Pirates


Pirates! Piraci!

Last Sunday I took the part in the game to memorialize our friend Hugh, who tragically died three years ago. For the game, we used the pirate rules, his last work with some Bill Gilchrist amendments. Especially for that game, I painted my Pirate Captain and soon I'm going to create a little band of maybe 15 men plus a ship. Once again we all gathered in Gothenburg in Prestonpans.W ostatnią niedzielę, wziąłem udział w grze mającej na celu uczczenie pamięci naszego tragicznie zmarłego ponad trzy lata temu przyjaciela, Hugha. Do gry użyliśmy zasad do pirackich gier, które były jego ostatnią pracą z pewnymi dodatkami stworzonymi przez Billa Gilchrista. Specjalnie na tą grę pomalowałem mojego kapitana piratów a w przyszłości zamierzam jeszcze dodać mu z 15 ludzi i jakiś okręt. Ponownie zebraliśmy się w Gothenburgu w Prestonpans.Remembered my last game with those rules I decided to be like Switzerland. Slowly collecting money from luting, trying to stay neutral as long as it possible and fight only when there is no

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On parade! Pirates and swashbucklers!

Continuing with my On Parade! postings in which I’m attempting to review every wargames figure I own, this time we take a look at my pirate collection.  It’s odd, isn’t it? In this age of parents not letting kids play with toy soldiers or toy guns, and schools not teaching about battles and soldiers, we still find that kindergartens and primary schools love pirates. Some of the most blood-thirsty, villainous, chauvinistic characters around, and yet little Johnny and Sally sit and make eye-patches and cardboard swords (swords?!) in class. On the other hand, maybe it isn’t so surprising – after all, pirate crews were very democratic, and feminists might approve of pirates like Ann Bonny and Mary Read. Anyway, I’m not complaining – I love pirates! So they form part of my wargames collection, and have provided many an exciting and fun-filled game. Yes, that’s a skeleton pirate on the left (from Moonlight Miniatures). All the other figures are by Wargames Foundry. You can see Calico Jack all in whit

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Western wagons and Pirate's Captain. Zachodnie wozy i piracki kapitan.

Small painting job finally finished. Three elements only this time. Two western type wagons in 15mm for my Commonwealth and Swedish armies. Both from Wargamer. The third was my Pirate's Captain. That one is from Warlord Games. Now, I need to do an annual check of all my figures and after that, I can start a new project!Mała praca malarska w końcu skończona. Tylko trzy elementy tym razem. Dwa zachodnie wozy dla moich armii Rzeczypospolitej i szwedzkiej. Oba od Wargamera. Trzecią jest piracki kapitan. Ten z kolei jest od Warlord Games. Teraz czas na coroczną kontrolę wszystkich moich figurek i po tym można zacząć nowy projekt.

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On Parade! 17th century French crew

In my last On Parade! posting I showed off my Dutch crew for the pirate game Blood and Plunder. This time it is the turn of the French. Boucaniers: The boucaniers were known for their deadly accuracy. These hunters of cattle and swine came from the western end of Hispaniola, and lived a rough backwoods life. It wasn’t long before these enterprising woodsmen began attacking passing Spanish ships, usually from small canoes or other small watercraft. Flibustiers: These were only second only to the boucaniers in experience in raiding Spanish ships and settlement. Like most French fighting men of the time, they preferred to quickly move into close action where they could bring their braces of pistols to bear at point blank range. Milices des Caraïbes: These militia formed the primary defence forces of the French Caribbean. They ranged from well-equipped companies manned by former buccaneers, free blacks, or planters to poorly equipped ones composed mainly of indentured servants, poor workers and slaves.

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On parade! 17th century Dutch crew

Continuing my sporadic series of On Parade! postings, we come to my so-called Pirate collection – not all of whom are actually pirates! So let’s start with my newest Blood and Plunder faction, the Dutch. As per normal, click on the pictures to enlarge them.  According to the Blood and Plunder rule book, the French were the first to singe the Spanish beard in the New World, the English were to set the beard aflame, but it was the Dutch who truly scourge the whiskered Spaniard from head to toe. Few indeed hated the Spanish as did the Dutch, as with a vengeance they followed their ‘Sea Beggar’ ancestors. The 28mm figures that make up my Dutch force are all from Firelock Games. They are certainly beautifully sculpted, and really capture the look of the era. To the right of the above picture are my two commanders. The flamboyant genetleman in yellow is a generic Dutch captain, whom I have painted to resemble Lieutenant Willem van Ruytenburch in Rembrandt’s famous Night Watch paintin

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Dutch force for Blood and Plunder *really* afloat

I’ve been working on some 28mm Dutch figures for my Blood and Plunder forces. These are exquisitely sculpted figures, which my fairly impressionistic style of painting doesn’t really do justice to. I based my militia on the marines/soldiers in the recent movie about Admiral de Ruyter, who wear green coats. I’ve no idea what they based their research on … but it is good enough for me! I loosely based my two commander figures on Rembrandt’s famous painting, The Night Watch. For these pics, I posed my miniatures on a 3D-printed ship from Printable Scenery … afloat in my spa. She only sunk with all hands once!

