1:27.7


An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Wooden Fence part two

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In these latest posts I will update the Blog with 'work-in-progress' images and text showing how the initial project is developing. For more information look out for the Narrow Gauge Labels to the right.The wooden fence was glued in place with superglue and I started placing bits and pieces of 'clutter'. At first I was just testing where I wanted the items to go, but then I started to glue them in place and add some weathering powders to the join between items and ground cover.The process took some time, but was great fun and as you can see I have used lots of items of clutter to fill this side of the layout.Most of these items were scratch-built or high

» View Source Article

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Wooden fence

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In these latest posts I will update the Blog with 'work-in-progress' images and text showing how the initial project is developing. For more information look out for the Narrow Gauge Labels to the right.This latest update shows how I modelled the wooden fence that will be fitted to the right hand side of the warehouse (see illustration above and ignore the X).The fence was built from craft lollipop sticks which had been  painted yellow. I first soaked them in a tub of white wine vinegar to remove most of the paint before adding texture with some rough sandpaper and a wire brush. I trimmed the fence panels to size (remembering to add some variety and

» View Source Article

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Ground cover

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In these latest posts I will update the Blog with 'work-in-progress' images and text showing how the initial project is developing. For more information look out for the Narrow Gauge Labels to the right.The main ground cover areas have now been painted and textured. After building up the surface with DAS modelling clay and then sanding it smooth, I added some light texture from fine sand which was glued in place with a mixture of PVA glue and Matt Medium. Later I painted the ground cover with various acrylic paints applied in light washes with some opaque areas 'splodged' in.The concrete wall section to the left (see this post for more details)

» View Source Article

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding detail

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In these latest posts I will update the Blog with 'work-in-progress' images and text showing how the initial project is developing. For more information look out for the Narrow Gauge Labels to the right.The first items of clutter added to the layout were the large oil storage container and some greenery modelled from artificial hanging basket material as seen in the image below while the image above was me placing items to see how they interacted with one another. I had great fun moving items around until I had found what I thought was the perfect position.The low wall (in the centre) has been glued in place with a corrugated cardboard spacer to move it

» View Source Article

A Recent Charity Shop Find - what should I do?

I recently picked up this beautifully illustrated, soft-bound book at a local charity store for just £1.00. My intention was to use the coloured images as enamel signs on my 1:27.7 scale, narrow gauge railway layout but after doing some research I'm now wondering if I should keep the book intact.BackgroundRegular readers will know that I have been working on a narrow gauge railway layout - a shelf layout featuring scratch-built buildings and structures constructed to the rather unusual scale of 1:27.7 or 11mm = 1 foot. For more information check out this label.The mathsNormal HO-OO model railway track has a gauge (the distance between the tracks) of 16.5mm. Divide this by 18 inches (a recognised although rare gauge for industrial and military railways) and you get 11mm to the foot or 1:27.7 scale. In this scale (11mm to the foot) a normal height man would be between 63mm and 65mm tall. Not a common scale - hence all the scratch building.Enamel signs for decorationThe book has many colour (and some black

» View Source Article

Painting Rust Tutorial

As promised, today I will show how I paint rust effects on plastic. Step OneI chose a couple of plain plastic pieces. The white plastic bracket is from a small paint pot tester rack that I picked up from a scrap resources centre in Worceter for free. While the yellow/grey roller is a spare part from a label printer that had just been replaced and was going to be thrown away.Step TwoBoth pieces have been cleaned up and in the case of the white moulding, I have added a couple of plastic tube brackets or hole extensions which were glued in place with superglue.I have roughed up the plastic with some sanding sticks prior to applying paint.Step ThreeI produced this colour chart to show the main colours used. They are;1 - Charred Brown 72.045 Vallejo Game Color2 - 50/50 mix Charred Brown/ Orange Fire3 - Orange Fire 72.008 (Note - I usually use Hot Orange 72.009 but on this occasion I had run out)4 - Rusty Patina a textured craft paint that I have been experimenting with. I find that the texturing is a little t

» View Source Article

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twenty-seven

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.The strangely shaped oil can to the rear right was copied from a similar can seen at the Bewdley Town Museum earlier this year. I was not able to get close enough to measure it, so I have estimated the size and I think I may have made it a little too big. It was made by gluing layers of 3mm thick plastic card together and wrapping with aluminium foil. The handle was more foil and the spout was a shor

» View Source Article

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twenty-six

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.The two gas bottles above may look like the ones from the 1/35th scale Italeri Field Set, but they are in fact scratch-built using large plastic knitting needles that I 'turned' on a Black and Decker hand drill using pretty rudimentary tools. The caps and dials were scrounged from the Italeri set and glued in place with superglue. Painting followed my usual basecoat of acrylic paints then blending wi

» View Source Article

An Industrail Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twenty-five

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.Another post of bits and pieces. From left to right they are; scaffold pole bases. I had seen these at a local building site and thought that they were worth modelling. They are used as bases for the scaffold and are simple metal plates with an upright pole or spike that fits into the bottom of the poles. They were made from plastic card and plastic rod. The thinner poles/tubes are plastic tubing, wh

» View Source Article

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twenty-four

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.Seven metal petrol cans. These 2 gallon petrol/oil cans were inspired by a second-hand SHELL petrol can I saw at The Severn Valley Railway, the Bewdley station last month. At the time I didn't have a ruler or tape measure with me and was trying to scale the cans with a piece of scrap paper and taking images with my camera. A volunteer asked what I was doing and when I told him, he very kindly found m

» View Source Article

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twenty-three

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.Today's update shows even more bits of clutter for the 1:27.7 scale layout. The larger, cut-down oil drum was scratch-built from an aluminium food tray, the smaller drum and green bucket were from the 1/35th scale Italeri Field Set while the metal poles are various plastic rod and strips, either shop bought or scrap plastic from the spares box. In all cases the painting was brush painted or sponged-o

» View Source Article

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twenty-two

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.These three items were modelled from a simple 99p toy tractor picked up in PoundLand. The bucket is a simple re-paint, while the wheel and tire have been modified with holes drilled in the hub and the tyre cut back to show that it is a flat. The rectangular panel is made from plastic card, but the hub is from the tractor's front wheel and glued in place with superglue.All three have been painted with

» View Source Article

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twenty-one

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.The two oil drums are scratch built pieces made from aluminium food trays as described in this earlier post. These were my first attempts at impressing and rolling the foil and as such are experiments that although look OK are a little out of scale or too tall. The blue oil drum was made using the same techniques as the green and yellow oil drum but is taller and not so wide. The rusted exa

» View Source Article

An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twenty

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.The larger piece of exhaust was made from various pieces of plastic tubing, some pen barrels and straws. The metal banding and mounts were either sticky-back plastic and/or strips of aluminium. The demijohn is a modified resin casting detailed with new Green Stuff handles while the rest of the bits are scrap plastic found in my bits box or scrounged from work.Painting was done with the same technique

» View Source Article