Ireland


National Museum of Ireland: 17th/18th Century exhibits

A little lead in on the late Elizabethan period with this musketeer and then the display moves on to coverthe 17th/18th century exhibits.  The section begins with a ' How would you invade Ireland?'  map with some notations on it.We them go into the period of the Confederate Wars and the Cromwellian occupation. The mannequins were particularly good.I was very taken by the simplicity of the Jacobite grenadier's uniform, particularly the very plain willie-winkie stocking cap which appears to be very practical. I think the grenadier represents a soldier at the first siege of Limerick. The colours seem to be those associated with John Bellew'a Regiment.The decorative sword is that given by King William to the ancestor of David Archer! (previously featured in an article written for Wargames Illustrtated).The secrete and swrod are of 1682 vintage. The plug bayonet is of the same vintage.The Wild Geese theme post 1714 was very strong and their was an excellent video on the battle of Fontenoy. Remember Fonte

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The National Museum of Ireland - a lovely wee surprise

The parade ground square at Collins Barracks which is an old British Army facility from the late 18th/early 19th century.I squeezed this in whilst speaking at a conference in Dublin. What a wonderful find it was. In this first post I thought I would trail the variety of fantastic and interesting militaria contained in a very substantial and well laid out national museum. I visited the Collins Barracks site on Benburb Street.Pikeman from the Confederate Wars periodThe displays were well set out and the information useful and engaging. The staff were also very helpful. There may be other displays in the other sites but this one begins the military history in the 16th Century so I didn't see anything about the earlier centuries.Jacobite Grenadier at Limerick. More of him laterThe 17th and 18th century exhibits were the most interesting to me and some of the best.The ACW section was also quite significant. Irish military history is long and rich but because Irish soliders were inviariably fighting as a contingent

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Marlborough's Danes

Yes, I know. How could Warfare have produced such an important component of the armies of the period without me getting my act together and at least letting everyone see what they look like in battalions?An unforgivable omission but as always I will trot out my 'one man team' excuse. Well, that and Ottomans, Wagonburgs, wee ships, Cossacks and the like.Anyway at last I have some units of Danes to show as I imagined them when first commissioned as sculpts. Smart uniforms, martial air, nice colour combinations - the Danes are one of those wargaming contingents which ticks every box - ubiquitous over an extended period, manageable in size, all arms present, nice uniforms and flags, a considerable amount of glory, some controversy and as I have said before.. the ain't nothing like a Dane!My main interest in the Danish contingent started with their involvement in Ireland. A reputation for professionalism and experience saw them used in the front line and frequently. Off the top of my head The Boyne, Limerick, rapp

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Did you hear the one about four Dutch Heokers? December 1689.

Eilean Dub Mor, December 4, 1689A regimental camp at Dundalk October 1689 - King William's soldier die in droves daily.William III and his army landed at Carrickfergus, Ulster in August 1689 and the international struggle for Ireland began. His army was ill-served by its officers and during the terrible winter camp at Dundalk thousands of men died from disease. The situation was disastrous and dangerous. Lack of proper supplies, poor sanitation, inadequate food and damp shelter resulted in dozens of preventable deaths every day. Something had to be done to alleviate the army's wasting away.The French Navy made passage to Ireland challenging and so convoy routes had to be kept secret. In the dead of winter a small yet important mission comprising four small Dutch heokers has navigated Cape Wrath and is weaving through the inner Hebrides to come into Dundalk harbour from the north. The ships are heavy laden and armed but without an escort. They have been told a man o'war will pick them up off Eilean Dub Mor (Th

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Against the wind - Bantry Bay May 11, 1689

This second scenario using my 1/2400 ships is based on the events of May 11, 1689 when Admiral Herbert's English fleet attacked a French fleet under Admiral Chateaurenault in Bantry Bay on the south west coast of Ireland. It also gets me back to Ireland and my favourite theatre of the entire period.The historical action was inconclusive and involved 24 French and 19 English vessels. Most were 3rd, 4th or 5th rate on both sides. I have chosen not to re fight the whole battle but to pick a representative vignette in the form of a French ship running for the open water of the Atlantic instead of being trapped in the narrow confines of the bay.The main Battle of Bantry BayThe game was set at a 20 turn limit. The larger ships featured were actually present at the battle although I have changed the names of the captains. Those familiar with American rock music of the seventies may connect the scenario title with the name of one of the captains! Bonus ball question!Scenario: Against the wind , Bantry Bay, May 11, 16