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Island Natives from Firelock Games

Island natives are must when playing adventurous pirate games in the Caribbean. My buddy Jens got some island natives from Firelock Games to form a "crew" of their own.Firelock Games released their Island Natives as part of their No Peace Beyond the Line kickstarter campaign last year. The minis arrived some time around April this year and Jens sent them to Poland based painting service Den of Imagination to have them painted. As you can see, the results are rather nice:During our recent mini campaign with played a couple of games with the first version of the Caribbean Island Native crew and we were quite happy with how they felt.Sneak preview of the Caribbean Natives crew rulesNatives attack a colonial town from the jungle

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Vauban Fort from More Terrain

When it comes to pirate settings Vauban Forts are greatly iconic "buildings". I have been wanting to add such a mighty fortification to my collection of terrain pieces for years. In this post I take a closer look at my recent acquisition: the Vauban Fort from More Terrain.A Vauban Fort has been on my to-do list - or let's say - to-have list - for almost as long as I am playing pirate games. However, most products are 3D printer files such as Laser Dream Works' Vauban Fort Series (see their video). And did you see Anton Ryzbak's mind-blowing fort?I came across the fort on Facebook and was immediately convinced by the photos. I did hesitate to spend the 195 Euros but in anticipation of our pirate campaign I decided to go all in. As is so often the case in our hobby, this seems to have been the right decisions since the fort is now out of stock and who knows if it'll become available again.The Vauban Fort is produced by Germany-based company More Terrain. The model comes painted in two versions: grey and be

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Paddling Up the Congo

ScoutsBay Brown A finished pirate (actually a Darkest Africa musketeer)With October just over the horizon, it's time to paddle off up the Congo, with my painting project for the next month or so, a Jungle Tribes column with all the whistles and bells. I'm going to start today with a basecoat of Foundry Bay Brown Shade, which I'll follow up with a highlight in Bay Brown and Bay Brown Light as the next two stages. I used this approach with a couple of my old 28mm Foundry Pirates and I think it gives a very good, not too light but not too dark skin tone. I may or may not give them a wash after the flesh tones are done but will probably move onto the loin cloths, head dresses, bangles, beads and masks before the ink wash is applied. I thought about texturing the bases before painting but I'll leave that until right at the end. 

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Dogs Ahoy Pirate Campaign 2019

This week we had our half-yearly pirate campaign. At 5 and a half days it has been the longest yet and also one of the most productive ones. Here's a brief summary with some photos.Days 1-2: In the TownThe first two days saw our crews fighting it out in the town. This is our usual start to allow for collecting treasures to purchase weapons and equipment, hire new crew members (such as the highly popular surgeon and scholar) and - of course - earning experience to improve the characters' skills and earn new abilities.Day 3: On the High SeasThis day was dedicated to sea battles. Our first game - "Breakthrough" - ended for me with the Pirate Fluyt ramming my British Unrated Cutter so that I could not move (not to mention the human casualties!). Then, the race between the French Fluyt and the two British Sloops ended in a draw with both sides reaching the table edge in the same round.Day 4: Storm the FortI had been looking forward to this day probably the most. I had ordered the Vauban Fort from More-Terrain some

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Why Do We Celebrate Talk Like a Pirate Day and Other Fake Holidays?

Got plans for September 19, 2019? You do now: It's International Talk Like a Pirate Day! So prepare your timbers to be shivered and wait… what? Is this seriously a holiday? What is this all about? And why, exactly, is there a formal holiday for not just pirates but for talking like pirates? You have questions. We have (weird) answers.Talk Like A Pirate

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Why Do We Celebrate Talk Like a Pirate Day and Other Fake Holidays?

Got plans for September 19, 2019? You do now: It's International Talk Like a Pirate Day! So prepare your timbers to be shivered and wait… what? Is this seriously a holiday? What is this all about? And why, exactly, is there a formal holiday for not just pirates but for talking like pirates? You have questions. We have (weird) answers.Talk Like A Pirate

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Naval Projects and Plans

I'm back at work tomorrow, so I suspect very little will happen at the workbench for a while, especially as most of my weekends are also taken up with various family things. Nonetheless, I've decided to finally finish the 1/2400th Prussian and Danish naval forces for the 1864 Second Schleswig War at some point this Autumn, as they been hanging about for years and really should have been painted a long time ago. In a slight change of plan, I'm going to paint the entire Prussian fleet first, give or take,  followed by the Danes second. The Prussians have more ships but most of them are first and second class gunboats, which should be relatively quick to do, with only three of four larger ships, none bigger than a small frigate.  This means I should, famous last words, get them done in short order, assuming I get on with it and don't get side tracked. In the longer term, there's obviously the Danes and Austrians to paint, along with some generic merchant shipping, but I'm also thinking of starting

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