Uniforms


National Museum of Ireland: 17th/18th Century exhibits

A little lead in on the late Elizabethan period with this musketeer and then the display moves on to coverthe 17th/18th century exhibits.  The section begins with a ' How would you invade Ireland?'  map with some notations on it.We them go into the period of the Confederate Wars and the Cromwellian occupation. The mannequins were particularly good.I was very taken by the simplicity of the Jacobite grenadier's uniform, particularly the very plain willie-winkie stocking cap which appears to be very practical. I think the grenadier represents a soldier at the first siege of Limerick. The colours seem to be those associated with John Bellew'a Regiment.The decorative sword is that given by King William to the ancestor of David Archer! (previously featured in an article written for Wargames Illustrtated).The secrete and swrod are of 1682 vintage. The plug bayonet is of the same vintage.The Wild Geese theme post 1714 was very strong and their was an excellent video on the battle of Fontenoy. Remember Fonte

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Book review: Wars and soldiers in the early reign of Louis XIV : Bruno Mugnai

This first volume of a series is another example of the gusto with which Helion's Century of the Soldier series managing editor is attacking his subject. A decade ago finding books like this was like looking for hen's teeth, these days Charles Singleton is issuing them like the belt feed of an MG42.It's a weighty tome with more than 250 pages and a broad spread of content from period background through organiztional history, uniforms, campaigns, standards, orders of battle and many illustrations.The period plates are chosen well and there are several modern and excellent black and white line drawings. Bruno Mugnai's text is crisp and to the point and the centrepiece of the book is sixteen pages of colour plates of the Dutch army and its flags from 1660 - 1687 by the author.This period is directly before the Nine Years War and includes the Dutch Wars. I was particularly interested in the plates as the representation of Dutch Marines of 1667 (the year of their formation) is excellent if open to interpretation.A

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Marlborough's Danes

Yes, I know. How could Warfare have produced such an important component of the armies of the period without me getting my act together and at least letting everyone see what they look like in battalions?An unforgivable omission but as always I will trot out my 'one man team' excuse. Well, that and Ottomans, Wagonburgs, wee ships, Cossacks and the like.Anyway at last I have some units of Danes to show as I imagined them when first commissioned as sculpts. Smart uniforms, martial air, nice colour combinations - the Danes are one of those wargaming contingents which ticks every box - ubiquitous over an extended period, manageable in size, all arms present, nice uniforms and flags, a considerable amount of glory, some controversy and as I have said before.. the ain't nothing like a Dane!My main interest in the Danish contingent started with their involvement in Ireland. A reputation for professionalism and experience saw them used in the front line and frequently. Off the top of my head The Boyne, Limerick, rapp

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From Russia with Liv.. Guard

I am delighted to share the work of Yuriy Hotchkin with Blog followers. Yuriy and his wargaming group are located across both Sankt Peterburg and Moscow and have interest in a variety of periods and scales. Yuriy sent me some wonderful pictures of his Great Northern War Swedes from Warfare Miniatures.These are some of the finest painted examples of our miniatures that I have yet seen.The fact that such wonderful examples of Swedish troops have been so lovingly painted by a Russian  gamer speaks volumes!The regiment is of course the Livgard till Hast (Mounted Life Guard) with their distinctive sky blue uniforms.Yuriy has used models from our Swedish cavalry codes SC01, SC02, SC03,SC04 and SC05 to complete the unit.The painting style is gentle, bright and warm which has produced a striking finish.I particularly like the way he has finished the horses and saddle cloths too which is a lovely detail touch.Here is a link to Yuriy's fantastic work Yuriy's Field of Battle painted minis . Plenty mo

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Tocht naar Chatham 1667 - The 28mm bit begins

The first unit of Dutch Marines - uniform colours from colonial naval infantry of the same period.Having co written Donnybrook and produced an as yet unpublished extension for Beneath the Lily Banners dealing with small unit actions it was always the plan to deal with some of the 1667 Medway fighting in 28mm.Other units will have different flagsThere appears to be no concensus regarding the long sleeve/elbow length cuff debate nor, the apostles/bullet bag debate. As an example consult the following works covering the period 1660 - 1691 and you will see long sleeves and bullet bags as early as 1667 with short sleeves and almost elbow length cuffs as late as 1691! -  Wars and soldiers in the early reign of Louis XIV (Mugnai - Helion), Charles XI's War (van Essen: Helion), Battle of Aughrim 1691(McNally:Helion).A mob of sturdy English Yeomanry - probably called peasants anywhere else!By way of explaining my choice to use Warfare's earlier period ie 1680+ Military Civilians for the combatants this goes part

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New Danish grenadiers and painted firing line

These fine chaps have been available for almost a year but I never got round to putting them in the shop! My fault completely. I had it in my mind to paint them first but that deadline slipped away again and again.Anyway, we have sold a few dozen packs on request over the time period but I apologize for keeping them from you for so long.The Danes retained grenadier companies of significant size with regiments even after the formation of the two battalion Grenadierkorpset at the beginning of the 18th Century. These are painted for Regiment Prind Georg and Regiment Sjaellandske.I also finished painting the firing line and loading infantry codes for the Danes too. Painted as Regiment Jyske, these are equally fine chaps. Danish battalion packs are available on request and a nice Danish starter army deal with Horse and Artillery will be available to coincide with the release of With Talon & Claw which is finally finished!More news on the book release and pre ordering very soon.

