cult known as Kil nan lanmò (Haitian Creole), several groups of Maroons( freed or escape English slaves) known as the Warria and Smuggla and small bands of Tainu natives from Jamaica and surrounding islands. This force created some of the most interesting, weird and comic incidents of the invasion. 



The Battle for Britain 1693 The fighting begins…

Posted on July 9th, 2017 under , , , , , , . Posted by

Kirke’s arrival at Santa Marta  – The Creole Regiment was already in position

Of course I have already blogged briefly on the topic of our 1693 Battle for Britain adventures but not really given any detailed insight into the battles. The reason was simple. I had a mass of data to sift through and organize and my time between the beginning of April (when we did it) and now has been filled with tiresome travel, work, Warfare Miniatures technical stuff and getting WTK to a stage where Clarence could do something with it.

The forward position – English officers marshal their Creole soldiers

Now that I am sitting in 45+ centigrade (well not sitting in it actually.. sitting as far indoors as possible away from it), I have had time to write the narrative and process the stats. The weekend was missing several important characters – Berwick in Rome, Tollemache in the trenches somewhere in Flanders, Marlborough at King Louis pleasure in Versailles, Sarsfield back in Ireland, Wauchope mad in a monastery.

The Santa Marta table before the arrival of both forces. Looking from the south west

Notwithstanding the absence of these glitterati, there were plenty of characters left to create the necessary mayhem. There were five battles in total; A dour Scots affair which saw Dundee breaking up a conventicle in Lanarkshire, an encounter battle between Lord Galmoy’s Flying Column and General Mackay’s Northern Williamites, a raid on Jamaica by Dutch and Huguenots, a large battle between the Jacobite Irish and Mackay in Yorkshire and finally a full blown battle to throw the English out of Jamaica.

The Dutch NGWIC troops approach through the jungle – Clarence made the flags especially

Obviously we have lots to share on based on the outputs from this weekend but lets start with something completely different.

Here are some extracts from the narrative which explain why Piercy Kirke found himself Governor of Jamaica and having to defend a Spanish slaving post in the centre of the island with English-Creoles against invading Huguenot and Dutch West India Company troops.

The Dutch had to cross the crocodile infested river which really slowed them down
Piercy Kirke, having survived two proximate attempts on his life had been packed off as Governor of Jamaica by King James just after the turn of the year. Kirke, a dexterous and combative man despite his years had drowned one assailant in a quart of boiling coffee whilst braining two others with a hot skillet during what was to become known as the Oxford Coffee Break.

I will do a feature on the organization of my Creole companies – 1:5 model to man ratio this represents 60 men

Moving on to supposedly quieter circumstances the General found himself tied to a bed which was promptly set ablaze during the Frolic at Faggots. The two wenches accused of this dalliance gone wrong waited tables at the Faggot’s Inn, Finchley but were never traced. Kirke insisted that whilst availing himself of some well-earned rest he dosed off only to be awakened by smoke. 

The Huguenots companies press into Santa Marta with Dutch racing away on the left

Finding himself lashed to the bed he used his battlefield voice to raise the alarm and was freed by a stable boy. The general was sorely blistered and remained in danger of his life for two weeks having suffered excruciatingly in the nether regions of his body. Kirke’s dispatch to the Tropics prompted the King to be persuaded by advisers such as Sarsfield and Hamilton to have the rascal kept eye upon. 

Kirke rode inland accompanied only by his servant and Sheldon to take command of a few companies of Creole infantry from the garrison regiment of Colonel Hylton bolstered by some 40 English grenadiers lately arrived from Port Royal. This officer lay sick with ague and his native troops were scattered in outposts across the island. Kirke’s arrival was indeed timely. 
The Dutch captured the redoubt in the foreground but then came under flanking fire
Within two hours of taking command at Santa Marta advanced parties of both de Ruvigny’s and Hamilton’s forces began emerging from the jungle. The latter were somewhat hampered by having to cross a deep stream inhabited by numerous and aggressive crocodiles. At least five men are known to have been taken by the beasts as recorded in the journal of Captain Collaert of the NGWIC.

The Dutch made modest progress over running an outpost but presented no real threat to the position. De Ruvigny’s motley command however succeeded in penetrating Santa Marta and setting some of the huts on fire. A group of diminutive natives stormed the front-line barricades and the situation appeared parlous until a troop of mounted plantation workers charged into the fray and disrupted the Huguenot attack.
Kirke directs the defence against a rabid tribe of diminutive natives and Huguenot Privateers
One company under Captain Samuel Tyler had every one of its 54 men killed or wounded. The English composed themselves and the attackers withdrew back into the bush to lick their wounds. Kirke reported 120 men killed wounded or missing during the action. He grudgingly praised the intervention of Squire Tregarren and his workers likening their charge to that of ‘Berber blackbeards giving chase to Tangier’s English whores’.
Creoles defend English colonial possessions loyally and bravely.
Losses amongst the Williamite forces are difficult to determine as the French did not record native casualties. Estimates place combined Dutch and French losses near 200. Despite his success Kirke abandoned Santa Marta at dusk and fell back on Spanish Town. 
The journey to the Caribbean opened so many doors for us and we had great fun with the whole native tribes dimension. This was a company level action using BLB3 WTK and worked very well.

