Posts Tagged ‘WWII’

Tanker’s Tuesday : Jagdpanzer 38(t) Hetzer

Posted on November 28th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

By 1943 it was obvious to the Germans that their tank production could not keep pace with battlefield losses. One of their efforts to expedite weapons production was the conversion of old, outdated tank chassis into tank destroyers, or Jagdpanzers. …

Tanker’s Tuesday : Jagdpanzer 38(t) Hetzer

Posted on November 28th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

By 1943 it was obvious to the Germans that their tank production could not keep pace with battlefield losses. One of their efforts to expedite weapons production was the conversion of old, outdated tank chassis into tank destroyers, or Jagdpanzers. …

28mm WW2 Commission: Sealion and More

Posted on November 24th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

Another WWII commission. This one has some units for Sealion and pulp scenarios, and other units.First up some homeguard figures. Some Footsore, I think, Artizan Designs, and Warlord Games:Dad’s ArmyPartisansDowned Luftwaffe PilotBritish CommandosField…

28mm WW2 Commission: Sealion and More

Posted on November 24th, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

Another WWII commission. This one has some units for Sealion and pulp scenarios, and other units.First up some homeguard figures. Some Footsore, I think, Artizan Designs, and Warlord Games:Dad’s ArmyPartisansDowned Luftwaffe PilotBritish CommandosField…

Brooklands Military Vehicles Day

Posted on November 19th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Yesterday I went to the Brooklands Motor Museum in Surrey for their Military Vehicle event. Its probably the last such event of the year for me and one that I haven’t been to before so I was looking forward to it. I have been to Brooklands before though, a few years ago I was here for a corporate day with my old firm. When I and my boss finished the event we spent a couple of hours exploring the site before heading home, our ‘official’ reason for being there completely forgotten! This time I was able to take my time looking around the site and unlike my last visit I came equipped with a decent camera. 

Brooklands was the world’s first purpose-built motor racing circuit. Local landowner Hugh Locke King wanted a race track but it was the design genius of Colonel H.C.L. Holden that saw it develop into the 3¼ mile concrete banked circuit that became synonymous with British motor racing. Work commenced in late 1906 and was completed in just nine months with the first race in July 1907. Very soon afterwards the site also began its long association with aircraft design and testingBAC, Bleriot, British Aerospace, Hawker, Sopwith and Vickers have all tested here and it is estimated that over 18,600 new aircraft of nearly 250 types were first flown, manufactured or assembled at Brooklands. (Source: www.brooklandsmuseum.com).

The museum boasts a wide range of exhibits, from its Aircraft Hanger; Workshops; Motoring Sheds including an exhibition of British Grand-Prix racing vehicles; a selection of aircraft including Concord outside; and of course the remaining sections of race track and banking which have recently been restored. The Military Vehicle rally was just the sort of excuse I needed to revisit this excellent museum and explore it properly. 


Bedford RL Recovery Vehicle

Bedford RL Recovery Vehicle

German BMW and sidecar in North Africa colours

Harrier Jump Jet

105mm Howitzer

Austin 7 Bomb Disposal Vehicle

Barnes Wallis ‘Grand Slam’ Bomb – 10 ton of awesomeness! 

Vickers Vimy Replica

‘Aircraft Factory’ display featuring a Wellington Bomber

The wellington has been restored but the skin left off so you can see the latticework frame designed by Barnes Wallis
Test Hill – This 1:8 Gradient is a tough challenge for some vehicles

The new ‘Aircraft Factory’ hanger

The Taureg was classed as a remote area patrol vehicle and was one of only two built to order for an unknown African or Arabian customer in 1978. 

M3A1 White Scout Car

Despite the cold weather it remained sunny all day ensuring a good day was had by all.

Brooklands Military Vehicles Day

Posted on November 19th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Yesterday I went to the Brooklands Motor Museum in Surrey for their Military Vehicle event. Its probably the last such event of the year for me and one that I haven’t been to before so I was looking forward to it. I have been to Brooklands before though, a few years ago I was here for a corporate day with my old firm. When I and my boss finished the event we spent a couple of hours exploring the site before heading home, our ‘official’ reason for being there completely forgotten! This time I was able to take my time looking around the site and unlike my last visit I came equipped with a decent camera. 

