Flintloque


Olde Nosey - part four

Another quick update, this time showing how I have painted the huge bicorne and its decoration. The base colour was a very dark grey (I don't like using pure black) with mid grey highlights and dark washes. the detailing was layered-up - base, mid highlight, then highlight before taking these images.I also took this opportunity to tidy-up the facial details (and add off-white eye detail) as well as basecoating the boots.More to follow.Tony

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Olde Nosey - part three

The first areas of real colour were the flesh areas of the face and hands. The base was a Snakebite Leather or Barbarian Leather colour (self mixed as my supplies of GW's Snakebite Leather are well gone) with highlights from the same colour with added cream or ivory craft paints. Once the area had been painted I sealed them with some Galleria Matt Varnish before adding a couple of flesh washes.Prior to this image being taken, I had added a couple of small dots of lighter flesh to the end of the nose, the tips of the fingers and the knuckle joints. I have also tidied up the black areas something that I don't regularly do, but for this tutorial or on-line build, I thought it was worth it.Earlier posts can be found here and here.Tony

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Olde Nosey for Flintloque

It has been some time since I featured an On-Line Build thread- so here is my latest customised Flintloque figure. Olde Nosey.The metal miniature is a mix of two figures; Olde Nosey from the Flintloque boxed set Sharkes Victory (5004) and the Officer figure from The Orc Guard Infantry set (54510).The Guard officer was cut with a jewellers saw from his right shoulder to the left waist while Olde Nosey had the same surgery. The two pieces were pinned and joined before the gaps were filled and detailed with green stuff. I have added some additional buttons and cuffs, but the conversion was quite simple to do and gives a unique looking character model.As usual I have mounted the figure onto a 2p coin and built up the groundwork with Milliput before adding some sieved sand over PVA glue. I prefer basing my miniatures in this way for three reasons, Firstly; it gives the figure some weight, some added bulk.Secondly; I find it much easier to hold when based.Thirdly; I don't like to base my mini's after they are paint

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The Foul Singing Bone - An All Hallow's Eve Special

It has become something of a tradition for me to write a short story for Halloween and have it published on Orcs in the Webbe, this year is no exception.The Foul Singing Bone tells of three Ferach Officers and their fight for the hand in marriage of the Generals Daughter. Full details can be found on Craig Andrews' Orcs in the Webbe or by following this link.Previous Halloween stories include;The Cursed SnuffboxDead Birds Don't lieThe Lady Canrig BwtThe Mortuary StructureHappy Halloween.Tony

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How to Build a Small Witchlands Tomb - another 'lost' article from 2012

The Small Witchlands Tomb First published on Barking Irons Online back in 2012.Another Masterclass tutorial that was 'lost' when Barking Irons Online closed down. This model was constructed at the same time as the large Tomb (see below - which also features in Dampfpanzerwagon Guide No. 3 - Models For Wargamers - for details of how to order a copy see links to the right) and was intended as an addition to my existing graveyard scenery collection. IntroductionThe smaller square tomb uses the same materials – scraps of blue foam, glued into a cube shape and sanded square as the larger one shown above.  Once again the door is made from textured lollipop sticks stuck to thin card before being glued into the doorway with a hot glue gun.The first step was to carve and texture the stonework.  I first cut shallow horizontal lines around the building. I varied the height to give same interest then cut small vertical cuts with a scalpel to simulate the rough stone blocks.The cuts were open

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Graveyard Headstones - A Flintloque Terrain Masterclass from 2012

Graveyard HeadstonesFirst published in 2012Another Terrain Masterclass from the old Barking Irons Online web pages which were lost when the BIO site closed down. It is reproduced here in full.IntroductionIn previous Masterclasses I have detailed how I built and painted various pieces of ‘scratch-built’ terrain. This weekend after a busy couple of days in work, I just wanted some fun. A simple modelling project that was't going to tax me. Searching through my ‘bits box’ I came across some white metal castings of headstones that I had purchased last year. The models were sold with plastic bases and cost no more that £2.00 for the whole set. I had bought them to build a larger graveyard, maybe even a themed terrain board, but as with many modelling projects – the impedes had disappeared and the models were now doomed to be scrap metal. That is until I decided to base and paint them.ConstructionOriginally there were thirteen pieces (plus bases) but I have already cannibalised one model and the others were destine

