Books


Better is the Proud Plaid: The Clothing, Weapons, and Accoutrements of the Jacobites in the '45

One of the most celebrated moments in Scottish history, the Jacobite Rising of 1745 is often romanticised. Drawing on the work of historians and a wide range of contemporary sources, this book seeks to strip away some of the myths surrounding the Jacobite's and the Highland army by looking at what they really wore, what they fought with, and what items they used to show their allegiance to the Prince and the Jacobite cause. Prince Charles Edward Stuart's army and the Jacobite's are examined in detail from their clothes, weapons, and material culture.This lavishly-illustrated book will appeal to anyone interested in the Jacobite Risings: reenactors, wargamers, fans of Outlander, and the Scottish diaspora who, thanks to a growing interest in family history, are keen to know more about their Scottish heritage.

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The Lilies and The Thistle: French Troops in the Jacobite '45'

The Jacobite Rising of 1745 could not have taken place without French support. French ships carried Charles Edward Stuart to Scotland, French gold financed his campaign, and French weapons equipped many of his troops. Yet the actual French military contribution to the campaign was small, and its role is frequently neglected.This book seeks to redress this balance by looking in detail at the French military contribution to the Jacobite ’45: the first detachment of troops to sail with the Prince – who instead of landing in Scotland found themselves caught up in an intense naval battle; the staff officers and professionals who helped Charles organise his army on modern European lines; and the Irish and Scots regulars who fought with distinction at Inverurie, Falkrik, and Culloden.As with many aspects of the ’45, myths and misconceptions aplenty have arisen about the nature and significance of the French contribution. New archival research enables a better picture to be obtained than ever before of the men who ma

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Sea Harrier over the Falklands

I'm about to start re-reading Sea Harrier over the Falklands, which I originally read when it was first published and thoroughly enjoyed. This is partly inspired by having picked up a really cheap second hand starter pack of Flames above the Falklands a couple of weeks ago via eBay, complete with Tumbling Dice 1/600th aircraft. I now have plenty of kit for both the Argentinians and British, together with two copies of the rulebook, but have other things to do for the foreseeable future, even if the air war for the Falklands is something that would be really great as another Wings at War project. I still haven't finalised and finished off my MiG Alley project for a game after all.

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War for the Hell of it

I haven't read any aviation related books for quite a while, so picked this one out as it looked right up my street, even though I have no plans to wargame the Air War in Vietnam. The Wings at War: Thud Ridge rules are probably the closest I'm going to get to wargaming the conflict but who knows? Anyway, I'm always interested in reading first hand autobiographical accounts, as they invariably give you a 'feel' for the period, even if they are highly subjective. I'm looking forward to getting stuck into this one over the weekend.

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Ironclad Inspiration

I found these two books on eBay the other day so decided to add them to the library, on the off chance that they might actually be of some use. In actual fact, they're really interesting, with an informative text and lots of contemporary photographs in a chronological sequence, clearly showing the development of ironclad and pre-dreadnought technology in the Victorian Royal Navy. An excellent addition to the bookshelf!

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Zulu by Saul David

Despite my recent foray into 15mm tanks I am still working away on my Zulu War project (albeit slowly). While I was busy knocking out units for the Painting Challenge I was also avidly reading many of my reference books on the period. One of the most enjoyable was Zulu: Heroism and Tragedy of the Zulu War of 1879 by Saul David. I meant to write up a review at the time but got a little sidetracked so here is a slightly shortened version, late but none the less highly recommended.The book follows the usual format for these type of works, looking at the history of the region in the years leading up to the war of 1879. This sets the scene for a conflict that shouldn't have happened were it not for the ambition of certain individuals and the failure of a colonial system that inevitably ceded regional governors a lot more independence that the government back home would probably have liked.Like so many of the books on this short lived war I often found myself lividly wanting to shout at the idiots in charge through

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The Sino French Naval War

I'm now reading this, having really enjoyed the author's books on the Sino Japanese War and Russo Japanese War, although I have yet to read the second part of the latter which focusses on Tsushima. There's not a great deal of potential for naval wargaming, however, as most of the engagements were either very one sided or in support of land operations, rather than being actions of any significant size. There are lots of gunboats in support of amphibious landings and assaults but not much in the way of anything more substantial.The only real exception is the Battle of Foochow, which ended in a decisive defeat for the Chinese, who were outgunned and outclassed by the more advanced French fleet. The French do have some very cool central battery ironclads and cruisers, however, so it's a paper thin excuse to get some of the later Victorian models from Tumbling Dice. I have a handful of these already but don't think I'll be getting any more, at least not until I have painted my existing earlier Victorian ironclads.

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On the Devil's Tail: In Combat with the Waffen-SS on the Eastern Front 1945, and with the French in Indochina 1951-54

This is the riveting true story of Paul Martelli, a fifteen-year-old German-Italian, who fought in Pomerania, on the Eastern Front, in 1945 as a member of the 33. Waffen-Grenadier-Division der SS "Charlemagne" and, later, as a soldier with French forces during three years (1951-1954) in the Tonkin area, Vietnam.Paul recounts his time at the Sennheim military training base, where he was introduced to the rigorous discipline of body and mind: he then goes back to 1940, during the German invasion of France, when he was still a boy in Lorraine, hinting at his motivations for enlisting with the Waffen SS. He reveals his and many young soldiers' exciting and often humorous escapades at Greifenberg, his first love with a German girl helping refugees, his experiences and feelings during the combats at Körlin, during the strenuous defense of Kolberg, while regrouping at Neustrelitz and at the German defeat. With a companion he ends up at a castle delivering a group of women camp prisoners to a Russian officer, living

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