The Glorious Revolution


Guest Post: The work of Gareth Lane Dutch troops 1690s

I have the privilege of receiving photos of the work of many talented gamers add collectors interested in our period.Recently I was sent some wonderful pictures of units from the collection of Gareth Lane. I was very taken with the style of the units and the painting.Gareth has used wonderful castings from North Star's 1672 range and has depicted some fine units from the forces of the Dutch Republic. Gareth has portrayed these in the period of the Glorious Revolution and campaigns in Flanders during the 1690s.I am sure you'll like them as much as I do.Thanks Gareth for sharing and hopefully we'll see more of your work in the near future.

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Book review: Wars and soldiers in the early reign of Louis XIV : Bruno Mugnai

This first volume of a series is another example of the gusto with which Helion's Century of the Soldier series managing editor is attacking his subject. A decade ago finding books like this was like looking for hen's teeth, these days Charles Singleton is issuing them like the belt feed of an MG42.It's a weighty tome with more than 250 pages and a broad spread of content from period background through organiztional history, uniforms, campaigns, standards, orders of battle and many illustrations.The period plates are chosen well and there are several modern and excellent black and white line drawings. Bruno Mugnai's text is crisp and to the point and the centrepiece of the book is sixteen pages of colour plates of the Dutch army and its flags from 1660 - 1687 by the author.This period is directly before the Nine Years War and includes the Dutch Wars. I was particularly interested in the plates as the representation of Dutch Marines of 1667 (the year of their formation) is excellent if open to interpretation.A

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Fate, Fortune or Faithlessness? Camaret Bay 18th June, 1694: Part 4

A map drawn up to wargame the actionWargaming Camaret BayIt does sound unmistakably like D-Day. It took place around 200 miles from and almost exactly 250 years to the day before Operation Overlord as, although the date is now noted at June 18th the old style calendar marks it as June 6th or 7th in most sources. The action can be fought in various ways; as a large scale battle, as a skirmish or even as a naval action with the troops playing no real part.All England wall of firepowerLarger scale gameAlthough Tollemache had as many as 10,000 men in fifteen battalions, his spearhead was apparently a battalion of converged grenadiers supported by 900 pike and shot armed infantry behind. This landing force can be contained in four to six large boat models each representing a cluster of well-boats. In each, half a battalion of infantry could be transported. Reinforcements can be fed in using the same principle from the fleet sitting at the table edge or off table. The Allied attack will continue as long as some uni

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The National Museum of Ireland - a lovely wee surprise

The parade ground square at Collins Barracks which is an old British Army facility from the late 18th/early 19th century.I squeezed this in whilst speaking at a conference in Dublin. What a wonderful find it was. In this first post I thought I would trail the variety of fantastic and interesting militaria contained in a very substantial and well laid out national museum. I visited the Collins Barracks site on Benburb Street.Pikeman from the Confederate Wars periodThe displays were well set out and the information useful and engaging. The staff were also very helpful. There may be other displays in the other sites but this one begins the military history in the 16th Century so I didn't see anything about the earlier centuries.Jacobite Grenadier at Limerick. More of him laterThe 17th and 18th century exhibits were the most interesting to me and some of the best.The ACW section was also quite significant. Irish military history is long and rich but because Irish soliders were inviariably fighting as a contingent

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Fate, Fortune or Faithlessness? Camaret Bay 18th June, 1694 Part 1

This piece was first run in Wargames Illustrated in 2016. I thought it a solid multi-parter to run on the blog whilst I am holidaying.Contemporaneous notorietyThe disastrous attack at Camaret Bay on June 18th1694 was a very English tragedy. From a distance of 322 years it is easy to understand that a relatively minor operation which went badly wrong and resulted in the death of a largely forgotten general is of little if any significance. Although few may have been aware of the Battle of Camaret Bay or Thomas Tollemache before reading this piece it is likely that most if not all readers have heard of John Churchill and more than a few of King James II and Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, Seignur de Vauban, Marshal of France. Each is linked directly or indirectly to a disastrous military adventure which in its own way will have shaped subsequent momentous historical events.Tollemache by Sir Godfrey Kneller.If we hopped into the DeLorean and set the dial to April 1694 the names of our protagonists would be as ub

