any system


Random 5 Room Dungeon Generator

I had meant to do this for the August RPG Blog Carnival but missed it due to real-life problems.  However the idea stuck in my head so now it's here, hope you enjoy.Image (cc) miszlaThis generator uses the 5 Room Dungeon model, which I always think works better as themes/areas than explicit rooms so the results are designed as hooks and inspiration so it fits better into your campaign.  As always, roll a set of polyhedral dice or use the JavaScript roller at the bottom of the post...The d20 - The entrance:is up (or down) a sheer cliff.has become the lair of a beast.is hidden by thorny undergrowth.has soldiers camped outside.has sunk underwater.is guarded by a magical construct.was magically sealed.is guarded by an intelligent undead.has collapsed, is there an alternative?is haunted by vengeful spirits.requires a lost key (or keys) to open.is guarded by the local militia.is not located where the maps say it is.has been infested with giant vermin.can only be accessed using magic.is the home of an elem

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Populating the RPG Planning Grid, or Filling Your PANTS

Let's imagine I'm starting my new campaign, and to keep prep low and help tie all the emerging plotlines together I'm using my 5x5 grid of Places, Antagonists, NPC's, Things, and Scenes.Image (cc) AsymmetricButterflyI need something going on in the background, so I'm just going to roll up a random plot arc:Crafted long ago by Lizardfolk, from the bones of a gargantuan beast to be wielded in a war against Undead, this is a spear of destiny. It makes the wielder speak in the language of the creator until attuned and is well balanced, or somehow blessed or guided, adding +1 to attack rolls. The wielder must avenge the death of the last hero who fell using it to awaken its powers, when it will become a +2 magic weapon that blazes on contact and deals an additional 3d6 damage to the intended enemiesThis might be the main plot arc of the whole campaign, or it may never get any screen-time.  It doesn't matter, it matters that it gives me some elements and a vague idea for a story.  The story can (and will)

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Campaign Planning, Reusability, and Separation of Concern

Some important concepts from my work in computer software can definitely be applied to campaign planning. Let's talk about two of them.Image (cc) Tim ProbertSeparation of ConcernThink of any dungeon* you've seen - or have written - with a map of the layout, lists of encounters for each room, key items and notes on where they are hidden.  How many times have you, as GM, had to skip, rearrange, shuffle or rebuild parts in response to the party's actions? Exactly.Separating the elements means more flexibility.  Generally, the dungeon map doesn't care what monsters lie within and the monsters don't care what important treasures they guard. So if we plan loosely we can make it easier to change or add things on the fly.Let's say instead we have:a handful of dungeon* maps, with or without notes about key featuresa page of magical or plot related items and a list of - or means to generate - treasurea page for each faction/threat with a few common monsters, and some sketches of common encounters at various l

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RPG Blog Carnival - One Roll Fae NPCs

Since my last Carnival post I've been thinking about Faerie NPCs, what sort of things they might want and what interesting trades they might offer unwary PCs … grab a set of polyhedral dice or use the JavaScript roller below to find out!The d6 - TypeDryad or other female FaeSatyr or other male FaeSprite or LeprechaunPixie or FaerieWild Elf or Gnomeman-beast of some kind: Faun, Centaur, Kitsune...The d4 - It has an aspect ofspring - bright green shades, suggestions of flower budssummer - vivid colours, suggestions of flowers in full bloomautumn - red / brown shades, suggestions of fruits and seedswinter - grey or white shades, suggestions of bark or twigsThe d8 - It wearsa silver circletnothingfine clothesstitched ragsa cloakan icon or broocha magic ringhuman skinThe d12 - It carriesa spearitems wrapped in leavesa bowa silver bella staffarmfuls of fruita sworda lock of hairtwo knivesan injured animala cudgela covered basketThe d20 - It wantsto know a secretto dominate someoneto play a trickrevenge on an enemya

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Railroad / Sandbox / Other - The Third Alternative

Image (cc) Dean PetersThere is an age old argument for and against the "Railroad" and the "Sandbox" when it comes to RPG campaigns.Railroads are pre-set linear story paths that the players can break by deviating from them; this is the main criticism that tends to be levelled at traditional published adventures.Sandboxes are environments that let the plots be driven by the players; the GM leaves hooks and clues for them to find but the story follows the players' choices.But these aren't the only options, these are just the options that are easy to publish.Some people love a sandbox.  The Welsh Piper blog has some amazing hex map creation tools perfect for sandbox campaigns and hex crawls are an old-school D&D staple.  The counterpoint is that sandboxes can lack focus - this is one of the many things I agree with The Angry GM about.  Popular opinion is that a railroad is bad, but a railroad is easy to run for new GMs.  Until the players break it and you end up having to write your own ma

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Campaign Planning and Management - 2019 Project

Image (cc) paganjesus on DeviantArtI'm the kind of person who likes to have a project, so I'm setting myself one right here.For years I've been looking for a way to weave the player characters into engaging plots while still keeping prep low and flexibility high, and it finally feels like things are falling into place. My hobby project for the rest of this year is going to be formalising my ideas and getting them down on paper. Electrons. Like so:On DMing, or How I Learned to Let Go and Embrace the Chaos (May)Railroad / Sandbox / Other (June)Reusability and Separation of Concern (July)Using a Grid for Plot Components (August)Populating the Grid (September)Using the Grid for Planning (October)Reshuffling Items in the Grid (November)Example Campaign (December)Sounds manageable, and by the end I'll know if it works or not. Hope you'll follow along. I'll be using this post as an index as I go and post a retrospective at the end, wish me luck!

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RPG Blog Carnival - a band of Fair Folk

Image (cc) amorphisss on DeviantArtFae don't seem to feature much in Dungeons and Dragons games (that I have played) and I think it's probably because they're low challenge in combat. But why would faeries, who are essentially physically weak extradimensional magic users, be interested in engaging in combat when they could be playing to their strengths?By their nature, the Fair Folk are otherworldly, capricious, playful, powerful, and broadly disinterested in us and our world unless they can derive some entertainment or gain.Here are my thoughts on how to take advantage of this nature to have fun at the table:The faerie realm (or the Feywild if you insist) is not part of our realm, so have fun with geometry and geography:Faerie roads can join places in our realm with little concern for their true geographical - or even temporal - relationships.A moment in the faerie realm could be years in ours, or vice versa.Things that are small in one realm can be vast in the other.Fae settlements and buildings do not need

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