Brooklands was the world’s first purpose-built motor racing circuit. Local landowner Hugh Locke King wanted a race track but it was the design genius of Colonel H.C.L. Holden that saw it develop into the 3¼ mile concrete banked circuit that became synonymous with British motor racing. Work commenced in late 1906 and was completed in just nine months with the first race in July 1907. Very soon afterwards the site also began its long association with aircraft design and testingBAC, Bleriot, British Aerospace, Hawker, Sopwith and Vickers have all tested here and it is estimated that over 18,600 new aircraft of nearly 250 types were first flown, manufactured or assembled at Brooklands. (Source: www.brooklandsmuseum.com).

The museum boasts a wide range of exhibits, from its Aircraft Hanger; Workshops; Motoring Sheds including an exhibition of British Grand-Prix racing vehicles; a selection of aircraft including Concord outside; and of course the remaining sections of race track and banking which have recently been restored. The Military Vehicle rally was just the sort of excuse I needed to revisit this excellent museum and explore it properly. 


Bedford RL Recovery Vehicle

Bedford RL Recovery Vehicle

German BMW and sidecar in North Africa colours

Harrier Jump Jet

105mm Howitzer

Austin 7 Bomb Disposal Vehicle

Barnes Wallis ‘Grand Slam’ Bomb – 10 ton of awesomeness! 

Vickers Vimy Replica

‘Aircraft Factory’ display featuring a Wellington Bomber

The wellington has been restored but the skin left off so you can see the latticework frame designed by Barnes Wallis
Test Hill – This 1:8 Gradient is a tough challenge for some vehicles

The new ‘Aircraft Factory’ hanger

The Taureg was classed as a remote area patrol vehicle and was one of only two built to order for an unknown African or Arabian customer in 1978. 

M3A1 White Scout Car

Despite the cold weather it remained sunny all day ensuring a good day was had by all.

20mm WWII French Order

Posted on November 18th, 2017 under , , , . Posted by

Here’s another of the older projects I did a bit back. I will probably continue posting some of the older work mixed in with the newer work to try and catch up a bit on the blog.This is an order for a 20mm WW2 French force. All figures were FAA.There w…

20mm WWII French Order

Posted on November 18th, 2017 under , , , . Posted by

Here’s another of the older projects I did a bit back. I will probably continue posting some of the older work mixed in with the newer work to try and catch up a bit on the blog.This is an order for a 20mm WW2 French force. All figures were FAA.There w…

Tanker’s Tuesday: 628th Tank Destroyer Battalion

Posted on November 13th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

In September 1942, the entire Battalion was moved by rail to the newly formed Tank Destroyer Center at Camp Hood, Texas, to undergo advanced unit training in Tank Destroyer tactics. After progressing through the infiltration course, street and villa…

Tanker’s Tuesday: 628th Tank Destroyer Battalion

Posted on November 13th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

In September 1942, the entire Battalion was moved by rail to the newly formed Tank Destroyer Center at Camp Hood, Texas, to undergo advanced unit training in Tank Destroyer tactics. After progressing through the infiltration course, street and villa…

The Shuttleworth Collection

Posted on October 31st, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

The wife and I went away for the weekend for a friends wedding and on the way home we decided to visit the Shuttleworth Collection. I have been meaning to visit this museum for a long time and now that I have been I realise that I am going to have to c…

The Shuttleworth Collection

Posted on October 31st, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

The wife and I went away for the weekend for a friends wedding and on the way home we decided to visit the Shuttleworth Collection. I have been meaning to visit this museum for a long time and now that I have been I realise that I am going to have to c…

Decks are now clear

Posted on October 31st, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Right, I can now relax and get started on the new army, all my little projects that have been hanging around have been done.First up is the two Centurions needed to add to the Twelfth, I could just have left the officers already in the ranks but I like…

Decks are now clear

Posted on October 31st, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Right, I can now relax and get started on the new army, all my little projects that have been hanging around have been done.First up is the two Centurions needed to add to the Twelfth, I could just have left the officers already in the ranks but I like…

My Section 8 Story

Posted on October 26th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

A Quick Backstory Early 2016 was not a good time for me. The first few mouths was nothing but bad thoughts and self-hatred, as well as a complete unwillingness to be around my fellow humans. So how did this I get past such a difficult time? Well among various relaxation techniques and opening myself to new ideas, I found a great new hobby.