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The Knights' Tomb a Masterclass Article from 2012

The Knights' Tomb by Tony HarwoodFirst Published in 2012Originally published on Barking Irons Online back in July 2012, this article had since been lost when BIO was shut down but I have included it here in full.Following on from the earlier Modelling Masterclass, I was thinking about how I could model some more graveyard structures and came across some coarse, semi-flat 30mm/35mm metal castings that were given to me some years ago. The souvenir or Toy Figurines come from Prague and are of a mounted knight on horseback and two duelling knights on foot.  I decided to build a simple box tomb and place the two fighting soldiers on top.The main structure is built up from a couple of wooden blocks and clad in cardboard.  I used PVA glue to attach the card and cut the decorative panels out with a new scalpel. The technique is quite easy – if time consuming.  I cut out a number of simple rectangular shapes, each overlapping the earlier one and with a slight

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Building The Knights' Tomb a Masterclass Article from 2012

The Knights' Tomb by Tony HarwoodFirst Published in 2012Originally published on Barking Irons Online back in July 2012, this article had been lost when BIO was shut down but I have included it here in full.IntroductionFollowing on from the earlier Modelling Masterclass, I was thinking about how I could model some more graveyard structures and came across some coarse, semi-flat 30mm/35mm metal castings that were given to me some years ago. The souvenir or Toy Figurines come from Prague and are of a mounted knight on horseback and two duelling knights on foot. I decided to build a simple box tomb and place the two fighting soldiers on top.ConstructionThe main structure is built up from a couple of wooden blocks and clad with cardboard. I cut the card panels with a new scalpel blade and used PVA glue to attach them to the wooden block. The technique is quite easy – if time consuming.  I cut out a number of simple rectangular shapes, each overlapping the earlier one and with a s

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Iberian Windmill - update

This is not the first time that I have featured this particular model on the blog. For details of the earlier post see this link. However I have recently repaired the sails and thought it was worth adding these images.The model was built some years ago from DAS covered corrugated cardboard, card and balsawood with the sails modelled from skewers. I had damaged the sails and the cotton rigging after attending the West Midlands Military Show, Alumwell in March this year and thought it was time that I repaired them.The simple model is one of my all-time favourite scratch-built terrain models, one that I am very proud of. It was inspired by an image I had found in a Portuguese tourism guide picked up at a local travel agents and although simple in design and construction I think the model is just perfect for showing how I build and paint my terrain pieces.Unfortunately, I do not have any work-in-progress shots to show how it was built and painted.Tony

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Charlie Grey - RIP

Earlier this week I was told of the passing of a long-term family friend. Charles or as I have always known him Charlie. Some time ago I had written a Flintloque inspired short-story called 'The Legend of Charlie Grey'. I think it is fitting to include the link here to honour a real character.Lots of love to all the family, particularly Tony, John and Michelle.TonyThe story can be found here.

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A Simple Wicker Fence

Simple TerrainWicker Fencing by Tony HarwoodFirst published back in 2012This short Modelling Interlude was originally included on Barking Irons Online to show how easy it is to build simple and unique wargaming terrain. These articles were lost when Barking Irons closed down, so I have included the whole tutorial here on my Blog.The impetus came when I was pushing a shopping trolley around Asda’s. As Sue filled the trolley with our usual staple of bread, milk, butter and chocolate biscuits; my eyes began to wander and I spied this pack of Plant Twist Ties. I immediately thought of using the coated wire for wattle fencing and at just 99p I thought that it was definitely worth a gamble.Back home I trimmed a piece of 3mm thick plastic card as a base and attached a strip of spare 3mm plastic card as the foundation for the wooden uprights.The wooden posts were cut from a piece of scrap wood which was picked up free from a vegetable market and which once held oranges. I first cut a 4mm strip then trimmed the edges

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