Classical


More 10mm Illyrians

It has taken some time, but I have finally completed some wee friends for my 10mm Illyrians (see previous posts HERE and HERE). Like their comrades, these are converted Pendraken Celtiberians. There are a few head swaps - this time using Magister Militum peltasts - and modelling putty was used to cover over belts to give the Illyrian-no-belt look. 

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Mortal Gods – Forging your destiny in Classical Greece

Whether you’re a complete novice or a hardened veteran come to mock the weak, I hope that this now ongoing series on Mortal Gods has a bit of something for everyone. I intend to cover [...] The post Mortal Gods – Forging your destiny in Classical Greece appeared first on Tabletop Games UK.

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Another Dux Bellorum clash in Macedonia

My 10mm early Macedonians took to the field again this week for a rematch with Lee's Greeks. The first two games using Dux Bellorum had seen my Macedonians use their superior numbers to swarm around Lee's hardcore hoplites and collapse his line. Given my total cavalry superiority, I planned on doing the same this time, sweeping around the flanks to strike from behind.Dux Bellorum works so beautifully for these games: skirmishers tend to meet first, then the cavalry get involved, and only later do the bronze-clad beauties (AKA hoplites) get to grips with the situation. That is certainly what happened this time around too. Unfortunately for the good guys, the Greek peltasts failed to evaporate fast enough when faced by the Macedonian companions and the infantry lines met before my cavalry were ready.That hole in the left hand side of the Macedonian line is what happens when epilektoi hoplites meet Macedonian tribal levies... Better luck next time boys. Despite having Lee's Greeks pinned, the Macedonia

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More 10mm Macedonians - because 'finished' is never enough

With my love of early Macedonia finding an outlet through Dux Bellorum: Hoplomachia, I wanted - nay, was compelled! - to get some more 10mm Macs. Here is the new tranche of three units. These will allow me to field a full 32 points of troops in Hoplomachia, 85 points worth of troops towards a 100 point L'Art de la Guerre Early Macedonian army, or 328 points in Hail Caesar.More hetairoi! These noble Macedonian horse-barons are Magister Militum Thracian cavalry - some with head swaps to introduce a couple of helmets, some with added broad-brimmed petasoi made of green stuff. My mate Lee very unkindly refers to them as banditos...  More tribal levy! These lovely wee figures are all from the Magister Militum Greek peltasts pack. The best I can say about their performance in battle so far is that it seems historically accurate.

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Wargaming hoplite battles - just a thought

It is probably safe to say that our gaming circle has been somewhat … underwhelmed, by the off the shelf options available for wargaming hoplite battles at the moment. Although the likes of L’Art de La Guerre and distantly related DBX games can be fantastic (and we are big fans of ADG here), its scope is – I feel – a little too broad to capture a sense of hoplite battle. Seeing two long lines of evenly matched, slow moving, robust infantry units plod towards each other is not exactly thrilling. Other rule systems we have played (such as Men of Bronze) are, conversely, too dynamic. They allow extraordinarily swift movements – hoplite charges outdistance missile range and leave re-deployment so easy as to make the mini-game that is the initial of tactical deployment all but obsolete. Hail Caesar, Sword and Spear and Impetus are not every body’s cup of tea and many unit types just end up a bit vanilla after a round of combat. On the flip slide, more bespoke solutions – like the Perfect General’s Hoplomachia, can

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The lads come through (just)

The last time I led my brave boys on to the battlefield was back in May, so when Mark offered to come up from Leicester for a days wargaming I could not resist, I did warn him about the roads but it didn't phase him so yesterday was spent playing War and Conquest.There are several sets of Army Lists going about for WAC, the original Scarab lists, Gravesend lists and my own (carefully researched for my armies). Mark wanted to use the originals so no real problem for me as the one army I have not researched is the Seleucids and am happy to go with what everyone uses. The Patrician Romans are different, my own list differs in some respects, although I agree with Scarab's use of light armour for all the Roman formations as there is an historical argument for this, but I do not agree that there are no elite foot troops available the Palatini are average in this list and the bulk less so. This feeds from the fact that the Western part of the Empire was defeated hence their soldiers had to be rubbish, there were a l

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Mortal Gods – Skirmish clashes in Classical Greece

Grab you spear and shield because we're going to take a look at Footsore's Mortal Gods. Take control of a small band of 15 - 25 models and carve your place in history. In a fast paced game where you alternate actions with your opponent, do you slay your foes of focus on the scenario objectives? Either way the burning question - is it good? [...] The post Mortal Gods – Skirmish clashes in Classical Greece appeared first on Tabletop Games UK.

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Second game of Men of Bronze

After a wee cup o' tea and a chat, we sat down for our second game of Men of Bronze. Amending our units of measurements from the previous game, we agreed that 1BW = 1cm (effectively halving the distances from last time).  We were playing with the same sized forces as last time. Lee (top of the photo above) commanded the same two drilled hoplite phalanxes, two units of peltasts, and a unit of slingers, all nominally hailing from - or employed by - Corinth. My force (bottom of the photo above) was sort of similar with two units of drilled hoplites, two units of slingers and a unit of archers, all mercenaries in the pay of the  king of Lowland Macedonia.  Again, the first few turns were all about moving in the general direction of the enemy. While I tried to make use of the rough terrain on my left...... Leeandros pulled his peltasts back out of range, seeking shelter behind the phalanxes. In general, I think we both agreed that the shorter movement rates (1cm BWs) meant that the units s

