Uncategorized


Hurricane Season Scenario 6

Prologue FSA-occupied Guantanamo Bay, Cuba The bulk of the Baton Rouge trundled along the well-worn patrol route,exhaust smoke enveloping the land ship like a morning fog.  General Tume had always enjoyed the mountains, and the Sierra Maestras were no exception.  He briskly walked along main deck, crew snapping salutes as he passed, he returned the gesture with a chuckle: “I thought we had agreed on no-salute Sunday.  Carry on.” The young comms officer sprinted toward Josef, and tripped on the stair way.  She stopped once her shoulder slammed into Tume’s stomach, nearly sending him over the rail.  He took a moment to recover, then helped her to her feet. “Wendy, I appreciate your enthusiasm, but slow it down. I have more than enough paperwork as it is, no need to add a near-miss report to it!  What’s the rush lass?” She straightened her uniform and snapped to attention, trying to catch her breath: “S-s-s-ir” she stammered  “We’ve received an urgent

» View Source Article

The Raft Lookout

To celebrate the new year, I’ve decided to introduce a new section to the blog. In semi-regular intervals, I want to present new(ish) gaming-related stuff that caught my eye. For the first installation, I’ve found four items which might be of interest to you. Peter Pig has launched The 15 Mill, a new pdf magazine “that promotes the use of 15mm miniatures and modeling in wargaming”. As 15mm is a scale very dear to my heart, I find this a commendable enterprise! What is even more exciting is the fact that each issue will include a small game (or “gamette” as they call it), and for each of those games, Peter Pig will produce a special pack of figures. The first figure pack is now available: it’s a lovely set of duellers (so we can get an idea what the first game will be about…). The magazine itself contains all sorts of useful articles and is not limited to Peter Pig-related topics. It is available for free, so why not give it a try and download it here? The end of

» View Source Article

A town during the Peninsular War

Over the last month or so I’ve been busy making a number of buildings from Florian Richter and Peter Dennis’s wonderful book European Buildings: 28mm paper models for 18th & 19th century wargames. You simply cut these buildings out of the book, and then fold and glue them together. I did add some  inner strengthening with heavy card to make them more sturdy, but otherwise my models are straight from the book. Today I set them all out on my wargames table, along with some existing scratch-built buildings (top centre) and a few commercial models (top left). You can click on the above picture (and also all the other pics in this posting) if you want to see these models in more detail. Here’s the main street, with a walled house and stables on the left, and a church with some porticoed houses on the right. The walled house is designed for a northern European setting, but I think works perfectly well for the Peninsular War. The town has a beautiful chateau, which I’ve given a walled garden

» View Source Article

This was 2018

2018 was a decidedly mixed year on the real life side, with some bumps along the road that unfortunately also affected my gaming. However, I did get a good amount of gaming in, judging from the BoardGameGeek statistics: 2018 was definitely the year of Sellswords & Spellslingers. It even overtook Sharp Practice as my most played game! I played it with a lot of different people, which just goes to show what a good game it is – it can be enjoyed by old grognards as well as by newbies. S&S also was the reason for a completely new direction for my miniatures collection: To get the necessary figures, I started collecting and painting good old 28mm fantasy figures, and I have to say that I had a blast. I’m happy that I’ve still had quite a number of games of Sharp Practice – on average I managed one per month. It’s still my favourite game and I can’t see myself losing interest anytime soon.   At the end of the year, a newcomer managed a meteoric rise to third

» View Source Article

Pa rum pum pum pum, Rum pum pum pum, Rum pum pum pum

Two  Napoleonic drummer-boys having a snowball fight get interrupted by a rather special personage! Merry Christmas to one and all!  I wish you all the best of the season. Hopefully your Christmas stocking may contained a toy or two amongst the more mundane gifts! The picture, by the way,  is one of King and Country’s old Christmas sets that I wish was in my Christmas stocking!

» View Source Article

Cracking Christmas Game!

Some weeks ago, my mate Sigur was strick by a vision. ’twas the vision of Dark Elves trying to ruin Christmas for us all. Why not make a game of it, he thought? And he did! It was indeed Sigur who came up with the idea of a special Christmas game. He also provided the evil Dark Elves and their leader, the nasty Greentch (a converted Troll shaman), as well as the good Ice Queen and her loyal bodyguards. And he exceeded himself with splendid winter terrain! Virago contributed Christmas gnomes, which consisted of delightfully converted goblins and dwarves. The scene was set for an epic clash between good and evil… The attacker’s – played by Sigur and me – aim was to enter the houses and steal at least three presents. The defenders’ – played by Virago and his daughters – objective was to drive away the evildoers and save Christmas. Everything was peace and quiet… until the nasty Dark Elves arrived. One group, commanded by me and led by Barei the Witch El

» View Source Article

First Game of Over Malvern Hill

You will remember that I backed the Kickstarter for Over Malvern Hill, the new ACW rules from Stand to Games. The rules arrived and I liked what I saw, so I roped Sigur in for a test game. Unfortunately, he had to cancel, so I decided to run a solo game. This was probably a good idea for a first game, as I had to look a lot of stuff up… I used the Battle of Big Bethel as a scenario. It’s a good scenario for solo gaming, as the Confederates have a rather static defense position. However, it’s a bit difficult to balance, as the Union had a huge advantage in numbers and should, by all accounts, have won – which they didn’t due to the difficult terrain and severe command problems. So, while the Union player has a lot more forces, it should still be quite difficult for him or her to win the game. To spice it up a bit, I introduced a deck of friction cards (I got the initial idea from John Drewienkiewicz’ Wargaming in History Vol. 10: The Shenandoah Valley 1862, a most splendid b