The Battle for Britain 1693 The fighting begins…

Posted on July 9th, 2017 under , , , , , , . Posted by

Kirke’s arrival at Santa Marta  – The Creole Regiment was already in position

Of course I have already blogged briefly on the topic of our 1693 Battle for Britain adventures but not really given any detailed insight into the battles. The reason was simple. I had a mass of data to sift through and organize and my time between the beginning of April (when we did it) and now has been filled with tiresome travel, work, Warfare Miniatures technical stuff and getting WTK to a stage where Clarence could do something with it.

The forward position – English officers marshal their Creole soldiers

Now that I am sitting in 45+ centigrade (well not sitting in it actually.. sitting as far indoors as possible away from it), I have had time to write the narrative and process the stats. The weekend was missing several important characters – Berwick in Rome, Tollemache in the trenches somewhere in Flanders, Marlborough at King Louis pleasure in Versailles, Sarsfield back in Ireland, Wauchope mad in a monastery.

The Santa Marta table before the arrival of both forces. Looking from the south west

Notwithstanding the absence of these glitterati, there were plenty of characters left to create the necessary mayhem. There were five battles in total; A dour Scots affair which saw Dundee breaking up a conventicle in Lanarkshire, an encounter battle between Lord Galmoy’s Flying Column and General Mackay’s Northern Williamites, a raid on Jamaica by Dutch and Huguenots, a large battle between the Jacobite Irish and Mackay in Yorkshire and finally a full blown battle to throw the English out of Jamaica.

The Dutch NGWIC troops approach through the jungle – Clarence made the flags especially

Obviously we have lots to share on based on the outputs from this weekend but lets start with something completely different.

Here are some extracts from the narrative which explain why Piercy Kirke found himself Governor of Jamaica and having to defend a Spanish slaving post in the centre of the island with English-Creoles against invading Huguenot and Dutch West India Company troops.

The Dutch had to cross the crocodile infested river which really slowed them down
Piercy Kirke, having survived two proximate attempts on his life had been packed off as Governor of Jamaica by King James just after the turn of the year. Kirke, a dexterous and combative man despite his years had drowned one assailant in a quart of boiling coffee whilst braining two others with a hot skillet during what was to become known as the Oxford Coffee Break.

I will do a feature on the organization of my Creole companies – 1:5 model to man ratio this represents 60 men

Moving on to supposedly quieter circumstances the General found himself tied to a bed which was promptly set ablaze during the Frolic at Faggots. The two wenches accused of this dalliance gone wrong waited tables at the Faggot’s Inn, Finchley but were never traced. Kirke insisted that whilst availing himself of some well-earned rest he dosed off only to be awakened by smoke. 

The Huguenots companies press into Santa Marta with Dutch racing away on the left

Finding himself lashed to the bed he used his battlefield voice to raise the alarm and was freed by a stable boy. The general was sorely blistered and remained in danger of his life for two weeks having suffered excruciatingly in the nether regions of his body. Kirke’s dispatch to the Tropics prompted the King to be persuaded by advisers such as Sarsfield and Hamilton to have the rascal kept eye upon. 

Kirke rode inland accompanied only by his servant and Sheldon to take command of a few companies of Creole infantry from the garrison regiment of Colonel Hylton bolstered by some 40 English grenadiers lately arrived from Port Royal. This officer lay sick with ague and his native troops were scattered in outposts across the island. Kirke’s arrival was indeed timely. 
The Dutch captured the redoubt in the foreground but then came under flanking fire
Within two hours of taking command at Santa Marta advanced parties of both de Ruvigny’s and Hamilton’s forces began emerging from the jungle. The latter were somewhat hampered by having to cross a deep stream inhabited by numerous and aggressive crocodiles. At least five men are known to have been taken by the beasts as recorded in the journal of Captain Collaert of the NGWIC.