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Marlborough's Danes

Yes, I know. How could Warfare have produced such an important component of the armies of the period without me getting my act together and at least letting everyone see what they look like in battalions?An unforgivable omission but as always I will trot out my 'one man team' excuse. Well, that and Ottomans, Wagonburgs, wee ships, Cossacks and the like.Anyway at last I have some units of Danes to show as I imagined them when first commissioned as sculpts. Smart uniforms, martial air, nice colour combinations - the Danes are one of those wargaming contingents which ticks every box - ubiquitous over an extended period, manageable in size, all arms present, nice uniforms and flags, a considerable amount of glory, some controversy and as I have said before.. the ain't nothing like a Dane!My main interest in the Danish contingent started with their involvement in Ireland. A reputation for professionalism and experience saw them used in the front line and frequently. Off the top of my head The Boyne, Limerick, rapp

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Nice little Boaties - Modelling 1/2400 warships for wargaming 1650-1720

Royal Charles 2nd Rate -the sixth attempt. 1st Rate on the right, my first attempt - many learns in between.Taking the title from Gunter Heim's description of the models featured on the 'Sink the Dreadnought' piece, I can do nothing but agree. The 1/2400 scale models from Tumbling Dice representing ships of the Anglo Dutch War period are good for circa 1640 - 1720 I would say. Many were built in the 1650s and lasted well into the next century.A Dutch HeokerThe conflicts they fought in are perfect for my interest and therefore that of many followers of this blog. The English Commonwealth, The Restoration, The Anglo Dutch Wars, The Sedgemoor Rebellion, The Glorious Revolution, The Nine Years War, Ireland 1688-1692, The American Colonies, The Caribbean, Darien, African and Asian Trade Wars, The Scanian War, The Great Northern War, The War of the Spanish Succession and of course Hollywood history such as Pirates of the Caribbean.The models are deceptively simple castings however, when you come to paint them, the

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Did you hear the one about four Dutch Heokers? December 1689.

Eilean Dub Mor, December 4, 1689A regimental camp at Dundalk October 1689 - King William's soldier die in droves daily.William III and his army landed at Carrickfergus, Ulster in August 1689 and the international struggle for Ireland began. His army was ill-served by its officers and during the terrible winter camp at Dundalk thousands of men died from disease. The situation was disastrous and dangerous. Lack of proper supplies, poor sanitation, inadequate food and damp shelter resulted in dozens of preventable deaths every day. Something had to be done to alleviate the army's wasting away.The French Navy made passage to Ireland challenging and so convoy routes had to be kept secret. In the dead of winter a small yet important mission comprising four small Dutch heokers has navigated Cape Wrath and is weaving through the inner Hebrides to come into Dundalk harbour from the north. The ships are heavy laden and armed but without an escort. They have been told a man o'war will pick them up off Eilean Dub Mor (Th

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Blood & Cutts Part 3

The final part of a piece on one of the country's forgotten Lions...An appraisal of England’s fire eating general Cutts probably did not get into the heat of battle at Blenheim but his commanded a large body of the army.Cutts on the table topIn a skirmish game John Cutts would be a fearless leader with a nose for danger. Fond of impetuous charges, close combat and impossible odds. A character who scorns death and needs no morale tests. He will win or fight to the death trying. As a colonel leading his regiment whether that be in Ireland against the Jacobites or Flanders fighting the French, he should count as a talismanic figure adding both combat and morale bonuses. Particularly in offensive situations, Cutts should add the highest possible command modifiers if attached to a battalion.As a brigadier or major general he should continue to add top level modifiers where directly attached to a unit. His wider command ability should perhaps model a man who finds it difficult to change tack when confronted wi

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Blood & Cutts! Part 2

The second part of my piece on Lord John Cutts of Gowran.An appraisal of England’s fire eating generalEnglish hero - for sure, Subject of Swiftian satire - definitely!What he did bestHis speciality was leading assaults into the breach. Many of his wounds were received in such situations. He seemed to gravitate towards peers and superiors with a similar disposition to his own. One such, Thomas Tollemache, a rival of John Churchill and another fire-eater, died after being hit in the groin by a cannonball during the disastrous Camaret Bay amphibious landing. Cutts himself performed insanely reckless feats there yet, lived to tell the tale.Man on the make - Cutts at 24 leading Transylvanian locals against the hated TurksBeing point-man or any man for that matter, during the storming of a breach was generally recognized as a suicide mission. It was a task normally assigned to an army’s biggest, baddest head-bangers – the grenadiers. Tooled up with flintlock muskets, bags of hand grenades, hatchets, occasionally be

