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Roof Ridges for Sarissa Mountain Village models

I wanted to personalise my Sarissa Mountain Village and make it look a bit more interesting, so I did some research on the Japanese architecture on Intertubes. Among the articles I found was this rather interesting website which has the text and pictures from a book written in 1885 by Edward S. Morse, an American professor who visited Japan in the 19th century. Entitled Japanese Homes and their Surroundings it contains a wealth of interesting information on Japanese architecture of great use to wargamers building scenery for Samurai games and which includes a section on “A Study of Roofs” I got more inspiration by doing a number of searches on Google Images using various terms related to roofs including “Japanese thatched roofs”. This research showed that there was a great variety in the ridges found on thatched houses in Japan and that the style of such ridges varied by region. I focused my search on finding a style which I could easily replicate in miniature. I found

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Mountain Village for Test of Honour– Farmhouse & Rice Store

Here’s the Mountain Village Farmhouse, built as per instructions in the packet. I went to work with the strip-wood to add some beams, this took a couple of hours, there’s a lot of them. Thatch added with scouring pads. Roof ridge scratch-built from wooden coffee stirrers and strip-wood and everything given a base coat.  Grey for the wood, brown for the thatch. Inks, dry-brushing and panels painted. Another view of the finished model. A Sarissa Rice Store.  This model didn’t really need any added beams, but I changed the tiled roof for a thatched one with scouring pads and scratch-built a roof ridge.

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Mountain Village for Test of Honour – Hovel & Animal Shelters

Another Japanese scenery kit from Sarissa Precision.  This time the Mountain Village Hovel & Animal Shelter Set.  This is how the hovel looks built as per instructions in the pack.   I also took some inspiration from  a rather good two part article article about making these buildings available on the Sarissa blog.  Part 1 covers making the thatched roofs  from scouring pads, part 2 covers using water colour brush pens to add some subtle shading effects. To personalise the building I’ve added some strip-wood to make it a bit less boxy, put bits of scouring pad on the roof, and scratch-build a roof ridge out of wooden coffee stirrers and strip-wood.  Roof ridge is glued on to the top of the roof. Base coat of gray paint on the walls and roof ridge and watered down acrylic black mixed with PVA glue on the thatch. Inks and dry-brushing.   The animal shelters were done much the same way. 

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My Sanada for Test of Honour

I’ve had all these Dixon Samurai for at least 20 years and have played various games with them.  Having discovered the Test of Honour skirmish game I took them all down from the shelf, touched them up a bit, added Sanada sashimonos and made some sabot bases.  I even ordered up a few more so that I could make two forces with all the choices needed for the basic scenarios in the Test of Honour rules.  The Sanada mons on the sashimonos were designed using Coreldraw and printed out on laser printer waterslide decal paper.    The whole force. Samurai Ashigaru with Yari   Asigaru with bow Teppo Standard bearer and musician.  Now to finish off my other force, one that I can use as allies or opponents for my Sanada. 

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Sarissa Scenery for Test of Honour – the Shrine

I’ve been having a lot of fun playing Test of Honour at the club and a few weeks back I decided I needed to invest in some scenery.   Looking around the Internet I found that Sarissa Precision do a fine range of 28mm mdf Japanese scenery that would go just fine the the Dixon Samurai I have brought out from the cupboard where they have been lurking for about 25 years.  So off went an order, Shrine, Torrii Gate,  Rice Store,  Rice Cart and one of their Mountain Village Scenery Sets. I have written before about how I don’t really  like mdf buildings built straight out of the box and painted and how I like to add texture and detail to what you get if you build things straight off the instructions.    It can take a fair amount of time and effort, but I think it’s worth it. So here’s my shrine.  I’ve added strip-wood to the walls of the building, following the pattern that Sarissa have engraved on there, and added tiles to the roof. To my mind it all looks quite a bit better than the version Sarissa show on their

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Plans for 2019

Gaming Same as I say every year At least one gaming session a weekRun Deep Fried Lard 2019 I had a few games of CoC and IABSM using my France 1940 forces instead of the normal Normandy 1944 late last year and found it all a refreshing change of pace. I’m planning more of these for 2019. Having built a load of scenery I really need to play Gaslands a bit more and I hope to play some games with my son. That will probably be fantasy or science fiction (possibly Kill Team from GW). Sharp Practice is sure to get a played few times again this year and I’ll be surprised if Too the Strongest doesn’t show up on my most played list again, despite the fact that I don’t have any figures for it. . Painting Having missed my target for 2018 I’m going to try for it again. 2,000 points in the  TooFatLardies Painting Challenge 2019.  Specific plans. 15mm Blitzkrieg CoC: I made a start on this in 2018, with core platoons for French Inf

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Review of 2018

A month late, but it’s time for me to look back on 2018 and see how I did compared to the targets I set myself at the start of the year.  It was a bad year for blogging but my painting and gaming were going great guns until September when a visit from the Black Dog got me feeling very low and not doing very much at all.  I painted nothing much at all for three months. Painting Missed my target of 2,000 points in the 2018 Too Fat Lardies Painting Challenge run by Robert Avery on his Vis Lardica blog.  With 1779 points I was 221 short. Lots of cars, motorbikes  and scenery for Gaslands early in the year, followed up with some painting and rebasing for AK47 Republic. I made on of my targets in June, when I finally got round to painting some of the French Indian Wars 15mm models I’ve had sitting in a box for about five years. The release of 1940 supplements for Chain of Command and I Ain’t Been Shot Mum from Too Fat Lardies led me to expand my forces for the period – 10mm French, Britis

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