The mighty Section 8 Club Logo
 As much as I loved (and still love) the models of games workshop, I wanted to try something new, something I have had a fondness of since I was young; historical models. History is my main passion, an obsessive love I have always carried since I was a child. In august of 2016 I bought a box of Perry Miniatures’ American Civil War cavalry. Now while they were not my finest work, I still enjoyed this great little experiment. When I was at the store where I bought these models, I noticed a flyer for an event- Border Reiver. I was intrigued by this event so a few weeks later in September I went to it along with my Father and a friend. There I met Daveco, whom I’d met before at our local GW. He told me of this great place, a club named “Section 8” that he helped run. Meanwhile at my college course, one of my lecturers told me about a great game called Bolt Action. A game set in WWII, which interested me a lot, so taking the plunge, I got the Russian 500pts army deal that Warlord offered on their site and got to work building and painting a brand new army.
Ordering my SS to stage an ambush behind the farmhouse
 It was my experiences at section 8 I credit with making me a more socially aware person and helped me improve my skills at painting. I shall now list the advantages of this club has well as give some of my own personal insight The advantages The hobby side-This is probably one of the more obvious advantages of going to a club like Section 8. When I first went to the club I was decent at painting sure, but compared to many at the club I wasn’t very good. So how did I improve? Well that was thanks to Stonedrose who is also a very skilled painter. I have started to use Vallejo paints as well as Citadel’s range to diversify my colours. I also became better at painting skin, adding shadow effects to lines within the face. It helped me steady my hand, which is great for any painter to learn (while my hand does still shake, I know better ways to control it). While I could go on all day about the techniques I’ve learnt I shall list just one more, and that is basing. I never really used to bother with putting sand, paint and grass (among other things) on my bases but now, I do, putting a lot of work into making them look good (even if they can be overly tedious at times). 
 The social aspect
So what makes a good club? Well honestly I would say that the answer would be the community built around said club. Autistic people like myself are often stereotyped as being socially unaware and being bad around their peers. While this stereotype does not always apply to everyone who is autistic, it almost certainly applied to pre-club me. I was often scared off by adult conversations due to my own strongly held values. And yet thanks to the club my tolerance levels for things I once saw as “annoying” or “uncivilized” have increased drastically. While of course the therapy I have received helped with this but what really helped was the club. I love the people at the club for while they can sometimes act the fool they do it in a comedic context and well getting used to such humour is an important part of growing up. Heck, I feel that it has helped me get ready to eventually enter the world of work once my college studies are over. Wargames including myself can be eccentric at times but they are like a second family for me, and they are all good people. 
Membership
One of the problem the North East has is money. In our current society, money, an artificial price that has no basis in nature, faith or evolution, dictates how we live our lives. Yeah it is pretty sad but why does it matter to the club? Well that is because with membership a whole afternoon and most of an evening of fun could be yours for just £2.50. What more could you want? After all the cinema is £10 for 2-3 hours… 
Terrain

What is the advantage of playing at a club compared to say doing something at home or going to a local store? Well at home you may not have all of the things you need to make a convincing battle (after all there’s not a lot of buildings that are shaped like coke cans!) while at a store, well you might end up spending money that you previously had no intention of buying, for that is a major peril hobbyists must deal with. Meanwhile at Section 8 we have a ton of terrain you can use; whole boxes in fact! Everything from 40k ruins to Northern European homesteads as well as the general stuff like hills and trenches. All fully based and painted with matching gaming mats. 
The Games
We play a lot of things at the club including games such as Horus Heresy, 40k, Bolt Action, Blitzkrieg Commander, Warmachine and so much more. The game I currently play at the club is Bolt Action, for which I have a large and ever expanding collection of soldiers from the Soviet Red Army and the German Waffen SS, with a whole number of ideas for secondary armies to eventually get my hands on. One great advantage of playing here is the lack of “powergamers”. While there is one or two people who swing that way, most here build armies that are more about exploring historical/loreful events or just to have fun. And if these games do not tickle your fancy? Well we have plenty of board games you can try your hand at to, games that I think my peers are likely to share with you in other articles on this great blog.

My Section 8 Story

Posted on October 26th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

A Quick Backstory Early 2016 was not a good time for me. The first few mouths was nothing but bad thoughts and self-hatred, as well as a complete unwillingness to be around my fellow humans. So how did this I get past such a difficult time? Well among various relaxation techniques and opening myself to new ideas, I found a great new hobby.

