Books


End of a Saga

Another Saga game last night at the club, as the Saxon lord I was being invaded by Alex's Carolingians, at least I didn't have the Byzantines. After the preliminaries to win the game we had to kill the opposing leader, fair enough. I had thought the Saxons would have the option for javelin armed levy, but no, all bows, these have been completely useless in my battles so far and very often do not even get to loose a volley.Alex did not do anything in the first round apart from load up his 'board' for the coming battle, the Carolingians have a certain Saga thing, along with others armies, which can give them a large advantage in battle but it needs three dice. This suited me as I managed at last to move and shoot my archers, they dealt out death from above to the Carolingian Warriors, five out of eight hit the deck, great start.Alex responded by charging the archers, these guys bravely held off the Hearthguard by not dying in droves but merely retreated a short distance. There now followed some back and forth f

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No Game No Life 1 - Yuu Kamiya

Okay, I LOVE this anime, it's in my top 3 of best series together with Saint Seiya and Gundam.But unfortunatly, it only was adapted for a single season and a movie... so to know how the story continues, one needs the novels, manga's and spinoffs.In this fantasy world, everything's a game - and these gamer siblings play to win!Meet Sora and Shiro, a brother and sister who are loser shut-ins by normal standards.  But these siblings don't play by the rules of the "crappy game" that is average society.  In the world of gaming, this genius pair reigns supreme, their invincible avatar so famous it's the stuff of urban legend.So when a young boy calling himself God summons the siblings to a fantastic alternate world where war is forbidden and all conflicts - even those involving national borders - are decided by the outcome of games, Sora and Shiro have pretty much hit the jackpot.But they soon learn that in this world, humanity, cornered and outnumbered by other species, survives within the confines of on

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Konrad - David Ferring

Book 1 of the Konrad trilogy, this bookseries has reached a bit of a cultstatus amongst Black Library novels...Originally published by Games Workshop in the late 1980s. In a small village somewhere in the Empire, Konrad lives a bad life as an adopted son of the innkeeper.  His only friend is Elyssa, the daughter of the local nobleman.  But as they learn each other things over the years, they discover Konrad has the gift of foresight.But then the village is burned to the ground, it's inhabitants slain, by vile Beastmen.  Konrad is the only survivor, and is soon taken on as a squire by a knight called Wolf.  For five years he pledges his alliance to Wolf, and together they travel to Kislev to fight Chaos and to find an ancient dwarven treasure...A really good book that read as a knife through butter.

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Age of Sigmar: Sylvaneth Battletome – Review

In the short term, the Sylvaneth Battletome is difficult to fault. Whilst the army has a somewhat limited number of units, there are numerous options to personalise your armies and make them more individual. [...] The post Age of Sigmar: Sylvaneth Battletome – Review appeared first on Tabletop Games UK.

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More Holiday Reading

I have two days of work left before I'm officially on holiday, but we're not off to France straight away for a change, as the rest of the family are all away for a week camping or on school activities. This means that, in between a bit of DIY around the house and walking the dog, I will have a few days all on my own to play around with. One thing I will be doing is some serious background reading for my various current projects, including the Sandbox Skirmish 15mm post colonial thing.As I mentioned earlier, I've just expanded my modern US forces for this to build a full platoon with support options, so I thought that this book would be excellent inspiration. I'm not planning to wargame Mogadishu itself but it's very much along the asymmetrical lines of my 'imaginations' contextual setting of the project, for the British, the US and also the French forces that I'm planning to assemble in the longer term.

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Shoot Out

A cool evening last night for the club but I still braved the weather in my shorts, too lazy to change. After being all campaigned out with Bolt Action I decided to drop the first campaign and instead learn from the second. There are things which were wrong and having now fought five games I think I need to use the Patrol Phase from Chain of Command, although I do not like CoC this part has always seemed like a good idea. So instead of a campaign game I took along the Cowboys.A simple shoot out was on the cards, the back story being two mining outfits are at each others throats and one decides to hijack the others latest consignment of gold on its way to the Wells Fargo office, as the escorted wagon arrives in town the boys in Rogan's Bar get all het up and decide to throw down on Main Street.As the Newby Co. men move along the street two Anderson men climb on to the roof of Rogan's and open fire, all hell then breaks loose as the rest of the Anderson men exit the bar the better to take down their opponents.

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Wanted: Dead by Mike Brooks

Part of the series 1 Novella line by Games Workshop's Black Library, this novel is set in the world of Necromunda, a teeming hive full of warring gangs.While on the short side at 118 pages, it does make a good read, even though the end is a bit "as expected".In the teeming hives of Necromunda, from the highest peaks to the lowest depths, life is a constant fight for survival.  When an ambush in the Underhive goes wrong, and a Guilder gets killed, an Escher gang suddenly find themselves outlawed.Now the hunters have become the hunted, and everyone is after their blood - enforcers, bounty hunters, even other gangs.  With their leader dead, Jarene of the Wild Cats has to take control and save the lives of herself and her sisters in arms, as well as restoring the honour of their gang.For the fateful ambush was no accident, and the true culprits need to face justice.A swift read as it is written really well, this novel will be good company for a lazy evening next to your chempowered stove, enjoying your

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Book Review: Painting Wargaming Figures - WWII In The Desert by Andy Singleton