The Dutch made modest progress over running an outpost but presented no real threat to the position. De Ruvigny’s motley command however succeeded in penetrating Santa Marta and setting some of the huts on fire. A group of diminutive natives stormed the front-line barricades and the situation appeared parlous until a troop of mounted plantation workers charged into the fray and disrupted the Huguenot attack.
Kirke directs the defence against a rabid tribe of diminutive natives and Huguenot Privateers
One company under Captain Samuel Tyler had every one of its 54 men killed or wounded. The English composed themselves and the attackers withdrew back into the bush to lick their wounds. Kirke reported 120 men killed wounded or missing during the action. He grudgingly praised the intervention of Squire Tregarren and his workers likening their charge to that of ‘Berber blackbeards giving chase to Tangier’s English whores’.
Creoles defend English colonial possessions loyally and bravely.
Losses amongst the Williamite forces are difficult to determine as the French did not record native casualties. Estimates place combined Dutch and French losses near 200. Despite his success Kirke abandoned Santa Marta at dusk and fell back on Spanish Town. 
The journey to the Caribbean opened so many doors for us and we had great fun with the whole native tribes dimension. This was a company level action using BLB3 WTK and worked very well.

Solidifying the Ghost Army Part 5 – How far can you get in a week?

Posted on July 7th, 2017 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

A selection of the Ghost Army in the fieldSomething I am frequently asked is “how do you manage to be so productive?”. The answer is quite simple. I don’t have any spare time.Lukas Strom takes an aimed shotMy day job keeps me away from home about 180 d…

Solidifying the Ghost Army Part 5 – How far can you get in a week?

Posted on July 7th, 2017 under , , , , , , , . Posted by

A selection of the Ghost Army in the fieldSomething I am frequently asked is “how do you manage to be so productive?”. The answer is quite simple. I don’t have any spare time.Lukas Strom takes an aimed shotMy day job keeps me away from home about 180 d…

Solidifying the Ghost Army 4 – Weathering the Veterans

Posted on July 3rd, 2017 under , , , , , , . Posted by

Three steps: Painted, Washed down, Weathered – bases unfinishedThe look I wanted to get with these models was a faded, dirty, washed out effect. They have been in the field for over two years without proper resupply from home. If a parade ground look e…

Solidifying the Ghost Army 4 – Weathering the Veterans

Posted on July 3rd, 2017 under , , , , , , . Posted by

Three steps: Painted, Washed down, Weathered – bases unfinishedThe look I wanted to get with these models was a faded, dirty, washed out effect. They have been in the field for over two years without proper resupply from home. If a parade ground look e…

Solidifying the Ghost Army Part 3 Åke Öberg’s Vikingar

Posted on July 1st, 2017 under , , , , , , . Posted by

Åke Öberg’s Vikingar – the raw material – two conversions and three ‘re-equipped’ models
The finished unit –Åke Öberg’s Vikingar

The unit is Veteran under Donnybrook classification and equipped with heavy weapons, in this case battle axes. They are known in my collection as Sergeant Åke Öberg’s Vikingar. His little command are formidable men from the northern provinces of Sweden. Almost inured to the cold but not quite.


I concluded that an army in tatters with pockets of survivors in small bands would be unlikely to use formed pikes. My pikemen sans pikes are armed with battle axes – well actually, sapper’s axes from WLOA926 which is one of the siege packs. I chose to make the sergeant carry a halberd. He is in fact a Russian model.

Leader of the Vikings Sergeant Åke Öberg

Sergeant Åke Öberg has long ago removed the pin backs from his coat to keep a little warmer in the Byelorussian autumn chill.  I have added a Swedish collar to his coat and shaved off the Russian style pockets from the front.

Sergeant Åke Öberg coat is heavily patched.

On campaign these pocket flaps may well have been lost for a variety of wear and tear reasons. I wanted Sergeant Öberg to appear as a formidable character who would be respected by his men and remain calm under any circumstances.All the patches on the coat are dark Russian green and obviously cut from a captured enemy coat.

 Björk in the raw form

Axel Björk painted, weathered and finished 

The bare legged Björk 


Axel Björk is a giant among men and wields his mighty battle axe like a warrior in the age of the Vikings. This model is one of the loading artillerists from SA1. There is no conversion work on him and he also represents a soldier who has removed the turn backs from his coat. He is bare legged which I thought in keeping with his dangerous air.



Gunnarsson in the raw form
One-eyed Rapp Gunnarsson – my favourite model so far




One eyed Rapp Gunnarsson is a shameless homage to Orm Tostesson’s faithful and taciturn retainer from Røde Orm. A quiet but capable warrior who would die for his chief. This model is also one of the artillerists this time from SA3. 


His crouching pose is quiet menacing and the eye patch reinforces this.



There is no conversion work on him and he also represents a soldier who has removed the turn backs from his coat. Rapp has been given a very short sword which is clearly a local weapon and not military issue from Stockholm.


Rapp’s looted sword is clearly visible here



His eye patch was not too tricky to do. I started with a piece of card but at this scale that was too thick and would have looked like a thick bar of chocolate! In the end I used a piece of roughly cut paper glued to the face. The head strap is simply painted on with a 000 brush.