The mighty Section 8 Club Logo
 As much as I loved (and still love) the models of games workshop, I wanted to try something new, something I have had a fondness of since I was young; historical models. History is my main passion, an obsessive love I have always carried since I was a child. In august of 2016 I bought a box of Perry Miniatures’ American Civil War cavalry. Now while they were not my finest work, I still enjoyed this great little experiment. When I was at the store where I bought these models, I noticed a flyer for an event- Border Reiver. I was intrigued by this event so a few weeks later in September I went to it along with my Father and a friend. There I met Daveco, whom I’d met before at our local GW. He told me of this great place, a club named “Section 8” that he helped run. Meanwhile at my college course, one of my lecturers told me about a great game called Bolt Action. A game set in WWII, which interested me a lot, so taking the plunge, I got the Russian 500pts army deal that Warlord offered on their site and got to work building and painting a brand new army.
Ordering my SS to stage an ambush behind the farmhouse
 It was my experiences at section 8 I credit with making me a more socially aware person and helped me improve my skills at painting. I shall now list the advantages of this club has well as give some of my own personal insight The advantages The hobby side-This is probably one of the more obvious advantages of going to a club like Section 8. When I first went to the club I was decent at painting sure, but compared to many at the club I wasn’t very good. So how did I improve? Well that was thanks to Stonedrose who is also a very skilled painter. I have started to use Vallejo paints as well as Citadel’s range to diversify my colours. I also became better at painting skin, adding shadow effects to lines within the face. It helped me steady my hand, which is great for any painter to learn (while my hand does still shake, I know better ways to control it). While I could go on all day about the techniques I’ve learnt I shall list just one more, and that is basing. I never really used to bother with putting sand, paint and grass (among other things) on my bases but now, I do, putting a lot of work into making them look good (even if they can be overly tedious at times). 
 The social aspect
So what makes a good club? Well honestly I would say that the answer would be the community built around said club. Autistic people like myself are often stereotyped as being socially unaware and being bad around their peers. While this stereotype does not always apply to everyone who is autistic, it almost certainly applied to pre-club me. I was often scared off by adult conversations due to my own strongly held values. And yet thanks to the club my tolerance levels for things I once saw as “annoying” or “uncivilized” have increased drastically. While of course the therapy I have received helped with this but what really helped was the club. I love the people at the club for while they can sometimes act the fool they do it in a comedic context and well getting used to such humour is an important part of growing up. Heck, I feel that it has helped me get ready to eventually enter the world of work once my college studies are over. Wargames including myself can be eccentric at times but they are like a second family for me, and they are all good people. 
Membership
One of the problem the North East has is money. In our current society, money, an artificial price that has no basis in nature, faith or evolution, dictates how we live our lives. Yeah it is pretty sad but why does it matter to the club? Well that is because with membership a whole afternoon and most of an evening of fun could be yours for just £2.50. What more could you want? After all the cinema is £10 for 2-3 hours… 
Terrain

What is the advantage of playing at a club compared to say doing something at home or going to a local store? Well at home you may not have all of the things you need to make a convincing battle (after all there’s not a lot of buildings that are shaped like coke cans!) while at a store, well you might end up spending money that you previously had no intention of buying, for that is a major peril hobbyists must deal with. Meanwhile at Section 8 we have a ton of terrain you can use; whole boxes in fact! Everything from 40k ruins to Northern European homesteads as well as the general stuff like hills and trenches. All fully based and painted with matching gaming mats. 
The Games
We play a lot of things at the club including games such as Horus Heresy, 40k, Bolt Action, Blitzkrieg Commander, Warmachine and so much more. The game I currently play at the club is Bolt Action, for which I have a large and ever expanding collection of soldiers from the Soviet Red Army and the German Waffen SS, with a whole number of ideas for secondary armies to eventually get my hands on. One great advantage of playing here is the lack of “powergamers”. While there is one or two people who swing that way, most here build armies that are more about exploring historical/loreful events or just to have fun. And if these games do not tickle your fancy? Well we have plenty of board games you can try your hand at to, games that I think my peers are likely to share with you in other articles on this great blog.
This is a contributory article from a Section 8 member, pseudonym TBA

Painting British WWII tanks using an armoured car!

Posted on October 18th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Hello again, this time I’m going to talk through how I paint my bolt action British tanks. To do it step by step I needed an example and I have no tanks left to do so here’s a British AEC armoured car mark III from warlord games. It’s a 1/56th scale mo…

Painting British WWII tanks, using an armoured car!

Posted on October 17th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

Hello again, this time I’m going to talk through how I paint my bolt action British tanks. To do it step by step I needed an example and I have no tanks left to do so here’s a British AEC armoured car mark III from warlord games. It’s a 1/56th scale mo…

Small yet Mighty!

