War Games


1066 Tears to Many Mothers Review

1066, Tears to Many Mothers is an all-out offensive two player game covering one of the most important events in English history, the Battle of Hastings, you know, the one where King Harold took an arrow in the eye.  This game, from Tristain Hall is carefully balanced, nuanced and heavily detailed pulling from pretty much every page of the Doomsday Book.It’s taken me a little while to write this review, primarily because of how detailed this game is, my first impression left me wondering if I had missed some key strategy to the game but it also left me with a feeling that I needed to explore the game further and upon doing so I found a deep and rich strategy game.Read more »

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Weird WWII Campaign Idea

The length of this Second World War was disastrous and deadly. 60% of the world's population passed due to lack of food and movement thereof. Chemical weapons and the atomic tactical bombs killed civilian and military outright and the long term results are being felt even today. The petty and those not so petty gods put both man and animal to the torch. They all had their reasons. Sport seemed the favorite. Technological death by machine worked as a modern day scythe on life. When the war in Berlin was about to turn against the Russians, again, after three near misses already...the space people arrived. They took the Russian army side and took what they wanted (after the fall) without any argument from their fearful erstwhile allies (the Russians). German captives/POW's disappeared never to be seen again. The space ships and men also went with the captives. Here we have a photo from PRAVDA showing the strange-fearsome-momentary ally and a captive.

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A Tanker's Tuesday Happy New Year!

Wanted to take a few moments to express my gratitude to everyone that hasstopped by here this past year. I also wish to that everyone has a great new year,full of fun a exciting games. My plans for the forth coming year is to complete myStargrunt/Apocalypse tables for the mega -game this summer....wish me luck!

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Review Book - Red Armour an Examination of the Soviet Mobile Force Concept, R Simpkin, 1984

So this was the summer reading, all part of a project called Deep Battle that I have yet to really start writing about or indeed executing but have been researching since about 2015. Over a wet week in Wales I have been ploughing my way through the 12 essays in this book by Brigadier Richard Simpkin who wrote a series of books on military manoeuvre warfare theory in the mid to late 80s and participated in the wide ranging discussion that went on at that time within NATO with regard to managing the Soviet threat.  Of the essays I am interested in I have now read most of them 2-3 times.  The ideas are complex and Simpkin is rarely an easy read.  Working at it in order to understand what he is saying can be very rewarding. Red Armour, an examination of the Soviet Mobile Force concepts does pretty much what it says on the tin in that it provides, in its 12 essays, a thought provoking and revealing analysis of Soviet Operational doctrine.  Unlike the Race to the Swift which looks at a vari

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