Cold War


Review Book - Red Armour an Examination of the Soviet Mobile Force Concept, R Simpkin, 1984

So this was the summer reading, all part of a project called Deep Battle that I have yet to really start writing about or indeed executing but have been researching since about 2015. Over a wet week in Wales I have been ploughing my way through the 12 essays in this book by Brigadier Richard Simpkin who wrote a series of books on military manoeuvre warfare theory in the mid to late 80s and participated in the wide ranging discussion that went on at that time within NATO with regard to managing the Soviet threat.  Of the essays I am interested in I have now read most of them 2-3 times.  The ideas are complex and Simpkin is rarely an easy read.  Working at it in order to understand what he is saying can be very rewarding. Red Armour, an examination of the Soviet Mobile Force concepts does pretty much what it says on the tin in that it provides, in its 12 essays, a thought provoking and revealing analysis of Soviet Operational doctrine.  Unlike the Race to the Swift which looks at a vari

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Tanker's Tuesday - The Big Guns of War

Artillery has been a primary weapon of war since before the Napoleonic Era. Several countries have developed and built artillery systems, while artillery itself has been continually improved and redesigned to meet the evolving needs of the battlefield. This has led to a multitude of different types and designs which have played a role in the history of warfare and continue to be a significant factor in modern combat.

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Battlefield Detectives - Israel's Six Day Part 1

At 7:45 a.m. on June 5, 1967, Israel launched the most successful preemptive air strike in military history. Within a few hours, virtually the entire Egyptian Air Force lay in smoldering wreckage. Fighting on three fronts, against the combined might of five different armies, Israel secured a stunning victory in a mere six days. How did this tiny state manage to overcome an Arab enemy that had twice as many soldiers, three times as many tanks, and four times as many airplanes? With firsthand testimony from combatants and military planners plus access to key figures in the intelligence world, we gain insight into the meticulous preparations that the Israeli military undertook in the 1960s. Field-testing of key Israeli weapons and analysis of battlefield strategy on both sides show how this extraordinary victory was achieved.

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