Mana Press


Mad Maximillian 1934: I should have sparred!

As I have mentioned in this journal, I signed up to run a Mad Maximillian 1934 game at COLD WARS 2019. F: 183: 19 – JUNKWAFFEL: A Mad Maximillian 1934 Adventure – Theme Friday, 7:00 PM, 3 hrs, Players: 10, BF86 GM: Walt O’Hara Sponsor: none – Prize: none Period: Pulp – Scale: 28mm – Rules: Mad Maximillian Return to the world of fragile deadly jalopies armed with instruments of peril! Everyone KNOWS about the Apocalypse, right? The one that took place back in 1934? Junkwaffel takes place in a world that has already suffered collapse, sometime directly after WWI. Players pilottheir armed motorcycles, buggies, jalopies and junkers through a war-torn landscape, full of traps, ambushes and the greatest danger of all, the other players. Rules easy to teach, glad to have youngsters from about 13 up, younger must have a parent in attendance. I was planning on this game being a reprise of the race I ran at ScrumCon 19.   There’s an old saying that goes something like “Yo

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Two new vehicles for Mad Maximilian 1934

In preparation for COLD WARS 2019, where I’m running a Junkwaffel game Friday night, I have rolled two new vehicles out of the shop.  The Leyat Fan Dancer and the Blue Omega.  Both cars are diecast conversions, not kit cars. First, a little history.  Both diecasts are based on ancient vehicles that actually existed.  The first is the ALFA CONSTANZA 40/60 AERODINAMICA, which was designed between 1913 and 1922. I like the unique shape. At the Alfa Romeo Museum, Italy I am intrigued by the new Spar Torpedo rules that were published in an article in WSS 95, so I thought I’d build a few conversions featuring this weapon. Enter.. the Blue Omega! Blue Omega with one Torp deployed.  Figure for scale. Blue Omega with both spars in stow configuration Conversion was simple. I added a couple of brackets on either side of the Omega, and then built a large spar with a rocket shaped game piece on top for the “warhead”. Note that the WSS95 rules state only one spar per car, but I cheerfully broke this

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New Vehicles for Max 34

I know, I know.. I keep saying “That’s IT! I’m done doing vehicle conversions for Mad Maximillian 1934!“, but I have to admit, it’s fun.  The latest and greatest utilize a couple of diecast 1:43 scale vehicles from a Russian toy company that produce historical models based on their own history– in the Soviet phase.  I’ll be danged if I can remember the manufacturer (I can’t read Cyrillic), but here you go: Repurposed BA-20 Armored CarThe old Soviets were crazy about having Scout armored cars in their armored ranks, and they made ton of different kinds.  One of the earliest, and ironically, with a production year of 1934, was the BA-20.  Underpowered and thinly armored, it was only produced in limited numbers.  In common with most armored cars derived from cars, the BA-20 was largely road bound. The lack of all-wheel drive, high ground pressure and low power prevented it from moving cross-country except on very firm ground. The armor was too thin to stop anyth

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New, beefy Stalinist Vehicles for Max 34

I know, I know.. I keep saying “That’s IT! I’m done doing vehicle conversions for Mad Maximillian 1934!“, but I have to admit, it’s fun, almost a hobby in itself. The latest and greatest vehicles on the table utilize a couple of diecast 1:43 scale vehicles from a Russian toy company that produces historical models based on their own history– in the Soviet phase.  I’ll be danged if I can remember the manufacturer (I can’t read Cyrillic), but here you go: Re-purposed BA-20 Armored Car The old Soviets were crazy about having Scout armored cars in their armored ranks, and they made ton of different kinds.  One of the earliest, and ironically, with a production year of 1934, was the BA-20.  Under-powered and thinly armored, it was only produced in limited numbers.  In common with most armored cars derived from cars, the BA-20 was largely road bound. The lack of all-wheel drive, high ground pressure and low power prevented it from moving cross-country except on

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Reprise: Mad Maximilian 1934

I rarely re-blog from another journal on this blog, and as Blogger.com and WordPress.com blogs don’t talk to each other easily, I’ll just post a note pointing towards the recent post on Joe’s blog, Scrum in Miniature.  The Fun and the Fury: Mad Maximilian 1934.   This post is his short commentary on our recent Max 34 game as the September event for the Second Saturday Scrum Club.  Joe is very complimentary to the game (which I appreciate).  The game session was invaluable for me to get the ebb and flow of the mechanics with a group, so I could run it effectively at FALL IN  this year.  I posted on the event recently, myself. One item Joe pointed out that I have missed the entire time.  Eureka calls this game MAD Maximilian 1934 on their shelf displays in their booth at shows.  They use the term on their website.  It’s a cool name. Joe points out the rule book is called, simply “Maximillian 1934“.  I  honestly had never noticed it.  I’m kind of surprised Mana Press fel

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