#Discovery


3D Printing is impacting wargaming…

I admit, I’m an easy guy to impress with the “new hawtness”.  Marketing types call my kind of brain an “early adapter”.   This trend is somewhat dampened by the realities of cost and space to put stuff, but I follow technology developments avidly and sometimes wonder how new tech would impact my other big hobby, playing and painting with toy soldiers. 2mm 3D Printed Miniatures from Forward March Miniatures Now, 3D printing isn’t exactly new anymore nor is it unique and new to miniatures gaming. I’ve been buying onesie and twosie pieces off of Shapeways for a few years now.. not anything drastic because the price point still isn’t there yet– and won’t be until production costs can somehow go down. What’s unique, and for as much as I can tell, new, is the effort that Forward March Miniatures is engaged in. They are producing, at a very small (2mm) scale, the ability to create a 1:1 army for games set in the Age of Gunpowder and Steel (roughly, fr

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Starting the Cruel Seas project

Whaaat?  Another Period?  Another Fixation??  I admit it.  Behold part of my Christmas present for 2018.  The big differences between this and other fixations I have written about on this blog are 1) I didn’t drift into this.  As soon as Warlord Games announced Cruel Seas in late Summer 2018, I made an informed decision that “Yeah, I’m going to get into that”.. and the more I learned about it, the more I wanted in.  2) I’m not replacing anything.  Mad Maximillian 1934 is moving forward, and I’m going to be running a game at ScrumCon next month.  and finally 3) This isn’t unprecedented.  I love naval games, although very rarely any set in WW2 or later.  There’s a reason for this.  We’ll get into that. Cruel Seas is set in WW2, both theaters.  It is a small, skirmish level (!) game that loosely simulates the fast, chaotic naval combat of WW2 using small coastal forces.  I knew that this focus on small force size, fast combat would make for rapid, fun inten

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A Raging Weiner in the Aftermath

You can’t say I’m not Johnny on the spot when it comes to trends.  GASLANDS (the Osprey car combat wargame in the blue series) has been out for what, like a year now?  I just got around to playing it for the first time last Saturday, despite it being this year’s new hawtness…  GASLANDS has caught on with many communities and has an appeal across age groups and with non-traditional gamers.  I think the appeal is in the easy mechanics and the artisan element with the vehicles.  Everyone seems to be in to converting Matchbox and Hot Wheels cars into Post-Apocalyptic death machines.  Some of them are pretty outrageous.  The thing about kitbashing post-apoc vehicles is it’s habit forming.  I should know, I have about 60 of them.. more than I’ll ever need, but that was for another game.  So when John put the word out for post-apocalyptic death rides, I maybe had a few. The Raging Weiner enters into the fray versus John’s Mon

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Icons of Pulp Fantasy Kickstarter

I have been remiss.  Joe Procopio, host of the Second Saturday Scrum Club, has started a small company for the production of (I presume mostly) fantasy pulp miniatures, inspired by the pulp fantasy he clearly enjoys reading (and playing).  The company is ABOVE THE FRAY MINIATURES, and they have just produced their first line of pulp fantasy figures, here. Here is the first set, followed by Joe’s blurb: The Barbarian, The Hyrcanian, The Thief, The Wizard, The Harbinger of Doom, High Priest of Set, Grimhammer, and The Cannibal. Bygone Days of High Adventure  Icons of Pulp Fantasy Kickstarter, Above the Fray Miniatures Above the Fray Miniatures produces small-batch casts of pulp-era inspired sword & sorcery miniatures as homages to the types of heroes and villains found in the works of writers such as Edgar Rice Burroughs, Fritz Leiber, H.P. Lovecraft, R.E. Howard, Clark Ashton Smith, and others.  We’re commissioning the types of miniatures we want to see on our own gaming tables and are lau

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