The Glorious Revolution


Campaign Turn 1 complete - Round up

One turn down and five great games each with interesting results. Apart from the plenary information made available to everyone below, each player received a private breifing of events in their campaign orbit. The table shows the raw points scores after ship repairs but before purchases and upgrades for turn 2. The limit is 200 points spent per turn and players can go into debt and spend the 200 if they wish. End of Campaign turn 1 ADMIRAL/GENERAL AT SEA POINTS Baert 260 De Ruyter 177.5 Barre 116 O’Brien -17 Tocht -179 This relates to decisions and aspects of their fleet management which impact on the campaign overall.New missions will be detailed soon.Meanwhile, here are some highlights from the previous five battles:Barre's ChallengeThis was never going to be a full scale battle as no state of war existed between France and England however, Barre's squadron came out decisively on top forcing the enemy to submit to the conditions imposed by the King for foreign vessels in the channel.D

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8 battlefields.... and a wedding!

Is that possible?In Scotland it is! Between leaving home in East Kilbride and arriving at the Craigellachie Hotel near Dufftown we passed through or within one mile of eight battlefields.Craigellachie bridge over the Spey in the heart of whisky country. Manufactured in Wales!The destination was a beautiful Georgian era bridge over the River Spey at Craigellachie on which three famous Highland regiments ended their independent histories in 1994.Plaque at the centre of the bridge - deep in the heart of the HighlandsIn sequence of the Outbound leg:Covenanters stand to face King Charles's regularsBothwell Bridge 1679: Covenanter forces fighting against a Royal army under Monmouth. This resulted in the rout and destruction of Covenanter forces. The A725 cuts right across Monmouth's deployment area.Banners from some of my ScotsBannockburn 1314: The totem engagement of the Scottish Independence Wars. King Robert defeats Edward II's English Army before Stirling Castle. Although the precise location of the two armies

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Naval campaign game 5: All hands to the oars!

Darkness and fog - ideal for an escape bid from a potentially hostile harbourNovember 23rd, 1688: CopenhagenChaos reigns supreme in England. The invasion by Willem of Orange less than three weeks previously has caused the army to disintegrate. The naval service is in turmoil, torn between loyalty to its old commander in chief and King, the officers and men weigh the options for their individual and collective futures.Amidst the warmth of a harbourside tavern in freezing Copenhagen, a conclave of naval officers and merchant captains loyal to King James secretly discuss removing their vessels from port and sailing for Scotland or even Ireland. The Danes already hire thousands of troops to the Dutch and their Imperialist allies. An aggressive move may prompt King Christian’s soldiers to arrest the foreign sailors and impound their ships. To further complicate matters, the English 2nd rate Neptune is at anchor near the Danish naval yards and her captain is a notorious anti-papist and agitator against the King.Tur

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Whiskey in the Jar-oh! Part 6: Characters and stuff

Hogan?Galloping HoganHogan’s role in this scenario is as a scout and not a fighter. He provides the Jacobite player with some extra options which emphasize his local knowledge and cunning.                                                                ·       Hogan and the Shannon: Hogan can change the position of the ford! When he writes down the designated crossing point at the start of the game he also chooses a second option. If at any time during the game his first option looks too risky he throws a D6 and on any score except 1 or 2 his second option becomes the ford unless the first option has already been used. If so, it must stand as the crossing point. He need n

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Whiskey in the Jar-oh! Part 5: The game

The river Shannon at Portumna - near where Sarsfield's cavalry are thought to have forded.What happened? I had originally started posting this seven parter back in 2016 but for some reason never posted the final three parts which I have just come across and realized they were finished!So, picking up from Part 4 which you can link back to here:Whiskey in the Jar-o Part 4Here is Part 5 to be followed closely by Parts 6 and 7.Jacobite raiders - Erin go bragh!Game size & rulesThe game is a large scale skirmish and so I have assumed that the ratio of men to models is about 10:1. This makes the bodies of Horse about 60 men apiece around the size of 2 troops or a small squadron. Any rules could be used and logically I used the company level version of Beneath the Lily Banners.Game lengthThe game has 14 turns.DeploymentAll troops begin the game mounted and in column of march. The start positions are marked on the map. The Williamite Dragoons are in 3 groups of 2 squadrons and can be from different regiments

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Naval campaign missions - the first five