Gustafsson in the raw form with the milliput fur hat built around the karpus




Gustafsson two stages from completion
The completed Gustav Gustafsson

Alternative view of Gustav Gustafsson



Gustav Gustafsson served with the Dal Regiment and retains some semblance of his uniform although he has now adopted a fur trimmed Russian hat to keep out the bitter wind. This is a sergeant figure from S20 with the fur hat made of milliput built around the karpus. Apart from this small conversion the figure has his halberd replaced by an axe.



Svensson in the raw form 
Svensson in his motely – socks from two regiments!
Per Svensson in his motley

Rear view of Svensson



The last axeman is from S4 and wears a piped karpus with his weapon slung confidently over his right shoulder. He clearly knows how to use it. His name is Per Svensson. He wears the uniform of the Narke Varmland regiment. Apart from the addition of the axe there is no conversion work on this figure. He is somewhat motley having have to ‘scrounge’ equipment and clothes. He wears one red sock and one yellow giving him the appearance of a Landsknecht!



Sergeant Åke Öberg’s Vikings in the field!




The final character attached to the Vikings is a sniper. He is a Russian musketeer from R1. He has a very small addition to convert him to a Swede – a coat collar. His buttons have been removed form the cuffs and a hand drill and clippers have roughed up his coat. He has removed his turn backs. His name is Lukas Ström. 



Lukas Ström. 

Lukas Ström. 

Lukas Ström. 





Four of the Vikings raid a Byelorussian village







Solidifying the Ghost Army Part 3 Åke Öberg’s Vikingar

Posted on July 1st, 2017 under , , , , , , . Posted by

Åke Öberg’s Vikingar – the raw material – two conversions and three ‘re-equipped’ models
The finished unit –Åke Öberg’s Vikingar

The unit is Veteran under Donnybrook classification and equipped with heavy weapons, in this case battle axes. They are known in my collection as Sergeant Åke Öberg’s Vikingar. His little command are formidable men from the northern provinces of Sweden. Almost inured to the cold but not quite.


I concluded that an army in tatters with pockets of survivors in small bands would be unlikely to use formed pikes. My pikemen sans pikes are armed with battle axes – well actually, sapper’s axes from WLOA926 which is one of the siege packs. I chose to make the sergeant carry a halberd. He is in fact a Russian model.

Leader of the Vikings Sergeant Åke Öberg

Sergeant Åke Öberg has long ago removed the pin backs from his coat to keep a little warmer in the Byelorussian autumn chill.  I have added a Swedish collar to his coat and shaved off the Russian style pockets from the front.

Sergeant Åke Öberg coat is heavily patched.

On campaign these pocket flaps may well have been lost for a variety of wear and tear reasons. I wanted Sergeant Öberg to appear as a formidable character who would be respected by his men and remain calm under any circumstances.All the patches on the coat are dark Russian green and obviously cut from a captured enemy coat.

 Björk in the raw form

Axel Björk painted, weathered and finished 

The bare legged Björk 


Axel Björk is a giant among men and wields his mighty battle axe like a warrior in the age of the Vikings. This model is one of the loading artillerists from SA1. There is no conversion work on him and he also represents a soldier who has removed the turn backs from his coat. He is bare legged which I thought in keeping with his dangerous air.



Gunnarsson in the raw form
One-eyed Rapp Gunnarsson – my favourite model so far




One eyed Rapp Gunnarsson is a shameless homage to Orm Tostesson’s faithful and taciturn retainer from Røde Orm. A quiet but capable warrior who would die for his chief. This model is also one of the artillerists this time from SA3. 


His crouching pose is quiet menacing and the eye patch reinforces this.



There is no conversion work on him and he also represents a soldier who has removed the turn backs from his coat. Rapp has been given a very short sword which is clearly a local weapon and not military issue from Stockholm.


Rapp’s looted sword is clearly visible here



His eye patch was not too tricky to do. I started with a piece of card but at this scale that was too thick and would have looked like a thick bar of chocolate! In the end I used a piece of roughly cut paper glued to the face. The head strap is simply painted on with a 000 brush.



Gustafsson in the raw form with the milliput fur hat built around the karpus




Gustafsson two stages from completion
The completed Gustav Gustafsson

Alternative view of Gustav Gustafsson



Gustav Gustafsson served with the Dal Regiment and retains some semblance of his uniform although he has now adopted a fur trimmed Russian hat to keep out the bitter wind. This is a sergeant figure from S20 with the fur hat made of milliput built around the karpus. Apart from this small conversion the figure has his halberd replaced by an axe.