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First game of Men of Bronze

This week we were able to get a couple of games in of Eric Farrington's (EF) new Men of Bronze rules, published by Osprey. Both Lee an I have been building up 10mm forces with this game foremost in our minds, so it was great to be able to get our wee chaps on the table for a run through. The rules are written to be scale and basing agnostic - a big tick in my book - but it seems pretty clear that they don't seem to have been extensively tested with anything other than units composed of multiple singly based figures. The numbers just doesn't always stack up. Distances are measured in base widths (BW), which works fine if your phalanx is composed of ten hoplites on 1 inch bases. If the unit moved 6BW, obviously that is a move of 6 inches. However, that doesn't translate for multi-based units like ours (on 60x40mm bases). At this scale, you don't want a standard move by heavy infantry to cover 36cm (6BW of 60mm)! Now, EF does allow that BW don't need to be base widths, but can be any unit of distance agree

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Sunday (Second Day)

Early doors again for our last day, due to the lousy state of Britain's roads and the M6 motorway in particular I decided to only have one game on the Sunday so that Mark and Mike could get home at a decent time, yes, that's where we are today, just wait till the lights start to go out as well, but I digress. It was Carolingians vs Normans for Stewart and Mark and a Roman clash between Mike's Legion and the Thunderbolts under my command now. I was looking forward to this as I have not led the Twelfth for some time now.Once deployed I thought Mike's centre looked weak, it consisted of auxiliary troops, archers and infantry, the large archer units could cause a problem but once engaged they should fall to proper legionary's. I would use my Lanciari to threaten his right and hold back my left where he had put some of his legionary cohorts, hopefully this would not fall until I had knocked out the centre. Mike's idea was obviously to fall on my left and roll up the line.Right from the start "there is something wr

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Saturday (First Day)

 The small War and Conquest weekend I had planned started with the arrival of Stewart for a bite to eat at about 0800, then Mike and Mark from the Leicester area at 0900 replete from a Premier Inn breakfast. Introductions were made and we got right into the swing of things, Stewart and Mike had a Roman clash (Stewart out of his depth commanding the Twelfth) while I faced off against Mark's Normans with my Patrician Romans. I have fought Normans a few times and have never beaten them, in fact I was pulverised on both occasions so I approached this game with some trepidation, my infantry were outclassed by the enemy, apart from one unit of Auxilia Palitina, however my cavalry were very good. Let battle commence.I decided to attack on my left and hold back my right until I had sorted out the Norman flanking force, hopefully by shooting them to death, meanwhile if I could get near the massed archers I should be able to beat them in hand to hand combat. Things went well if slowly on my left, Mark's skirmisher

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Review of Osprey's Men of Bronze

I was really excited to get my copy of Men of Bronze by Eric Farrington (EF) yesterday, on the day of release. These are small scale battle rules for hoplite warfare in the Archaic and Classical periods. I love rules designated for specific periods as they tend to bring a lot more flavour to the games. I was excited by these rules given the period in question – essentially, these rules allow players to field relatively small armies (five to eight units in a recommended game) to resolve differences between Greek poleis and their neighbours. Indeed, I started a new 10mm Classical project in anticipation.However, this is a bit of a tricky review for me to write as I am both a wargamer, and a classicist; a game designer and an academic. Overwhelmingly I find myself appreciating the very neat game mechanics that EF has brought to the table, but I’m also distracted by my beardiness.Lets get those distracting niggles out of the way first… Some of the grammar is rather clumsy and the manuscript would have benefited f

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10mm Early Macedonians (c.650-359 BC) completed

I have, for now at least, completed my 10mm Early Macedonians. I was prompted by the forthcoming Men of Bronze to finally build a small force of pre-Philippic reform Macedonians - and army I always wanted but never got around to. MoB only uses a small number of units (4-6ish), but in order to have a range of options, I ended up with 10. By adding two commanders, I was able to make up a 250 point army for Hail Caesar as well - perfect for multiplayer games.  Macedonian 'fast' division consisting of hetairoi cavalry, peltasts and archers. Macedonian 'heavy' division made up of the hoplites, Illyrians and slingers. I've previously posted a range of photos and details of the different units. For more information, click on the links: Hetairoi cavalryHoplites (and also here)PeltastsSlingersArchersIllyrians (and also here)ComandersBreaking the army down into Men of Bronze forces, I am guestimating that I could run a large Macedonian army, or reasonably field two smaller forces. Arg

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10mm Greco-Macedonian archers and commanders

To finish off my small 10mm Classical Macedonian project I have done up one unit of psiloi archers. Much like the Macedonian slingers, there are no literary references that I can think of which mention Macedonian archers. However, as noted with slingers, there is ample archaeological evidence that they were used extensively by Philip II (at Olynthos for example), and it is clear that Alexander the Great also made use of indigenous archers as well as their more famous Cretan colleagues (for example, Arrian Anabasis 2.9.2, 3.12). As with most of this army, the archers are from Magister Militum.The army has been built for the forthcoming Osprey game, Men of Bronze. However, in order to field the force - now ten units strong - as a small Hail Caesar army (a mighty 245 points no less!), I needed a couple of commanders. These two are standard Magister Militum figures - spares from my cavalry and hoplite units - with head swaps. They fit the bill well and will do if needed.When I get a chance I will take p

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10mm Illyrians - the result

Following on with my quest for 10mm Illyrians, here is the result. A warband of Illyrians to support - or assault - my Classical Macedonians. Taking advantage of my birthday present - now I can hobby and be part of the family at the same time (thank you lovely family) - I decided that I would milliput over the belts on the Celtiberian bodies. I do find it a strange look - a chiton or tunic without a belt. But apparently it really was the style of the time.I decided to stick with bright and bold colours. This is partly rationalised by the thought that, as mercenaries, these likely lads might have liked to show off their wealth with a bit of brightly coloured cloth. Also, it'll help to further distinguish them from the Macedonian peltasts who are principally in brow and grey.

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