Here are the first five missions for the chosen fleets in overview. One has already been fought, I have written orders from another and await the instructions of the remaiing Generals at Sea.In no particular order:De Ruyter - September 1664 off the Gold Coast/GhanaScenario name: Free trade?The Dutch East India Company (VOC) has been building trade via Gold Coast ports for several years. The English have become increasingly interested in bolstering their cash strapped economy and its own Royal Africa Company has enlisted the support of warships to restrict Dutch trade at the expense of English prosperity. Two large merchantmen are three months overdue in Amsterdam. De Ruyter's squadron was ordered to sea to find them. He has tracked the VOC merchantmen to a bay controlled by the RAC where they are being 'detained' for unpaid duty on goods to be shipped to Europe. The vessels are being protected by an English warship and are under the guns of a large fort. The wind is blowing offshore making an approach to the

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Media work

Been busy talking to some media moguls in the hobby over the last couple of weeks. I did a podcast interview for Henry Hyde's Battlechat Live 32 which seemed to fly by but actually lasted two hours. Well, Henry and I are never short of a word or dozen and the experience was candid and interesting. He has a nice interviewing style which opens the interviewee up before they know it. Henry is a stalwart of the hobby and always innovating.Battlechat 32 Interview with BarryMr Hyde - Battle Chatter supremeThe podcast format is very nice to participate in and I was pleasantly surprised to actually get some emails to say that listeners had found it a good investment of time. I thought I was just rambling on actually!We discussed doing it again and next time focusing on a shorter more subject specific topic. Let's see if that transpires. I think the broadcast goes out to subscribers first and then on general release this week or perhaps next.  Thanks Henry for the opportunity to witter on and for allowing the kin

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The dust is settling.. With Talon and Claw reflections and a QRS!

The book reached its first customer on August 16th and now seems to have arrived in most corners of the globe. It was a massive relief to finish this project which had been all consuming for over eighteen months.The final decision to print is always a bit like betting £50,000 on red. You know there is a risk that something will not be right but having checked and checked, you can't find it. It was just a relief in the end actually to say, it's done, let's print!Now that the dust has settled and the reactions are coming in, I am delighted to say that the words of approval and appreciation have been by far in the majority. I know book releases, particularly those involving rules, go through phases. Phase one is the visual acceptance, phase two is the feedback on things that can't be found, are unclear, or occasionally highlighting mistakes. Phase three is when players start to play and the questions or disagreements on concept or interpretation appear. Phase four is rejection or acceptance for gaming. In other

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Guest Post: The work of Gareth Lane Dutch troops 1690s

I have the privilege of receiving photos of the work of many talented gamers add collectors interested in our period.Recently I was sent some wonderful pictures of units from the collection of Gareth Lane. I was very taken with the style of the units and the painting.Gareth has used wonderful castings from North Star's 1672 range and has depicted some fine units from the forces of the Dutch Republic. Gareth has portrayed these in the period of the Glorious Revolution and campaigns in Flanders during the 1690s.I am sure you'll like them as much as I do.Thanks Gareth for sharing and hopefully we'll see more of your work in the near future.

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Book review: Wars and soldiers in the early reign of Louis XIV : Bruno Mugnai

This first volume of a series is another example of the gusto with which Helion's Century of the Soldier series managing editor is attacking his subject. A decade ago finding books like this was like looking for hen's teeth, these days Charles Singleton is issuing them like the belt feed of an MG42.It's a weighty tome with more than 250 pages and a broad spread of content from period background through organiztional history, uniforms, campaigns, standards, orders of battle and many illustrations.The period plates are chosen well and there are several modern and excellent black and white line drawings. Bruno Mugnai's text is crisp and to the point and the centrepiece of the book is sixteen pages of colour plates of the Dutch army and its flags from 1660 - 1687 by the author.This period is directly before the Nine Years War and includes the Dutch Wars. I was particularly interested in the plates as the representation of Dutch Marines of 1667 (the year of their formation) is excellent if open to interpretation.A

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Fate, Fortune or Faithlessness? Camaret Bay 18th June, 1694: Part 4