Svensson in the raw form 
Svensson in his motely – socks from two regiments!
Per Svensson in his motley

Rear view of Svensson



The last axeman is from S4 and wears a piped karpus with his weapon slung confidently over his right shoulder. He clearly knows how to use it. His name is Per Svensson. He wears the uniform of the Narke Varmland regiment. Apart from the addition of the axe there is no conversion work on this figure. He is somewhat motley having have to ‘scrounge’ equipment and clothes. He wears one red sock and one yellow giving him the appearance of a Landsknecht!



Sergeant Åke Öberg’s Vikings in the field!




The final character attached to the Vikings is a sniper. He is a Russian musketeer from R1. He has a very small addition to convert him to a Swede – a coat collar. His buttons have been removed form the cuffs and a hand drill and clippers have roughed up his coat. He has removed his turn backs. His name is Lukas Ström. 



Lukas Ström. 

Lukas Ström. 

Lukas Ström. 





Four of the Vikings raid a Byelorussian village







Solidifying the Ghost Army Part 2 – Inspiration for characterization

Posted on June 29th, 2017 under , , , , , , . Posted by

Donnybrook has become pretty widely used since its release (despite CH painting himself into the cover!).

Donnybrook is ideally suited to characterisation.  Clarence and I had much fun naming the rather ridiculous characters which pepper the pages of the rule book. A few of our friends appear there in very thin disguise.

The Ghost Army immediately started to lend itself to this characterisation because each Foot unit contained only four models plus two characters and the mounted unit had three models and two characters.

Four of the Ghost Army: Gustafsson, Svensson, Öberg and Abrahamsson

As I decided that a retreating and starving Swedish force was unlikely to attempt to assemble a handful of pikemen into a formation I chose at the planning step to drop the pikemen and equip them with heavy weapons.

Initially I was going for halberds, half pikes and spontoons but then I saw an opportunity to link the 17th century fighting Swedes to the spirit of their Viking and Rus ancestors. Warfare produce a weighty sapper’s axe and so I decided my ‘heavy weapon’ wielding Carolinians would carry sapper’s axes like a 17th century Varangian Guard.

My original version.. nicked by a mate!

And so the link to Røde Orm. If you have not read this book I thoroughly commend it. It is a rite of passage experience for every Scandinavian and is the saga of Røde Orm (Red Serpent), a ginger haired Dane from Skåne who embarks reluctantly on an adventure at aged fifteen and becomes a mighty chief who serves in Spain for the Caliph, England for King Harald Bluetooth and visits the Byzantine Empire to seek treasure in the Ukraine. His brother Are serves as a Varangian.

I can’t recommend this book highly enough

My Gran gave me the book aged twelve having bought it at a jumble sale. I remember my Mum saying to her “I don’t think he should be reading that” – the cover described man sized helpings of murder, arson, robbery and rape!

A BLB Squadron – The Ghost Army has five mounted models – not too many

Gran was a tough old bird and said – let him read it! Thanks Mary, that was indeed a good call!
I have read it eight times since. In English it was published as ‘The Longships’. From its great sweeping adventures both the Richard Widmark movie ‘The Longships’  (1964) and the Kirk Douglas/Tony Curtis movie ‘The Vikings’ (1958) stole their plot lines. Both stories are part of Red Orm’s saga.

Stor Axel (Big Axel!) – one of Sergeant Öberg’s bare legged heavy weapons men.

My Heavy Weapons unit was modelled on Are’s Tostesson’s Varangians. The first unit of the Ghost Army to be completed. It features in detail in a separate post which is next in the series.

Solidifying the Ghost Army Part 2 – Inspiration for characterization

Posted on June 29th, 2017 under , , , , , , . Posted by

Donnybrook has become pretty widely used since its release (despite CH painting himself into the cover!).

Donnybrook is ideally suited to characterisation.  Clarence and I had much fun naming the rather ridiculous characters which pepper the pages of the rule book. A few of our friends appear there in very thin disguise.

The Ghost Army immediately started to lend itself to this characterisation because each Foot unit contained only four models plus two characters and the mounted unit had three models and two characters.

Four of the Ghost Army: Gustafsson, Svensson, Öberg and Abrahamsson

As I decided that a retreating and starving Swedish force was unlikely to attempt to assemble a handful of pikemen into a formation I chose at the planning step to drop the pikemen and equip them with heavy weapons.

Initially I was going for halberds, half pikes and spontoons but then I saw an opportunity to link the 17th century fighting Swedes to the spirit of their Viking and Rus ancestors. Warfare produce a weighty sapper’s axe and so I decided my ‘heavy weapon’ wielding Carolinians would carry sapper’s axes like a 17th century Varangian Guard.

My original version.. nicked by a mate!

And so the link to Røde Orm. If you have not read this book I thoroughly commend it. It is a rite of passage experience for every Scandinavian and is the saga of Røde Orm (Red Serpent), a ginger haired Dane from Skåne who embarks reluctantly on an adventure at aged fifteen and becomes a mighty chief who serves in Spain for the Caliph, England for King Harald Bluetooth and visits the Byzantine Empire to seek treasure in the Ukraine. His brother Are serves as a Varangian.

