Modeling


Swedish Force from the new BLB3 GNW supplement

Onwards to Vlasivka 1709Trailing the Building your Force section of the new GNW Supplement to Beneath the Lily Banners 3rd Edition, here is the Swedish Force which fights in the example game Vlasivka 1709. The battle is a dramatic walk through the rule amendments for the Swedish army and the game was an extremely close run affair. Shots from the action are included in this post.The Swedes are expensive using the points system and this is the force which arrives in dribs and drabs on the table to overcome a Russian force almost twice its size on the road to Poltava.25 points of Swedish table top powerSwedish Force circa 17091 Veteran-Elite ‘Pike & Shot ’battalion with flintlock muskets, Swedish @ 3.5 points   3.5 points2 Drilled ‘Pike & Shot’ battalions with flintlock muskets, Swedish each @ 2 points       2 points3 Veteran squadrons of ‘Blade’ Horse, Swedish, each @ 3 points               &nbs

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As it should be. Swedish GNW Cavalry

Charge! The Swedish Liv Dragoon Regiment thunders down upon its quaking enemiesIt's a legitimate question. Why has it taken you so long to produce a unit of your own cavalry, based in your own 'chevron' style?Time and conflicting priorities is the answer. I don't have enough of the former and an abundance of the latter.Squadron 1 full charge in chevronI did paint about eighteen riders but only three or four horses. That enabled me to get the web shop stocked but a long way off a 'game ready' unit.Squadron 1 - the chevron is more obvious from this angleSince these chaps emerge about a year ago we've released about another 140 models many of which required painting. We done several show, travelled hundreds of gaming miles and I have been working on several publications and articles. Not excuses, just facts.Squadron 1 rear viewNevertheless, the rapid progress on the new GNW supplement inspired me to get some of these chaps table ready and photographed. I painted around seventeen horses and an additional three ri

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Focusing on Sedgemoor Part 3: The Rebel Army

A few militia style clothes may have been the most uniformed anyone got in Monmouth's ArmyTo describe the rebel forces as an army is probably being somewhat overgenerous. Several of the officer cadre including the Duke himself were soldiers, brave, proven and with battle experience gained in formal, continental wars. There were undoubtedly ex soldiers, deserters from the army, militiamen and mercenaries forming a portion of the regiments however, the majority of the men were volunteers, whipped up to rebel against something - the King, Popery, oppression and the usual causes trotted out to get the masses mobilized by their political lords and masters.Not everyone came out for King Monmouth. This however may be a scene from the Bloody AssizesMonmouth landed on June 11 and was executed on July 15. Even the most zealous supporter of the cause would have difficulty in arguing that the assembled volunteers could  have been moulded into an army with the necessary organization, command structure, campaign plan,

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One to One wargaming - table top reality

A real life soldier! Musketeer Sean of a Jacobite regiment in Ireland circa 1689. Copyright B Hilton.Figure gaming usually falls into some broad categories in terms of scale. Firstly there is the model scale and secondly, the model to man ratio.Typically 40mm, 28/25mm, 20mm, 15mm, 10mm, 6mm are the most common categories for the former. Of course there are several intermediate scales and some excessively large and small ones however, we are talking here neither of using hair rollers to represent the Imperial Guard nor of Action Man hiding in the begonias of your back yard to ambush Combat Johnnie. Let's stay with the more common and thus majority scales.Re-enactors in a single rank with modest space between each. Copyright B.Hilton.The second scale refers to how many models represent how many men and horses. This spectrum covers at one end: one model is one man and at the other end: where one model is perhaps one hundred men.Chopping out the Glitterati style games often featured in hobby magazines and focusin

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One to one wargaming: expanding the idea