Posted on October 15th, 2017 under , , , . Posted by

Most of the posts on this Blog will cover the broad aspects of games, painting and collecting. People who follow it will have seen some of the models we have. But these models and the games they are used in depict only tiny snippet or window into that world. A large game, let us make an example of Horus Heresy (a game best suited to large battles from the dawn of the Imperium) might have a 100+ models and a good handful of tanks. It stirs the soul for us Wargamers when we see two lovingly painted forces clash on themed terrain. When you play those games, you can well imagine yourself as a fearless hero leading your forces to battle. In Horus Heresy and even Historical games like Bolt Action.

But You can have more…

This article will be about even bigger games again. Now not all of us can afford a football pitch sized table and fighter command Battle of Britain style move sticks to shuffle the forces around. Enter the 10mm Wargame! Most of the Games we play are around the 28mm size (Heroic scale or 1/54 scale) 10mm Scale is a different monster. Many of you will remember Epic and Warmaster, it’s this style of games I am talking about today!

This is my late war American Army. Left to right  (Models on small round bases are Recce units and are a mix of M5 Stuart Tanks, M8 Greyhounds and Willis Jeeps) Models on square bases are HQs and or Artillery.




Top: M26 Pershing Tank Company, Sherman Tank Battalion (including 76mm, 75mm and 105mm Sherman variants) 2nd Sherman Tank Battalion (same as first) Anti-Tank Battalion (M10s and M18s with a fully company of 76mm Anti-tank guns and 2 Artillery Companies (x1 with Priest SPGs and x1 with 105mm guns with trucks).

Middle: Mechanised Regiment (x3 Battalions mounted in Trucks and Halftraks). Engineering Battalion

Bottom: Old Blood and Guts Patton himself! Then an Infantry Regiment (x3 over strength battalions)

I have a Japanese army for Bolt Action. That roughly represents two re-enforced platoons form a WWII Japanese army. But for my 10mm Forces I have quite a bit more. When you shrink the scale, you increase the numbers. When you play 10mm games (sometimes called “Grand Scale”) you become more than a front-line commander, you are elevated to an Army Commander! Rather than a dashing and heroic Captain or Lieutenant on a horse at the battle of Waterloo you become Wellington himself. Imagine the film Saving Private Ryan, that for my example is Bolt Action – Squads of soldiers in a desperate battle to survive and achieve their objectives. Now one of my Favourite games is Blitzkrieg Commander – this is like the film The Longest Day. In this game you don’t have time for squads and individual actions, you are too busy fighting the entire D-Day invasion!

Blitzkrieg Commander is a very clever game that borrows from Warmaster and a few other Grand Scale games. It covers all WWII periods and the vast majority of the Forces too. Your army centres around a Commanding Officer (CO) and a number of Headquarters Units (HQ) they in turn are responsible for commanding your forces. Each CO or HQ has a command Value, that determines how effective they are at commanding the forces attached to them.

Quick Example; Each HQ is in Command of a Battalion of Infantry. In that Battalion might be nine platoons of Soldiers accompanied by machine gun, anti-tank, mortar and recon platoons. Then you may have two more battalions of soldiers. Let’s not leave out the support, maybe you could have a tank battalion or two (also needing an HQ) and why not throw in some artillery and air support. 

Oh… you have a Tiger Platoon? Well I have a Tank Regiment!


Sherman Tank Battalion, with HQ (Stuart Command Tank) on a square base and Recce (M5 Stuart Light Tank) On round base


 Blood and Guts Patton, Take care he will slap any privates not up for the job!

Now you don’t just fight a one of the many battles on D-Day, you fight THE battle of D-Day. 

Small scale yet Mighty Games!

All of the Models shown are from Pendraken Miniatures with the Exception of the x3 M26 Pershing Tanks, that are from Pithead miniatures.

Small yet Mighty!

Posted on October 15th, 2017 under , , , . Posted by

Most of the posts on this Blog will cover the broad aspects of games, painting and collecting. People who follow it will have seen some of the models we have. But these models and the games they are used in depict only tiny snippet or window into that world. A large game, let us make an example of Horus Heresy (a game best suited to large battles from the dawn of the Imperium) might have a 100+ models and a good handful of tanks. It stirs the soul for us Wargamers when we see two lovingly painted forces clash on themed terrain. When you play those games, you can well imagine yourself as a fearless hero leading your forces to battle. In Horus Heresy and even Historical games like Bolt Action.

But You can have more…

This article will be about even bigger games again. Now not all of us can afford a football pitch sized table and fighter command Battle of Britain style move sticks to shuffle the forces around. Enter the 10mm Wargame! Most of the Games we play are around the 28mm size (Heroic scale or 1/54 scale) 10mm Scale is a different monster. Many of you will remember Epic and Warmaster, it’s this style of games I am talking about today!