I can’t recommend this book highly enough

My Gran gave me the book aged twelve having bought it at a jumble sale. I remember my Mum saying to her “I don’t think he should be reading that” – the cover described man sized helpings of murder, arson, robbery and rape!

A BLB Squadron – The Ghost Army has five mounted models – not too many

Gran was a tough old bird and said – let him read it! Thanks Mary, that was indeed a good call!
I have read it eight times since. In English it was published as ‘The Longships’. From its great sweeping adventures both the Richard Widmark movie ‘The Longships’  (1964) and the Kirk Douglas/Tony Curtis movie ‘The Vikings’ (1958) stole their plot lines. Both stories are part of Red Orm’s saga.

Stor Axel (Big Axel!) – one of Sergeant Öberg’s bare legged heavy weapons men.

My Heavy Weapons unit was modelled on Are’s Tostesson’s Varangians. The first unit of the Ghost Army to be completed. It features in detail in a separate post which is next in the series.

Solidifying the Ghost Army Part 1 – The BIG idea

Posted on June 27th, 2017 under , , , , , , . Posted by

A preview of four of the conversions for the Ghost Army

On a recent flight back from New York I hit the creative wall. I intended to use the journey to write something new but found myself simply staring at the screen.. it had been a hard week at the office.
I resorted to trawling through my files of previously written pieces and eventually I came across an almost finished scenario for Donnybrook which was perhaps 18 months to two years old.

It involved the remnants of a Swedish army wending its way across hostile territory in an effort to reach safety and save their colours from marauding Cossacks and Tatars during the latter part of the Great Northern War.

Beaten to the punch – This GNW Donnybrook game was done by a Swedish group at Tactica 2016

The piece was almost finished but not quite, I had obviously abandoned it and forgotten. It chimed with a new uniform guide I have just completed on the Swedish infantry at Poltava which we hope to release soon. In that guide I explore the look of the Swedes after two years of continuous campaigning. I use the term Ghost Army in the guide and that seemed to connect strongly with the unfinished piece for Donnybrook.

There will be five mounted models in the Ghost Army Donnybrook force.

So with a few hours to go and a need to study the backs of my eyelids I drifted away thinking about what I could do with these connected topics. I did manage to bang another couple of hundred words into the article (with eyes open not shut).

A unit of Russian Grenadiers in a Donnybrook setting  – Drilled unit

I also came up with an idea which clicked with yet another idea Clarence and I have been concocting in the kitchen related to Donnybrook and the ‘dark side’. I decided to create the Swedish Ghost Army using Warfare Miniatures in various morphed forms. The force would be small – all Veteran and dressed in an assortment of clothes picked up on campaign.

Conversions I did earlier – these are for a small winter force. 

On the Saturday a great way to beat the jet lag was to get into the workshop and do all the conversions. It took about six hours to select, cut, milliput and refine all but six of the twenty nine models.

The marching unit for the Ghost Army – 4 conversions. Two characters – Sergeant and Drummer

As I did this I decided to adopt a skirmish gaming convention by naming all of the small units and giving each model an individual identity. This in turn linked my mind to one of my favourite novels of all time Røde Orm by Frans Bengtsson.

In the next part of this series I will link Røde Orm, The Ghost Army, Donnybrook (Dark) and the retreat from Poltava with my conversion work and introduce the modifications to the GNW range with which I am rather pleased.

Solidifying the Ghost Army Part 1 – The BIG idea

Posted on June 27th, 2017 under , , , , , , . Posted by

A preview of four of the conversions for the Ghost Army

On a recent flight back from New York I hit the creative wall. I intended to use the journey to write something new but found myself simply staring at the screen.. it had been a hard week at the office.
I resorted to trawling through my files of previously written pieces and eventually I came across an almost finished scenario for Donnybrook which was perhaps 18 months to two years old.

It involved the remnants of a Swedish army wending its way across hostile territory in an effort to reach safety and save their colours from marauding Cossacks and Tatars during the latter part of the Great Northern War.

Beaten to the punch – This GNW Donnybrook game was done by a Swedish group at Tactica 2016

The piece was almost finished but not quite, I had obviously abandoned it and forgotten. It chimed with a new uniform guide I have just completed on the Swedish infantry at Poltava which we hope to release soon. In that guide I explore the look of the Swedes after two years of continuous campaigning. I use the term Ghost Army in the guide and that seemed to connect strongly with the unfinished piece for Donnybrook.

There will be five mounted models in the Ghost Army Donnybrook force.