Three 48 man companies of musketeers from the garrison of Derry. A company of Mountjoy's Regt at the centre.I was very pleased that the first post on this subject was popular and that visitors were stimulated to consider the implications of frontages, deployment, fire methodologies and movement around the battlefield and its table top imitation.A battalion of Jacobite Foot based for Beneath the Lily Banners and representing between 500- 800 menTo continue, I thought it might be useful to reflect on what we are currently using as tabletop representations and the suspension of disbelief necessary to imagine it can be in any way realistic.It calls to mind innumerable conversations over the years revolving around what I call 'nippy battalion syndrome'. That is, where gamers attempt to squeeze formations of 28mm models through gaps in their lines barely 25mm wide in order to replace worn battalions with fresh ones.Or, those tedious discussions around.. "why does it take a full turn or even two turns to deploy out

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One to one wargaming: A visual study in British company deployment 1685-1698

Company six deepI have been planning this particular post for about three years. Why has it taken so long? I needed to get a run at it. I am fascinated by the compromises necessary in wargaming particularly in relation to scales. Vertical scale distortion, ground scale distortion and finally the challenges in representing the depth of formations relative to their width. This last one has always bothered me, especially when battalions were capable of expanding and contracting their frontage and, when the norm seemed to alter from six deep to three deep lines.Company six deepIn order to experiment I needed to paint a full company one to one so that I could model the different formations without compromise. I chose a typical British company of the 1680-1698 period. This could be English, Scots, Irish or Welsh. I also chose to model it with a ratio of four muskets to one pike. In between other demanding projects I painted, in a very basic format:1 Captain1 Lieutenant1 Ensign2 Sergeants3 Corporals1 Drummer48 match

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Railless Interceptors Spotted: Mistakes Were Made

I preordered a Crucible Guard Railless Interceptor and on a whim bought the second one that was on the shelf at the FLGS. The title of this post refers to mistakes, but those weren't the ones I was thinking of.No, the mistakes were in the casting. Left and right you can how the trucks of the Railless are warped away from the body, so much so that the wheels kind of splay out. It would have taken some hair dryer time to fix, but I am an impatient man and went ahead and glued them together.One of the sides of the trucks was even cracked in the box, but I glued it down anyway as it was easier to set in place that way. As longer thinner pieces, they aren't really good candidates for resin casting.I know privateer press would have advised me on how to fix the bent parts and replaced the broken ones, but so long as everything can come together and get painted up without falling apart, I'm pretty happy with how they will look. Progress pics of the first railless I'm painting should be up in the next week.So I guess

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Dan Booh's Trollkin Airship

Trollbloods facebook group user Dan Booh has been posting updates of his scratch built Trollkin Battle Engine, an airship in the style of Final Fantasy. I think he's got two of these, and the results are amazing.At this point I don't think anyone would argue about which Troll battle engine this is supposed to represent because the answer is clearly "Yes, this is a Trollkin battle engine." I would kill to have actual rules for this thing but I'll settle for War Hooch Hauler Wagon. I'd argue that the pilot's scarf qualifies him as Northkin.Anyway, this thing is lovely. I kinda want to do one of my own.I think he's currently posting either progress pics in the faebook group or building a whole new one with progress pics. I'm considering building alongside Dan Booh's posts this time around.

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Arms Delivery

"'tis nobler in the mind to suffer The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, Or to take arms against a sea of troubles, And by opposing end them?" - Hamlet My arms came in the mail! I can now build that second unit of Crucible Guard Infantry that I've always wanted!Let me explain.The resin 10 man unit kits put out by Privateer Press typically have four sculpts. A unit leader, and three copies of three different poses. In the case of units that also include an attachment, you have the extra sculpts of the Officer and Standard Bearer (or in the case of the Crucible Guard Infantry, the giant bottle of juice or symbol of that juice).These are generally cast on two sprues in resin. There are three copies of one sprue which has the three poses of infantrymen, and there's one copy of the last sprue which has the unit leader, officer, and whatever extra dude is in the box.These bodies are sometimes built to be attached by various arm layouts cast in metal. In the case of the Crucible