» View Source Article

Closure of massive Chunuk Bair diorama

At 6.00 p.m. on Sunday 2 August 2018, Sir Peter Jackson’s The Great War Exhibition, including the massive Chunuk Bair diorama that I was so involved with back in 2015, closed its doors for the last time. The Great War Exhibition was designed as a temporary exhibition, to be kept open for the duration of the First World War centenary, and to close some time after the November 11th Armistice Day ceremony in 2018. Featured in the exhibition was a huge diorama of the battle that took place at Chunuk Bair on the Gallipoli peninsula in 2015. Around 140 wargamers from all over New Zealand worked in a team effort to paint the 5,000 specially made 54mm Perry Miniatures figures. You can read all about this complex project in this downloadable Wargames Illustrated article. Fellow wargamer, and one of the project heads for the exhibition, Rhys Jones, attended the formal closing ceremony, where he spoke to the invited guests about the creation of the exhibition, including the diorama. “The good news is that

» View Source Article

Queendomino & Lords of Waterdeep

I recently had twice the opportunity to play eurogames. The first one was Queendomino. As I understand it, it’s an enhanced version of Kingdomino, though I’ve never played the latter. Queendomino looks like a typical specimen of its kind: There is an intricate scoring system, so you only know if you’ve won (or even if you’re leading) at the very end of the game. There are no dice, chance is limited to drawing the terrain tiles. There are many different ways of acquiring points and many strategies are possible. The mechanics look well thought-out and balanced and I’d say that, objectively, it’s a very good game. However, I didn’t enjoy it that much. I don’t play many eurogames, and when playing Queendomino I was reminded of the reason for this. There is a theme, but it is irrelevant. Everything is very abstract. There is no story, the only purpose of the game is to understand and exploit the mechanics well enough to accumulate the most points. In the end, it feel

» View Source Article

Scratch Building Wagons in 15mm

Wagons are cool: They can be used as scenario objectives, but they also look nice as pieces of scenery. Unfortunately, wagons are also among the most expensive models a wargamer can own (at least, for those of us who play periods before the 20th century). So I decided to scratch build my own. I found some examples of scratch-built wagons in 28mm on the internet, but I couldn’t find any in 15mm. Fortunately, 15mm is a very forgiving scale and you can get away with a lot, which is a good thing for a sloppy person like me. I didn’t use a lot of materials: For the chassis, I used balsa wood, match sticks and polystyrene. The wheels come from Langely Models, who offer a good selection of sizes. Several miniatures producers offer spare horses, e.g. Alternative Armies or QRF/Freikorp15. Drivers are a bit more difficult to find and I’m not really happy with what I got, but it will work. The first thing I made was a simple hay wagon. The hay was made out of dried tea leaves, which were covered with

» View Source Article

Relief Force – Sharp Practice AAR

Last week-end, Sigur and I had another game of Sharp Practice. I had devised a short and simple scenario: A Union held fort was attacked by a Confederate force, but a relief column was on its way. Sigur decided to command the attackers and got a couple of infantry, a unit of cavalry and a small mountain howitzer. I had three rather weak units in the fort. To make things more interesting, I drew card for the composition of the relief force, which gave me three units of regular infantry and one unit of cavalry armed with breech-loading carbines – quite a potent combination. The set up. Sigur’s cavalry moves along the road towards the bridge. … and there goes the cavalry! Having been shot to pieces by the Union soldiers in the fort, it flees to never be seen again. Sigur’s skirmishers adopt a more methodical approach. With the cavalry heading towards the rear, it’s up to the poor bloody infantry. Hurrah! At the earliest possible moment, the Union cavalry arrives. The Confederates ha

» View Source Article

In Flanders Fields

In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses, row on row, That mark our place; and in the sky The larks, still bravely singing, fly Scarce heard amid the guns below. We are the Dead. Short days ago We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow, Loved and were loved, and now we lie In Flanders fields. Take up our quarrel with the foe: To you from failing hands we throw The torch; be yours to hold it high. If ye break faith with us who die We shall not sleep, though poppies grow In Flanders fields.

» View Source Article

VIVAT 2018

Another weekend, another show – that’s the life of the wargaming jet-set! VIVAT, which is hosted near Vienna, is a small and friendly show. It’s an event where historical wargamers from Austria (and from Hungary) come together, chat and play a couple of games. This year, there were six tables. Additionally, Sigur had his painting station and S-Games had a small table with wares. I used the opportunity to have another game of What a Tanker! This time, the game was set in boccage country, which made quite a difference from the desert setting I’ve played before. Considering that I’m not at all interested in tanks, I’ve a strange liking of this game – perhaps because I can just enjoy it as a game. There was also a SAGA game set during the crusades, which looked rather nice. The Jugula game presented by guys from Salzburg also looked spiffy. The arena was very effective and the game itself looked like fun. This one is a large game of The Great War. If I’m no

» View Source Article