So with a few hours to go and a need to study the backs of my eyelids I drifted away thinking about what I could do with these connected topics. I did manage to bang another couple of hundred words into the article (with eyes open not shut).

A unit of Russian Grenadiers in a Donnybrook setting  – Drilled unit

I also came up with an idea which clicked with yet another idea Clarence and I have been concocting in the kitchen related to Donnybrook and the ‘dark side’. I decided to create the Swedish Ghost Army using Warfare Miniatures in various morphed forms. The force would be small – all Veteran and dressed in an assortment of clothes picked up on campaign.

Conversions I did earlier – these are for a small winter force. 

On the Saturday a great way to beat the jet lag was to get into the workshop and do all the conversions. It took about six hours to select, cut, milliput and refine all but six of the twenty nine models.

The marching unit for the Ghost Army – 4 conversions. Two characters – Sergeant and Drummer

As I did this I decided to adopt a skirmish gaming convention by naming all of the small units and giving each model an individual identity. This in turn linked my mind to one of my favourite novels of all time Røde Orm by Frans Bengtsson.

In the next part of this series I will link Røde Orm, The Ghost Army, Donnybrook (Dark) and the retreat from Poltava with my conversion work and introduce the modifications to the GNW range with which I am rather pleased.

Warfare Miniatures July Offer – Swedish Battalions @ £25.00

Posted on June 25th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

Battalion SB01 

Swedish Battalion SB03

Well, to celebrate the summer, my birthday month and the continuing march of the GNW project, Warfare have a July 2017 special offer.

S1 x 2 in battalion SB1

S3 x 1 in battalion SB1

S5 x 1 in battalion SB1

Battalion codes:

SB01 Swedes in Tricorne Standing ready
SB02 Swedes in Karpus Standing ready
SB03 Swedes in Tricorne Marching
SB04 Swedes in Karpus Marching

Will all be available for £25.00 ex postage.

S4 x 1 in battalion SB02

Each pack contains 20 models – 10 musketeers, 5 pikemen and 5 Command. As battalion packs are already reduced by 20% this additional saving equates to a 26% discount on normal pack price making each model £1.25.

S7 x 2 in battalion SB03

S1 x 1 in battalion SB03

S5 x1 in battalion SB03

The prices for these battalions will be adjusted in the shop from June 30th.

Dispatch will be within two weeks of order as I am of on my travels to tropical climes once more.

S4 x 2 in battalion SB04

S6 x 1 in battalion SB04

Here is a chance to swell the ranks of your Carolinians! Gå på!


Battalions SB03 (front) and SB01 (rear)


Warfare Miniatures July Offer – Swedish Battalions @ £25.00

Posted on June 25th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

Battalion SB01 

Swedish Battalion SB03

Well, to celebrate the summer, my birthday month and the continuing march of the GNW project, Warfare have a July 2017 special offer.

S1 x 2 in battalion SB1

S3 x 1 in battalion SB1

S5 x 1 in battalion SB1

Battalion codes:

SB01 Swedes in Tricorne Standing ready
SB02 Swedes in Karpus Standing ready
SB03 Swedes in Tricorne Marching
SB04 Swedes in Karpus Marching

Will all be available for £25.00 ex postage.

S4 x 1 in battalion SB02

Each pack contains 20 models – 10 musketeers, 5 pikemen and 5 Command. As battalion packs are already reduced by 20% this additional saving equates to a 26% discount on normal pack price making each model £1.25.

S7 x 2 in battalion SB03

S1 x 1 in battalion SB03

S5 x1 in battalion SB03

The prices for these battalions will be adjusted in the shop from June 30th.

Dispatch will be within two weeks of order as I am of on my travels to tropical climes once more.

S4 x 2 in battalion SB04

S6 x 1 in battalion SB04

Here is a chance to swell the ranks of your Carolinians! Gå på!


Battalions SB03 (front) and SB01 (rear)


Warfare Miniatures French troops of Louis XIV

Posted on June 19th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

Gardes FrancaisesIt is true, we have somewhat neglected both the European theatre and the French army on the blog. There are a variety of reasons for that but these are mostly a positive focus on other theatres rather than an anti Flanders bias.Gardes …

Warfare Miniatures French troops of Louis XIV

Posted on June 19th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

Gardes FrancaisesIt is true, we have somewhat neglected both the European theatre and the French army on the blog. There are a variety of reasons for that but these are mostly a positive focus on other theatres rather than an anti Flanders bias.Gardes …

Battle for Britain 1693.. campaigning opening shots

Posted on June 13th, 2017 under , , , . Posted by

The 1693 campaign season opened with three contrasting scenarios reflecting the differing challenges facing each of the commanders depending on where they found themselves at the close of 1692.Kilbryde 1693 – site of the conventicle (assembling around …

Battle for Britain 1693.. campaigning opening shots

Posted on June 13th, 2017 under , , , . Posted by

The 1693 campaign season opened with three contrasting scenarios reflecting the differing challenges facing each of the commanders depending on where they found themselves at the close of 1692.Kilbryde 1693 – site of the conventicle (assembling around …

Warfare ECW/TYW releases

Posted on June 8th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

Line of of three of the 10 Harquebusiers

This is a departure from our core period but an exciting one nonetheless. We have an initial release of nine sculpts of cavalry for the English Civil War / Thirty Years War period.