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Janissary Ortas 1530 - 1720

Janissary dress and equipment changed little from the mid 16th to the mid 18th century. The units featured here could easily be from The First Battle of Mohacs in 1526, part of the all conquering armies of the 1500s or, from the forces who fought at the Relief of Vienna 1683,  Second Battle of Mohacs 1687, Battle of Zenta 1697 and Pruth River Campaign 1710-1711 . Most of the work was done as a commission by Rob Goodyear. I have based each unit and flagged them. What I like about the way these have been painted by Rob is the interesting mix of colours he has used in each Orta. I used the blend of colours as the inspiration for the banners I did for each. The Orta above mixed blue, green, a soft ochre-green and red pink. This suggested to me that a large, bold and simple green and yellow banner would suit well.The orange which features prominently in the Orta above together with a chocolately - wine shade inspired a very bold flag with arabic writing. I choose a five layered orange field with a c

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Ottoman Commanders

I have always enjoyed building Command vignettes. These three are the very first and utilize models from packs OT01, OT05 and OT06. The rank of the officers is non specific although two hve standards whilst the central base features two full dress Janissaries - a senior officer and his bodyguard.I don't often use purple in my warming units but fancied doing a small personal banner for this senior officer. The base also features an interesting section of dead tree - bleached and burned by the searing south eastern European sun.Traditional Janissary symbol of the two tongued sword on this personal standard of yet another senior officer. The rocks are toned down with a sepia wash.This colourful senior officer has an equally colourful bodyguard Janissary at his side. The base is smaller than the other two featured here.A couple of shots at slightly different angles and orientations. Ottomans certainly draw you away from traditional palette colours.Soon we'll be previewing 10 new Ottoman Command models which are v

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Ottoman Banners - Table top bling bling!

Part of one of my own painted unitsWell, this is somewhat of a bling post but I just enjoyed myself so much doing these flags that I thought I would share. I decided that any Ottoman unit I got the chance to  paint and/or base was going to get one of my old style linen flags.The Terry's Chocolate Orange Orta - The men listen intently to their Bolouk!Once I started it was hard to stop! Sometimes its a bit messy but in the end the results justify the effort. I have made and painted probably 250 to 300 of these since 1986 when I first developed the technique. It has changed a bit since then but fundamentally its the same labour intensive process.Bold and striking colours set off the Janissary OrtasI know a few people have tried to industrialize/commercialize it since then but I always felt there was something missing from these. Printing directly onto material does not work and any flags of that sort I have chanced upon seem a bit insipid and lifeless.A very commonly used symbol in the Ottoman Army - 

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Release of Janissary Battalion packs

We are delighted to announce the release of three Janissary Battalion packs each containing 20 models;OTB01 Janissary Orta in full dress advancingOTB02 Janissary Orta in full dress standingOTB03 Janissary Orta in campaign dress - firing lineTwo stands (12 models) from OTB03The fine examples above were painted by Rob Goodyear with flags by BH.Each Orta (Battalion) retails at £31.00 ex shipping and we'll have some in Antwerp at CRISIS 2018

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Story of a show-game 1 - the trade off

LoA North American Chapter - Clarence did ALL the work for this one at Historicon 2016Being a Team of two, you have to make decisions which are inevitably a compromise. I have captained some productive groups since starting on the Event Trail around 1992. Sometimes we were two, occasionally three, many times and for several years, I flew solo.Don't be 'leg-ist' please!I don't envy larger groups but they do offer a division (rarely equal) of labour and the opportunity to game-explain-shop-rest-travel in a proportion, permitting all the bases to be covered and preventing burn out.Epics of this nature are hard yards for a two man team. Great to see but very challenging from a logistics perspective.This is often forgotten when comments such as 'well nothing seems to move on that table', 'it's just a static display', 'why didn't they engage with the public?' etc are bandied. Not a complaint I hasten to add and of no matter to the punter, but significant as an influencing factor nonetheless. You can't do it all esp

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