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New Ottoman special packs

Here are some pictures of future releases for our Ottoman Turkish range.The first piece is a lovely vignette of a Janissary Cauldron party. For those unfamiliar with this tradition the 'cooking pot' was more precious to Janissary units than any flag. Many of their senior officers had titles relating to posts from the kitchen such as the Soup Maker, the Scullion, the Chef and the Baker. The hearth was seen as at the centre of the Janissary Corps hence this being a centre piece for Janissary units.The second is a previously previewed set of officers for various units in dress less formal than that worn by Janissaries. These would fit well in many units over a wide period from the 1600s to the mid 1700s.

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Here they are! Ottoman Cavalry preview

This was a big job and involved the sculpting of brand new horses in addition to creating all of the various combinations of weapons used by Ottoman cavalry in the 17th and 18th centuries. Clib has done outstanding work on these and set an amazing benchmark for any future cavalry we release.We have a Command set - two officers and a standard bearer. One officer has a helmet with turban wrapped around. By the 17th century sipahis were not as heavily armoured as those of the 15th and mid 16th century.We have bowmen - these are split waist figures and can be used as Sipahis of the Porte, Timariot Sipahis or irregular cavalry. The poses are dramatic and in combination with the mounts create a very strong sense of movement. These are just tacked together temporarily for photography purposes and the two halves fit together very well.We have riders with open hands for carrying lances or javelins these also could be used for almost any role within the Turkish mounted contingents.Of course, no Ottoman army would be co

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I painted them thar Ottermans

Code OT07 Tufeckci firingI know, several months late. C minus on report card and detention for me. Nevertheless, painting these thirty models in five days was not as onerous a chore as it may at first sound.They were really fun to do. The sculpting is wonderful and the poses interesting and natural.Code OT12 Bosniaks/Irregulars loadingI used the following speedy method:1. Hand brushed white undercoat2. Paint flesh and wash with a watered skin tone3. Paint flat colours on all other areas4. Wash with water based soft tone Army Painter (except skin areas).5. Hand brushed matt varnish - solvent basedCode OT010 Segban loadingI avoided certain colours such as - red (except for a couple of hats) and used a very controlled and muted palette selection around stone, browns, buff, sand, off white etc with an  occasional shot of pink, black, green and light blue.I wanted these troops to look poorer, less military and more paramilitary - volunteers, conscripts, booty soldiers, borderers and similar.Code OT08 Tufeckci

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A wee taster.. With Talon and Claw.. news

Neil Roberts outstanding cover with some of Clarence's internal illosThe new Great Northern War supplement for Beneath the Lily Banners 3rd edition is calledWith Talon and ClawThe reason? Eagles and lions with their talons and claws appear in almost all of the arms of the combatant nations of the Great Northern and Eastern Wars - Swedes, Danes, Saxons, Prussians, Poles, Imperialists and Russians.... they were all tearing at each other for years. Some sample pages printed at half sizeIt may seem that I have been at this book for years but we are almost there. As a little bit of hard evidence I wanted to let anyone interested (and it seems that there are a fair few of you) have a shufti at some of the material going into the book. In fact, although the is no official release date I already have pre orders! Some of you were so keen that you got your shout in early. Thanks for that.The force builder section has more than 10 pages of full colour and brand new uniform and flag plates from ClarenceThe book is e

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Battle of the Skull Mound 1677: The Scenario

1677.....The Ottoman Empire, allied with Crimean Tatars is pushing north on the west bank of the great Dnieper river into the Ukranian territories. The first line of defence is offered by Cossacks on both sides of the river.A strong Turkish force composed mainly of infantry has been given the objective of capturing a small Cossack settlement near an ancient Patzinak burial site known locally as Skull Mound. The Cossacks have fortified the village and built temporary defensive works atop the skull hill. A large combined force of infantry and cavalry is rushing to block the advance of the Turks and their Tatar allies........The Ottoman force prepares to attack Skull Mound Ottoman ForceCommander: Skilful. 2 squadrons of Timariot Sipahis. Drilled with lance.1 squadron of Tatars. Raw with bow3 field guns - 1 with Master gunner.1 unit of 12 Archers - Drilled3 units of Sekban infantry. Drilled with matchlock muskets.4 units of Janissaries. Veteran with flintlock muskets.2 units of Guard Janissaries (8 &

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Breaking the surface.. news on the GNW supplement

Mass charge by Polish cavalry 1683My snorkel has just broken the surface as I come up for air before submerging again into SALUTE 19 on Friday and Saturday.Brunswick-Celle infantry 1690sI have not been blogging with regularity over the last three weeks simply because I have snatched every waking hour to finish off the last photos for the new GNW supplement for Beneath the Lily Banners.The shot pool now stands at 307 pictures considered and about a further 200+ rejected for various reasons.The defence of Vlasivka 1709 - from the Battle report in the bookOf the 190 shots which appear in the book, 183 are finalized and in place. I have 7 little troublemakers to complete three of which should be done by the time this post appears. Taking wargaming pictures is great fun but very intensive. I remember watching Duncan Macfarlane do it about twenty years ago without the benefit of a digital camera and Photoshop. You really had to get it right then.Janissary columnNow at least, my process involves:1.Set up.2.Test shot

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