Narrow Gauge


An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Wooden Fence part two

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In these latest posts I will update the Blog with 'work-in-progress' images and text showing how the initial project is developing. For more information look out for the Narrow Gauge Labels to the right.The wooden fence was glued in place with superglue and I started placing bits and pieces of 'clutter'. At first I was just testing where I wanted the items to go, but then I started to glue them in place and add some weathering powders to the join between items and ground cover.The process took some time, but was great fun and as you can see I have used lots of items of clutter to fill this side of the layout.Most of these items were scratch-built or high

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An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Wooden fence

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In these latest posts I will update the Blog with 'work-in-progress' images and text showing how the initial project is developing. For more information look out for the Narrow Gauge Labels to the right.This latest update shows how I modelled the wooden fence that will be fitted to the right hand side of the warehouse (see illustration above and ignore the X).The fence was built from craft lollipop sticks which had been  painted yellow. I first soaked them in a tub of white wine vinegar to remove most of the paint before adding texture with some rough sandpaper and a wire brush. I trimmed the fence panels to size (remembering to add some variety and

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Another Book

Sue bought me this book earlier in the week. It is another charity shop purchase, bought for under £5.00 and features images of a number of 15'' gauge railways. The bonus is that is is signed by both David Mosley and Peter van Zeller.Fifteen Inch Gauge Railways - Their History, Equipment and Operation written by David Mosley and Peter van ZellerPublished by David & Charles in 198696 pages with loads of black and white imagesISBN 0-7153-8694-8List price - £9.95Thank you Sue.Tony

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An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Ground cover

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In these latest posts I will update the Blog with 'work-in-progress' images and text showing how the initial project is developing. For more information look out for the Narrow Gauge Labels to the right.The main ground cover areas have now been painted and textured. After building up the surface with DAS modelling clay and then sanding it smooth, I added some light texture from fine sand which was glued in place with a mixture of PVA glue and Matt Medium. Later I painted the ground cover with various acrylic paints applied in light washes with some opaque areas 'splodged' in.The concrete wall section to the left (see this post for more details)

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An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding detail

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In these latest posts I will update the Blog with 'work-in-progress' images and text showing how the initial project is developing. For more information look out for the Narrow Gauge Labels to the right.The first items of clutter added to the layout were the large oil storage container and some greenery modelled from artificial hanging basket material as seen in the image below while the image above was me placing items to see how they interacted with one another. I had great fun moving items around until I had found what I thought was the perfect position.The low wall (in the centre) has been glued in place with a corrugated cardboard spacer to move it

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An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Modifying the track layout part two

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In these latest posts I will update the Blog with 'work-in-progress' images and text showing how the initial project is developing. For more information look out for the Narrow Gauge Labels to the right.The original 'Y' Shaped track layout has been pulled-up and replaced with a single length of Peco SL - 500 'Crazy Track' or O-16.5 track fitted slightly further back from the wharf than in the initial design. I have removed about one in three sleepers for a more in keeping sleeper spacing and glued the track down with PVA glue.I have used card and DAS modelling clay to level out the groundwork to either side of the track and small pieces of cork to fill-i

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An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Modifying the track layout

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In these latest posts I will update the Blog with 'work-in-progress' images and text showing how the initial project is developing. For more information look out for the Narrow Gauge Labels to the right.It's been some time since I posted updates on the OSO SALT layout. I had allowed the whole project to stagnate due to some work and commission issues but hopefully the visit to the 7mm Narrow Gauge Association Railway Show earlier this month will give me the push to continue working on the layout.I have decided that the 'Y' style layout will have to go as the area in front of the main building (particularly in front of the factory door) does not allow for

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Narrow Gauge & Industrial Railway Modelling Review #80

A third post detailing a six page treatise on painting and colouring wood found in the specialist railway magazine Narrow Gauge & Industrial Railway Modelling Review. This time issue 80 from October 2009.The article called Working with Wood was written by James Coldicott and shows materials and techniques for finishing scale timber for model making. The article covers; Materials and Tools, Timber Preparation, Solvents, Graining and even a step-by-step walk-through showing how to model aged wood in miniature. Another great read.As with the two earlier posts - I would recommend searching out this not-too-common magazine series and checking out the very informative model making articles.Tony

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Narrow Gauge & Industrial Railway Modelling Review #96