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Blood & Cutts! Part 1

This article appeared in issue #379 May 2019 or Wargames Illustrated. I am publishing it on the blog in three parts as it is fairly long.An appraisal of England’s fire eating general     John Cutts painted by Wissing around 1687, aged about 24Who?Like many notable men of his era, John Cutts is difficult to define in terms of good or bad, wrong or right. If considered only by his military deeds it is easy to be seduced and never get beyond the evocative sobriquet of Salamander - the man who can be found where the action is hottest and the danger most parlous. For wargamers, this may be enough. A Hector on the field of battle with more tales to tell in a single life than many others combined. Job done.Read about his political career and the portrait loses some of its lustre. Driven by chronic financial problems, the story of a wheeler-dealer, schemer, and petitioner involved in countless intrigues emerges to cast shadow across a previously sunlit vista. A hero who became the subject of Swiftian s

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William III's Italian Allies during the LoA War Book offer

Another generous offer from the Helion Company for members of the League of Augsburg Blog...William III's Italian Ally: Piedmont and the War of the League of Augsburg 1683-1697 by CIRO PAOLETTI, illustrations by Bruno Mugnaihttps://www.helion.co.uk/war-and-soldiers-in-the-early-reig…from now till the end of March £25 post free within the UK, at cost shipping for the rest of the world.To order the book please send me an email to charlesjsingleton@yahoo.co.uk with WLLIAM III's ITALIAN ALLY in the header bar.In the main text section please add your address and add the email you use for PayPal transactions, this speeds up thing. Note- you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay by PayPal. If you don't like the shipping costs, simply cancel the invoice.I'll be reviewing the book on the blog soon

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The Army of the United Provinces 1660-1687 Book Offer

For members of the League of Augsburg blog here in another attractive offer from Helion:WARS AND SOLDIERS IN THE EARLY REIGN OF LOUIS XIV. VOLUME 1 - THE ARMY OF THE UNITED PROVINCES OF THE NETHERLANDS, 1660-1687 by Bruno Mugnaihttps://www.helion.co.uk/war-and-soldiers-in-the-early-reig…from now till the end of March £25 post free within the UK, at cost shipping for the rest of the world.To order the book please send me an email to charlesjsingleton@yahoo.co.uk with THE ARMY OF THE UNITED PROVINCES SPECIAL OFFER in the header bar.In the main text section please add your address and add the email you use for PayPal transactions, this speeds up thing. Note- you do not need to have a PayPal account to pay by PayPal. If you don't like the shipping costs, simply cancel the invoice.I'll be reviewing the book on the blog soon

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Focusing on Sedgemoor Part 3: The Rebel Army

A few militia style clothes may have been the most uniformed anyone got in Monmouth's ArmyTo describe the rebel forces as an army is probably being somewhat overgenerous. Several of the officer cadre including the Duke himself were soldiers, brave, proven and with battle experience gained in formal, continental wars. There were undoubtedly ex soldiers, deserters from the army, militiamen and mercenaries forming a portion of the regiments however, the majority of the men were volunteers, whipped up to rebel against something - the King, Popery, oppression and the usual causes trotted out to get the masses mobilized by their political lords and masters.Not everyone came out for King Monmouth. This however may be a scene from the Bloody AssizesMonmouth landed on June 11 and was executed on July 15. Even the most zealous supporter of the cause would have difficulty in arguing that the assembled volunteers could  have been moulded into an army with the necessary organization, command structure, campaign plan,

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One to One wargaming - table top reality

A real life soldier! Musketeer Sean of a Jacobite regiment in Ireland circa 1689. Copyright B Hilton.Figure gaming usually falls into some broad categories in terms of scale. Firstly there is the model scale and secondly, the model to man ratio.Typically 40mm, 28/25mm, 20mm, 15mm, 10mm, 6mm are the most common categories for the former. Of course there are several intermediate scales and some excessively large and small ones however, we are talking here neither of using hair rollers to represent the Imperial Guard nor of Action Man hiding in the begonias of your back yard to ambush Combat Johnnie. Let's stay with the more common and thus majority scales.Re-enactors in a single rank with modest space between each. Copyright B.Hilton.The second scale refers to how many models represent how many men and horses. This spectrum covers at one end: one model is one man and at the other end: where one model is perhaps one hundred men.Chopping out the Glitterati style games often featured in hobby magazines and focusin

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