Book Review


Book Review: Armies, Legions & Hordes by Dave Taylor

Having just finished reading Dave Taylor's book "Armies, Legions and Hordes", I thought it might be helpful to post a short review.I highly recommend the book and think it's got a place in just about every gamers library.  The pictures are superbly done and it covers both historical and non-historical gaming genres.  (OK, it does skew to sciFi / GW stuff but that's where the majority of tabletop gamers are.)  The writing style is very clear and the graphics layout easy on the eyes.  It's also organized into clear sections by topic for those of you who prefer perusing these materials while in the "private library".  I nether condone nor disparage such behavior.To be honest, this is one of the few hobby "how-to" books I've read cover to cover - mostly I just jump around looking for a specific topic or I find the writing style a bit painful to put up with for long periods of time "It puts the matte medium on the ground cover".Not so with this book - I found it was really fun to read and

» View Source Article

Book Review: Northern Fury - H-Hour by Bart Gauvin and Joel Radunzel

Last week I had to do a bit of air travel for work.  When I know I'll be spending several hours in a fairly small plane (in this case a Saab 340) I tend to download a new book to make the whole thing a little more bearable.  Fortunately for me I knew Northern Fury had just been released on the Amazon Kindle Store - so I hoped I was in for a treat.I feel like there are a lot of parallels between Northern Fury and it's famous (in these circles anyway) predessor, Red Storm Rising.  Both books have a fairly grand scope.  Whilst focusing on specific people (quite a few, like RSR) doing specific things, these things are happening in several locations across the globe, mostly in this book Russia (or a resurgent USSR), Norway and the United States in the case of this book.When Tom Clancy and Larry Bond wrote RSR, they gamed out many of the scenarios - specifically the naval actions - using Mr Bond's Harpoon ruleset to test out various hypothesis.  My understanding was they went with the resul

» View Source Article

Sarthe, août 1944 Histoire d’un Libération

A book review Sarthe, août 1944, Histoire d’un Libération, Fabrice AvoieRecently while doing some research for battles around my house in August 1944 and the American breakout from Normandy through Brittany and Pays de Loire I kept coming across references to this book, so for Christmas I ordered it from the author, to my surprise Fabrice works in Mayenne and we scheduled a rendezvous at my home. Fabrice spent 15 years doing the research on the push from Mayenne department through Sarthe to capture Le Mans and then pushes South and finally the advance North to close the Falaise pocket. Fabrice attended several reunions in Germany, France and America receiving photos and anecdotes from the war from the remaining veterans. Published in French in 2009 it is loaded with information and Photos I have never seen before. A good mix of German units are covered including day to day breakdowns and unit strengths; 9th Panzer, Panzer Lehr, 352nd Infantry Div, 708th Division, 91st infantry Division, 77

» View Source Article

Ballad of Black Tom and A Time of Changes reviewed

I haven’t posted any book reviews in a while. What the heck, time to change that trend. The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle My rating: 4 of 5 stars Victor Lavalle is a writer that hasn’t been on my radar screen until recently. I was introduced to him through an ebook sale and picked up THE BALLAD OF BLACK TOM at a decent price. The fact that this is a retelling of Lovecraft’s HORROR OF RED HOOK, although through the eyes of a black resident of Harlem, was a big draw for me. Lavalle’s version– which gives the reader the point of view of how the events of the Red Hook story would look from the eyes of Charles Thomas Tester, the charismatic would be musician that gets recruited into the service of the main antagonist from the Red Hook story (Robert Suydam). The underlying themes of racism, exclusion and xenophobia, which was prevalent in Lovecraft’s writing, become a foundation for LaValle’s wonderful retelling of the same events from a different perspective. A per

» View Source Article