This is another Blog entry highlighting an article in the specialist narrow gauge railway magazine Narrow Gauge & Industrial Railway Modelling Review that I picked up second-hand at the recent 7mm Narrow gauge show in Burton this weekend.Issue 96 from October 2013 has a 6 page article called Weathering a Sentinel written by Tim Shackleton that details the use of MIG weathering powders and other weathering techniques on a 7mm scale white metal and brass 80hp Sentinel built from the Wrightlines kit.Once again a beautifully written and illustrated tutorial with loads of hints and tips for realistic weathering and finishing that I have enjoyed reading. This is not a common magazine but it is well worth searching out as the techniques are very informative.Tony

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Narrow Gauge & Industrial Railway Modelling Review #86

As regular readers and followers will know, I like to browse and purchase second-hand model making magazines, picking them up from charity shops or second-hand at shows. At the recent 7mm Narrow Gauge Railway Show in Burton I picked up a couple of second-hand issues of the specialist model making magazine Narrow Gauge & Industrial Railway Modelling Review and in particular number 86 from April 2011.The magazine has a 10 page spread by Simon Harris called Modelling and painting in the larger scales. This has to be one of the most informative model making articles I have ever read (and re-read) and is full of hints and tips for painting realistic metal and wooden subjects with some innovative and unusual materials and techniques.The magazine is not generally available but I would thoroughly recommend searching it out and in particular getting hold of this tutorial as the techniques used will be of interest to modellers everywhere. It really is that good.These are just three of the many illustrations of

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A Recent Charity Shop Find - what should I do?

I recently picked up this beautifully illustrated, soft-bound book at a local charity store for just £1.00. My intention was to use the coloured images as enamel signs on my 1:27.7 scale, narrow gauge railway layout but after doing some research I'm now wondering if I should keep the book intact.BackgroundRegular readers will know that I have been working on a narrow gauge railway layout - a shelf layout featuring scratch-built buildings and structures constructed to the rather unusual scale of 1:27.7 or 11mm = 1 foot. For more information check out this label.The mathsNormal HO-OO model railway track has a gauge (the distance between the tracks) of 16.5mm. Divide this by 18 inches (a recognised although rare gauge for industrial and military railways) and you get 11mm to the foot or 1:27.7 scale. In this scale (11mm to the foot) a normal height man would be between 63mm and 65mm tall. Not a common scale - hence all the scratch building.Enamel signs for decorationThe book has many colour (and some black

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Painting Rust Tutorial

As promised, today I will show how I paint rust effects on plastic. Step OneI chose a couple of plain plastic pieces. The white plastic bracket is from a small paint pot tester rack that I picked up from a scrap resources centre in Worceter for free. While the yellow/grey roller is a spare part from a label printer that had just been replaced and was going to be thrown away.Step TwoBoth pieces have been cleaned up and in the case of the white moulding, I have added a couple of plastic tube brackets or hole extensions which were glued in place with superglue.I have roughed up the plastic with some sanding sticks prior to applying paint.Step ThreeI produced this colour chart to show the main colours used. They are;1 - Charred Brown 72.045 Vallejo Game Color2 - 50/50 mix Charred Brown/ Orange Fire3 - Orange Fire 72.008 (Note - I usually use Hot Orange 72.009 but on this occasion I had run out)4 - Rusty Patina a textured craft paint that I have been experimenting with. I find that the texturing is a little t

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An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twenty-seven

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.The strangely shaped oil can to the rear right was copied from a similar can seen at the Bewdley Town Museum earlier this year. I was not able to get close enough to measure it, so I have estimated the size and I think I may have made it a little too big. It was made by gluing layers of 3mm thick plastic card together and wrapping with aluminium foil. The handle was more foil and the spout was a shor

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An Industrial Narrow Gauge Adventure - Adding Clutter part twenty-six

Regular followers of this Blog will know that I have been working on an industrial narrow gauge railway layout built to 1:27.7 scale or 11mm = 1 foot. The choice of such an unusual scale has meant that much if not all items needed for the layout have had to be heavily modified and/or converted from existing models, completely 'scratch built' or sculpted by me.In a series of clutter themed posts which are planned to run throughout August I will demonstrate what materials I have used to model such items and how I have painted these various pieces of 'clutter' which will at some stage be added to the finished layout.The two gas bottles above may look like the ones from the 1/35th scale Italeri Field Set, but they are in fact scratch-built using large plastic knitting needles that I 'turned' on a Black and Decker hand drill using pretty rudimentary tools. The caps and dials were scrounged from the Italeri set and glued in place with superglue. Painting followed my usual basecoat of acrylic paints then blending wi

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