This is my late war American Army. Left to right  (Models on small round bases are Recce units and are a mix of M5 Stuart Tanks, M8 Greyhounds and Willis Jeeps) Models on square bases are HQs and or Artillery.




Top: M26 Pershing Tank Company, Sherman Tank Battalion (including 76mm, 75mm and 105mm Sherman variants) 2nd Sherman Tank Battalion (same as first) Anti-Tank Battalion (M10s and M18s with a fully company of 76mm Anti-tank guns and 2 Artillery Companies (x1 with Priest SPGs and x1 with 105mm guns with trucks).

Middle: Mechanised Regiment (x3 Battalions mounted in Trucks and Halftraks). Engineering Battalion

Bottom: Old Blood and Guts Patton himself! Then an Infantry Regiment (x3 over strength battalions)

I have a Japanese army for Bolt Action. That roughly represents two re-enforced platoons form a WWII Japanese army. But for my 10mm Forces I have quite a bit more. When you shrink the scale, you increase the numbers. When you play 10mm games (sometimes called “Grand Scale”) you become more than a front-line commander, you are elevated to an Army Commander! Rather than a dashing and heroic Captain or Lieutenant on a horse at the battle of Waterloo you become Wellington himself. Imagine the film Saving Private Ryan, that for my example is Bolt Action – Squads of soldiers in a desperate battle to survive and achieve their objectives. Now one of my Favourite games is Blitzkrieg Commander – this is like the film The Longest Day. In this game you don’t have time for squads and individual actions, you are too busy fighting the entire D-Day invasion!

Blitzkrieg Commander is a very clever game that borrows from Warmaster and a few other Grand Scale games. It covers all WWII periods and the vast majority of the Forces too. Your army centres around a Commanding Officer (CO) and a number of Headquarters Units (HQ) they in turn are responsible for commanding your forces. Each CO or HQ has a command Value, that determines how effective they are at commanding the forces attached to them.

Quick Example; Each HQ is in Command of a Battalion of Infantry. In that Battalion might be nine platoons of Soldiers accompanied by machine gun, anti-tank, mortar and recon platoons. Then you may have two more battalions of soldiers. Let’s not leave out the support, maybe you could have a tank battalion or two (also needing an HQ) and why not throw in some artillery and air support. 

Oh… you have a Tiger Platoon? Well I have a Tank Regiment!


Sherman Tank Battalion, with HQ (Stuart Command Tank) on a square base and Recce (M5 Stuart Light Tank) On round base


 Blood and Guts Patton, Take care he will slap any privates not up for the job!

Now you don’t just fight a one of the many battles on D-Day, you fight THE battle of D-Day. 

Small scale yet Mighty Games!

All of the Models shown are from Pendraken Miniatures with the Exception of the x3 M26 Pershing Tanks, that are from Pithead miniatures.

Japanese Attack!

Posted on October 6th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

The Imperial Japanese Army, ready for war.Here is a quick painting guide for the Japanese Infantry.Step A1: Primer – Halfords brand Grey primer2: Vallejo Japanese Army Uniform – Tunic and Trousers3: Vallejo Violet-Brown – Putties4: Vallejo German Cammo…

Japanese Attack!

Posted on October 6th, 2017 under , , , , . Posted by

The Imperial Japanese Army, ready for war.Here is a quick painting guide for the Japanese Infantry.Step A1: Primer – Halfords brand Grey primer2: Vallejo Japanese Army Uniform – Tunic and Trousers3: Vallejo Violet-Brown – Putties4: Vallejo German Cammo…

Too Many Big Cats

Posted on October 4th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

I’m back and suffering holiday blues along with jet lag, I really do not want to serve the great British public at the moment, but needs must. I was going to give the club a miss this week as by late afternoon all I want to do is lie down in a darkened…

Too Many Big Cats

Posted on October 4th, 2017 under , , . Posted by

I’m back and suffering holiday blues along with jet lag, I really do not want to serve the great British public at the moment, but needs must. I was going to give the club a miss this week as by late afternoon all I want to do is lie down in a darkened…

Tanker’s Tuesday: British Tank List

Posted on October 3rd, 2017 under , , , , , . Posted by

British Tank List:Challenger II  10 eachChieftain   10 eachCenturion  30 eachComet       10 eachConquer    10 eachCromwell  10 eachChallenger (WWII) 3 eachChurchill   10 ea…