My last book review was quite critical, so I am pleased to say that I am a lot happier with this one.WWII in the Desert by Andy Singleton appears to be the first in a new series of books from Pen and Sword called Painting Wargaming Figures.The subject of the book should need little explanation, covering the four major forces in the desert campaign of World War Two. British and Commonwealth (including Canadian, Australian, Indian, South African, as well as Poles, some French and others), Italian, United States, and German.The layout of the book has been well thought through. The book is split into two sections, Basics, and the actual Painting Guides. The Basics section covers the various tools, paints and varnishes that will be needed and then goes on to explain how to prepare and assemble figures before the painting begins. This covers metal, plastic and resin miniatures and so all bases have been covered (well actually, basing the figures is covered at the end of the painting guides, but you know what I mean

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An NCO and a Gentleman OBE

As I was lying reading 'Normandy 44' by James Holland last night a name came up which I had heard before, Ken Tout, whose book of being a tank crewman during WWII I had heard was a great read and a classsic. I went on to Amazon to see if the book was still available and popped Ken's name in the Search, several books came up and one popped out at me 'How Modest are the Bravest', I suddenly realised I had drawn the maps for that book at the end of last year. I had conversed with Ken, albeit by email, not realising who he was, a real Normandy veteran, Ken is still writing at 95! I feel honoured to have drawn the maps for his book, thankfully he was very happy with my efforts.I think that is Ken second from the right.A celebrity at the Tank Museum.I have enjoyed Holland's book so much that I spent my Fathers Day book token today on two more of his books, I had wanted 'Burma 44' but am happy enough with what I got, I can wait for Burma. I can thoroughly recommend his Normandy book. A few years back I drew the maps

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Age of Sigmar: General’s Handbook 2019 – Review

Covering both casual and competitive play, the General's Handbook 2019 is by no means a bad purchase. It includes a wealth of battle plans, scenarios and new ways to enjoy Games Workshop's fantastical wargame. This coupled with the support for organising events as well as the encouragement for decent etiquette makes the supplement feel like a welcome release. Some parts may not quite hit home, but it succeeds enough that I'd advise not going to your Age of Sigmar games without it. [...] The post Age of Sigmar: General’s Handbook 2019 – Review appeared first on Tabletop Games UK.

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New Recruits

I finished my second French cavalry unit last week, the Apchon Dragoons, a nice red coat with light blue facings, this gives me two cavalry squadrons for each side now. It was time to order up the next batch of SYW figures and I drew back from the Grenadiers I wanted to get two more cavalry units, one each. Now I am not a big fan of painting cavalry and have reduced the squadrons from twelve to eight figures so I came up with a brilliant idea, you get two cavalry flags for the one regiment from GMB and if you just continue to add different squadrons you end up with a lot of flags left over, so why not build two squadrons instead of one. Now the really clever part is that if I ever do need a large unit of cavalry I can combine two eights for sixteen, voila!The not so clever bit comes next, instead of ordering basically the same figures I made a mistake and ordered up a new set for the British, these will not fit as the 10th Dragoons second squadron so I had to order up another set of flags as this lot will be

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Fashioning Regulation, Regulating Fashion: The Uniforms and Dress of the British Army 1800-1815 Volume II

The second part of an investigation into the clothing orders of the late-Georgian British Army, combined and contrasted with an analysis of fashion in the same army - comparing the regulated dress with the 'modes of the army' as revealed by contemporary writing and illustrations.The first quarter of the nineteenth century witnessed a refinement of fashionable masculine dress that has not since been surpassed. Military tailoring inspired a flowering of uniform splendour that continued into the 1830s and sparked an enduring fascination with military costume that still rages today.The army that operated in these cumbersome uniforms managed to achieve fame as one of the most effective British fighting forces ever recognised, and is still remembered and honoured for its achievements. These three strands: the flowering of late Georgian civilian tailoring; of its martial equivalent; and of military excellence on campaign, have gripped the interest and the imagination of the public, and are endlessly revived and recy

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The Hurricats

I'm really enjoying reading Force Benedict but it won't be long before I've finished it, so I was happy to find this digital book on the CAM ships and their Hurricane pilots for 98p. I've read some of the authors books before and the evocative paperback cover art just makes you want to dive in, especially as I have a soft spot for the Hurricane. I'll be looking for some scenario material for Bag the Hun and I'm sure I won't be disappointed. Good stuff!

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Book Review: Wargames Terrain & Buildings - The Napoleonic Wars by Tony Harwood

Tony Harwood has quite a reputation for building attractive wargames scenery so I was very keen to get hold of Pen & Sword Books The Napoleonic Wars, which appears to be the first in a series of books on constructing scenery and buildings for the wargames table.As expected, after a quick flick through the book, Tony has managed to produce a series of interesting buildings that could grace any wargames table. Although it is squarely aimed at the Napoleonic period, I feel that there is plenty here to interest gamers of other periods too as many of the buildings would suit earlier or later periods.A brief skim through will give you a right old treat for the eyes, and even that is enough to inspire terrain ideas.After giving it a thorough read through, I do have a few issues with the book. Firstly, I would like to point out that I am a professional model maker and have been for over 30 years (I have been running an architectural model making workshop at a school of architecture for the past 15 or so years). I

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