Tanks


War and Peace 2019

Saturday I went to the War and Peace Revival show at Paddock Wood in Kent. This time I accompanied the Veterans and saw another side of the show that I haven't encountered before. I'm normally straight into the Living History areas of the show or hastening to the arena to see some armour in action. This time my day started with a service of remembrance surrounded by some highly decorated veterans.Don and Albert look through a book of D-Day photo's. Inside the Veterans MarqueeParade of heroes. Some very decorated men and women in this lineupThe drumhead remembrance service was very movingJohn and Don have a 'little' snifter! As the service came to an end, so did the rain so we headed out for a very quick look around the showground. Luckily I've been here many times and I knew to wear some waterproof shoes! Let's just say the roads around the side had gone from plain old mud to mud-coloured soup with the passage of thousands of visitors and hundreds of military vehicles.This replica StuG is often seen

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Two Pzkfw IV Ausf J painted twice!

I nearly finished these tanks last week but in the end, I cleaned and re-primed them and started again...let me explain the madness. I decided to give these vehicles a different colour scheme, opting for something called Ambush Camouflage. This is a hard-edged camo that started to appear on German tanks in August 1944. It consisted of the usual Green and Red/Brown stripes over Dunkelgelb with dots of opposing colours over the top. A bit complex, but considering I don't have an airbrush I thought it would be a good alternative to my previous attempts at soft-edge camo. Initially, I was reasonably happy with it, although the dots were a bit bigger than I liked. Then I made a massive tactical error. Add captionI usually apply an ink wash to my models to darken shadows and, in the case of vehicles, deepen the recesses around hatches and engine grills etc. This time, for reasons even I don't understand I didn't use my normal ink but opted for Army Painter Strong Tone instead. And frankly, that ruine

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Quick visit to the Mucklebrough Collection

The Family and I went away last week as it was the school half term break. Thankfully it wasn't as cold as it could have been for the time of year and we managed to make the most of the trip, despite the fact that many of the museums I wanted to visit were closed for the winter! Fortunately, the Mucklebrough Museum was open and I was given a day pass by the wife to visit it while she and the youngling went to a nearby zoo.Concentrating while taking a selfie! I'm very happy in this picture...honest. Russian T34 & T55 tanks with a British A34 CometThe Artillery HallThe museum also has an excellent gallery of models and military diorams88mm FLAK37 German Anti-Aircraft gunCanadian 'Grissley' ShermanIf you are ever in the area this place is well worth a visit. Some of the exhibits are a little cramped but the collection is very impressive none-the-less. 

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Sturmgeschütz III

(Saturday DRAFT) From LeeH - Battle hardened Sturmgeschütz III (8pts)The Sturmgeschutz series of Assult Guns was based on the proven chassis of the Panzer III and was probably one of the most effective weapons in Germany's armoured divisions. Initially designed as assault artillery its role developed as the war progressed. After encountering Soviet T24's and KV tanks the role of tank destroyer, with it's by now upgraded and powerful forward facing gun, became more important. Another factor in the success and utility of the StuG's was probably not something the Nazi regime would have liked to trumpet. They were relatively cheap to build and Germany was increasingly short on resources. By 1944 the StuG III had been upgunned with the 7.5 cm StuK 40 L/48 gun making it a much more deadly weapon. The final version of the series was the StuG II Aust G saw service right through the Normandy campaign and beyond. Its superstructure had been widened and it was slightly taller allowing

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Da Vinci Tank - Mercenary

From LeeH - Da Vinci's Fighting VehicleRenaissance Italy was a patchwork of warring city-states, each constantly looking for an advantage over the other. Rich in coin but poor in manpower the states employed large mercenary contingents into their armies. Not, you would have thought, ideal territory for a jobbing artist and inventor such as Leonardo. However, when he was looking for a new patron instead of offering his sword arm in return for payment he offered the fruits of his prodigious mind.One potential employer was the Duke of Milan and Leonardo tempted him with a new and innovative weapon of war. Writing to the Duke in 1487, Da Vinci stated: "I can make armoured cars, safe and unassailable, which will enter the close ranks of the enemy with their artillery, and no company of soldiers is so great that it will not break through them. And behind these, the infantry will be able to follow quite unharmed and without any opposition.”Suitably impressed, the Duke of Milan employed the renaissance polymath.

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Da Vinci's Fighting Vehicle

Renaissance Italy was a patchwork of warring city-states, each constantly looking for an advantage over the other. Rich in coin but poor in manpower the states employed large mercenary contingents into their armies. Not, you would have thought, ideal territory for a jobbing artist and inventor such as Leonardo. However, when he was looking for a new patron instead of offering his sword arm in return for payment he offered the fruits of his prodigious mind.One potential employer was the Duke of Milan and Leonardo tempted him with a new and innovative weapon of war. Writing to the Duke in 1487, Da Vinci stated: "I can make armoured cars, safe and unassailable, which will enter the close ranks of the enemy with their artillery, and no company of soldiers is so great that it will not break through them. And behind these, the infantry will be able to follow quite unharmed and without any opposition.”Suitably impressed, the Duke of Milan employed the renaissance polymath.Leonardo da Vinci's fighting vehicle em

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Paper Panzer E-10

WWII tanks are very beautiful, especially the German ones. I like bricolage tanks (old or foreign tanks recycled for new roles with new armour and weapons) and late war tanks. Moreover there are so many project for future tanks that you can design your fictional tank of 1946 or 1947. These are called paper panzer because they existed only on paper. The E series was the attempt to build a standardized series of tanks, from light ones to heavy ones. The E-10 was a jagdpanzer between 10 and 25 tons. I like its low profile and its flat top surface. I build even a E-10 panzer with a Leopard turret, just an historical extrapolation than a real project. My tanks are resin models with late war colours and camouflage. They are in 1/56 scale because I wish to use them with 28mm soldiers. A King Tiger or a Maus tank could be just a little bigger for a table. If you want to play tanks in 28mm, a realistic table have to be big as a swimming pool.

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TANKS Modern Age

I recently finished a few models for TANKS Modern Age.  I picked up the starter box for Christmas and have some Team Yankee stuff in my collection of stuff.  I was not very creative painting these models but it was a great break from other projects.  This is going to be a fun game that I can play at home with my wife and just have some fun with it.  On the left are two Russian T-64 on on the right is an M1 and M1A1.  I will admit that the M1A1 is not much fun to build.  The back storage and side pieces just don't go on easily.  My buddy Dusty created a great video showing how to build and paint the M1's and it is very helpful.  He has a lot of great videos on his YouTube channel, My Little Piece check out his work.    

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Battle of the Poppy Field

On Sunday I joined the Rejects for a very special commemorative game. Stuart called me about this a couple of weeks ago and I immediately said I was available. Most  of the guys were able to make it for this game and Postie asked me to make the arrangements for us to participate in the silent reflection scheduled for 11am. A full write up of the game with pictures is below but as this was a commemorative game I would like to start with a couple of dedications. Stuart in particular dedicated this game to the memory of his Great Grandfather, Private James Till of the Royal West Kent Regiment. Private Till died at the young age of 30 somewhere on the Western Front in France in July 1917 and Stuart is very fortunate to have some family memento's that provide a very direct link to the war that ended exactly 100 years earlier. Embroidered silk postcards were one of the most popular ways for soldiers to send their love back home. Originally hand-embroidered by women in France and Belgium, the postcard

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