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Blood & Cutts! Part 2

The second part of my piece on Lord John Cutts of Gowran.An appraisal of England’s fire eating generalEnglish hero - for sure, Subject of Swiftian satire - definitely!What he did bestHis speciality was leading assaults into the breach. Many of his wounds were received in such situations. He seemed to gravitate towards peers and superiors with a similar disposition to his own. One such, Thomas Tollemache, a rival of John Churchill and another fire-eater, died after being hit in the groin by a cannonball during the disastrous Camaret Bay amphibious landing. Cutts himself performed insanely reckless feats there yet, lived to tell the tale.Man on the make - Cutts at 24 leading Transylvanian locals against the hated TurksBeing point-man or any man for that matter, during the storming of a breach was generally recognized as a suicide mission. It was a task normally assigned to an army’s biggest, baddest head-bangers – the grenadiers. Tooled up with flintlock muskets, bags of hand grenades, hatchets, occasionally be

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One to One wargaming - table top reality

A real life soldier! Musketeer Sean of a Jacobite regiment in Ireland circa 1689. Copyright B Hilton.Figure gaming usually falls into some broad categories in terms of scale. Firstly there is the model scale and secondly, the model to man ratio.Typically 40mm, 28/25mm, 20mm, 15mm, 10mm, 6mm are the most common categories for the former. Of course there are several intermediate scales and some excessively large and small ones however, we are talking here neither of using hair rollers to represent the Imperial Guard nor of Action Man hiding in the begonias of your back yard to ambush Combat Johnnie. Let's stay with the more common and thus majority scales.Re-enactors in a single rank with modest space between each. Copyright B.Hilton.The second scale refers to how many models represent how many men and horses. This spectrum covers at one end: one model is one man and at the other end: where one model is perhaps one hundred men.Chopping out the Glitterati style games often featured in hobby magazines and focusin

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One to one wargaming: expanding the idea

Three 48 man companies of musketeers from the garrison of Derry. A company of Mountjoy's Regt at the centre.I was very pleased that the first post on this subject was popular and that visitors were stimulated to consider the implications of frontages, deployment, fire methodologies and movement around the battlefield and its table top imitation.A battalion of Jacobite Foot based for Beneath the Lily Banners and representing between 500- 800 menTo continue, I thought it might be useful to reflect on what we are currently using as tabletop representations and the suspension of disbelief necessary to imagine it can be in any way realistic.It calls to mind innumerable conversations over the years revolving around what I call 'nippy battalion syndrome'. That is, where gamers attempt to squeeze formations of 28mm models through gaps in their lines barely 25mm wide in order to replace worn battalions with fresh ones.Or, those tedious discussions around.. "why does it take a full turn or even two turns to deploy out

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One to one wargaming: A visual study in British company deployment 1685-1698

Company six deepI have been planning this particular post for about three years. Why has it taken so long? I needed to get a run at it. I am fascinated by the compromises necessary in wargaming particularly in relation to scales. Vertical scale distortion, ground scale distortion and finally the challenges in representing the depth of formations relative to their width. This last one has always bothered me, especially when battalions were capable of expanding and contracting their frontage and, when the norm seemed to alter from six deep to three deep lines.Company six deepIn order to experiment I needed to paint a full company one to one so that I could model the different formations without compromise. I chose a typical British company of the 1680-1698 period. This could be English, Scots, Irish or Welsh. I also chose to model it with a ratio of four muskets to one pike. In between other demanding projects I painted, in a very basic format:1 Captain1 Lieutenant1 Ensign2 Sergeants3 Corporals1 Drummer48 match

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"Nollaig Shona Daoibh" or Happy Christmas from Ireland......

..........have a good one if you can, me and the missus are having a quiet one as usual ( just the two of us), she has a cold at the moment and I have the far more serious man flu! Hoping you receive and achieve what you need this year, me I hope Santa brings me some cold hard paypal to feed the metal/resin/plastic addiction we all have!                                   Of course it's a Christmas movie............or maybe this is your thing!

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