A map drawn up to wargame the actionWargaming Camaret BayIt does sound unmistakably like D-Day. It took place around 200 miles from and almost exactly 250 years to the day before Operation Overlord as, although the date is now noted at June 18th the old style calendar marks it as June 6th or 7th in most sources. The action can be fought in various ways; as a large scale battle, as a skirmish or even as a naval action with the troops playing no real part.All England wall of firepowerLarger scale gameAlthough Tollemache had as many as 10,000 men in fifteen battalions, his spearhead was apparently a battalion of converged grenadiers supported by 900 pike and shot armed infantry behind. This landing force can be contained in four to six large boat models each representing a cluster of well-boats. In each, half a battalion of infantry could be transported. Reinforcements can be fed in using the same principle from the fleet sitting at the table edge or off table. The Allied attack will continue as long as some uni

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The National Museum of Ireland - a lovely wee surprise

The parade ground square at Collins Barracks which is an old British Army facility from the late 18th/early 19th century.I squeezed this in whilst speaking at a conference in Dublin. What a wonderful find it was. In this first post I thought I would trail the variety of fantastic and interesting militaria contained in a very substantial and well laid out national museum. I visited the Collins Barracks site on Benburb Street.Pikeman from the Confederate Wars periodThe displays were well set out and the information useful and engaging. The staff were also very helpful. There may be other displays in the other sites but this one begins the military history in the 16th Century so I didn't see anything about the earlier centuries.Jacobite Grenadier at Limerick. More of him laterThe 17th and 18th century exhibits were the most interesting to me and some of the best.The ACW section was also quite significant. Irish military history is long and rich but because Irish soliders were inviariably fighting as a contingent

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Fate, Fortune or Faithlessness? Camaret Bay 18th June, 1694 Part 1

This piece was first run in Wargames Illustrated in 2016. I thought it a solid multi-parter to run on the blog whilst I am holidaying.Contemporaneous notorietyThe disastrous attack at Camaret Bay on June 18th1694 was a very English tragedy. From a distance of 322 years it is easy to understand that a relatively minor operation which went badly wrong and resulted in the death of a largely forgotten general is of little if any significance. Although few may have been aware of the Battle of Camaret Bay or Thomas Tollemache before reading this piece it is likely that most if not all readers have heard of John Churchill and more than a few of King James II and Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, Seignur de Vauban, Marshal of France. Each is linked directly or indirectly to a disastrous military adventure which in its own way will have shaped subsequent momentous historical events.Tollemache by Sir Godfrey Kneller.If we hopped into the DeLorean and set the dial to April 1694 the names of our protagonists would be as ub

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Marlborough's Danes

Yes, I know. How could Warfare have produced such an important component of the armies of the period without me getting my act together and at least letting everyone see what they look like in battalions?An unforgivable omission but as always I will trot out my 'one man team' excuse. Well, that and Ottomans, Wagonburgs, wee ships, Cossacks and the like.Anyway at last I have some units of Danes to show as I imagined them when first commissioned as sculpts. Smart uniforms, martial air, nice colour combinations - the Danes are one of those wargaming contingents which ticks every box - ubiquitous over an extended period, manageable in size, all arms present, nice uniforms and flags, a considerable amount of glory, some controversy and as I have said before.. the ain't nothing like a Dane!My main interest in the Danish contingent started with their involvement in Ireland. A reputation for professionalism and experience saw them used in the front line and frequently. Off the top of my head The Boyne, Limerick, rapp

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Nice little Boaties - Modelling 1/2400 warships for wargaming 1650-1720

Royal Charles 2nd Rate -the sixth attempt. 1st Rate on the right, my first attempt - many learns in between.Taking the title from Gunter Heim's description of the models featured on the 'Sink the Dreadnought' piece, I can do nothing but agree. The 1/2400 scale models from Tumbling Dice representing ships of the Anglo Dutch War period are good for circa 1640 - 1720 I would say. Many were built in the 1650s and lasted well into the next century.A Dutch HeokerThe conflicts they fought in are perfect for my interest and therefore that of many followers of this blog. The English Commonwealth, The Restoration, The Anglo Dutch Wars, The Sedgemoor Rebellion, The Glorious Revolution, The Nine Years War, Ireland 1688-1692, The American Colonies, The Caribbean, Darien, African and Asian Trade Wars, The Scanian War, The Great Northern War, The War of the Spanish Succession and of course Hollywood history such as Pirates of the Caribbean.The models are deceptively simple castings however, when you come to paint them, the

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