Montero and buff clothing

The dress of these ‘Harquebusiers’ is a mixture of armoured and unarmoured with lobster helmets, soft hats and montero caps. We have charging and resting poses both with swords and pistols.

Front view of the same figure

The saddles are integral to the riders. The definition on the models is very crisp with characterful faces and painting them was extremely easy and pleasurable.

This is one of the small horses in the standing pose

This first article shows three of the models which I have managed to squeeze into my painting schedule between lots of GNW and WSS pieces. I have tried to show different colours -tawny, crimson and blue sashes and different shades on the buff coats.

A more TYW colour scheme – hatted man on small galloping horse

I am an enthusiast about the period 1618-1648 and in fact my Pike & Shot passion began with the campaigns of Montrose, moving to the late 17th century about six or seven years after spending a lot of time collecting ECW and TYW models.

The ‘Swedish’ chap again

Where might Warfare Miniatures go with this diversion? Well, we are financially robust and a significant expansion is possible but that will somewhat depend on the response to these first 10 models.

I avoided as much as possible black and white when painting these models

The horse variants available to us now are significant. These models sit equally well on small, medium or large mounts and as can be seen, on standing or moving mounts.

A large trotting horse with a Royalist or Imperialist Harquebusier

I particularly enjoyed painting the armoured model which has a back and breast plus helmet configuration. Four (perhaps five, I just can’t remember right now) of the models in the range have lobster helmets.

Same chap – three other helmeted models will make up an exciting unit

Tw models have montero caps and the remainder have soft hats. All have buff coats. The models are all master moulded and we can go to production pretty quickly.

A final view of one of the first three sculpts

I am in no great hurry to release these models and I will be interested in the market response and potential demand for them. Pricing will be in line with normal Warfare Miniatures cavalry packs with 3 models and horses in a pack with a price of £8.50.

The trio having swapped mounts

I don’t normally actively solicit comment on models and leave that to the discretion of Blog followers but I would be particularly interested in the appetite for a dalliance in this period from Warfare.

Warfare ECW/TYW releases

Posted on June 8th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

Line of of three of the 10 Harquebusiers

This is a departure from our core period but an exciting one nonetheless. We have an initial release of nine sculpts of cavalry for the English Civil War / Thirty Years War period.

Montero and buff clothing

The dress of these ‘Harquebusiers’ is a mixture of armoured and unarmoured with lobster helmets, soft hats and montero caps. We have charging and resting poses both with swords and pistols.

Front view of the same figure

The saddles are integral to the riders. The definition on the models is very crisp with characterful faces and painting them was extremely easy and pleasurable.

This is one of the small horses in the standing pose

This first article shows three of the models which I have managed to squeeze into my painting schedule between lots of GNW and WSS pieces. I have tried to show different colours -tawny, crimson and blue sashes and different shades on the buff coats.

A more TYW colour scheme – hatted man on small galloping horse

I am an enthusiast about the period 1618-1648 and in fact my Pike & Shot passion began with the campaigns of Montrose, moving to the late 17th century about six or seven years after spending a lot of time collecting ECW and TYW models.

The ‘Swedish’ chap again

Where might Warfare Miniatures go with this diversion? Well, we are financially robust and a significant expansion is possible but that will somewhat depend on the response to these first 10 models.

I avoided as much as possible black and white when painting these models

The horse variants available to us now are significant. These models sit equally well on small, medium or large mounts and as can be seen, on standing or moving mounts.

A large trotting horse with a Royalist or Imperialist Harquebusier

I particularly enjoyed painting the armoured model which has a back and breast plus helmet configuration. Four (perhaps five, I just can’t remember right now) of the models in the range have lobster helmets.

Same chap – three other helmeted models will make up an exciting unit

Tw models have montero caps and the remainder have soft hats. All have buff coats. The models are all master moulded and we can go to production pretty quickly.

A final view of one of the first three sculpts

I am in no great hurry to release these models and I will be interested in the market response and potential demand for them. Pricing will be in line with normal Warfare Miniatures cavalry packs with 3 models and horses in a pack with a price of £8.50.

The trio having swapped mounts

I don’t normally actively solicit comment on models and leave that to the discretion of Blog followers but I would be particularly interested in the appetite for a dalliance in this period from Warfare.